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Evernote - The $0 Growth Engine

Evernote - The $0 Growth Engine | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it
Evernote has never been sexy, almost ran out of money, and doesn’t benefit from the network effects that drive many of today’s successful companies.

Via Mounia RKHA
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

The idea of having a growth engine is essential to startups. Yet, I often see entrepreneurs thinking they can only rely on a great product - or sometimes not even as much: a great idea. Value for startups only come from growth and some great product will simply not make it because they lack a growth engine. 


There are various types of growth engines, including:


- virality (your current users' actions bring your next users)


- stickiness / increased value over time (your users don't do much beyond simple word-of-mouth but as they never leave this ends up in growing usage)


- ad-funded user acquisition (you make enough advertising/premium money from current users to acquire the next users through advertising)


- sales-funded revenue (you make enough sales from current customers to recruit more sales people or fund distribution channels to get the next customers).


What's not a growth engine?


- word-of-mouth


- PR


These are typically not enough to get accelerating growth/traction.


In short, if you don't have a growth engine, you don't have a startup.

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Why and how startups should leverage content marketing

Content Marketing for Startups by Susan Su. What is content marketing? Content marketing is any marketing that involves the creation and sharing of medi
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Is content marketing for established companies only? 500 Startups' Susan Su says no and articulates how to embrace it from an early stage.

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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, April 28, 10:40 PM

Startups should be focused and there's a tendency in Silicon Valley to be "product-only" companies while in early stage. But building a product without customer feedback is a recipe for disaster so marketing is not a late stage activity. And as Susan Su from 500 startups articulates very clearly in this webinar, content now prevails over ads in many ways so that your best bet as a founding team to get your first users, collect feedback and iterate from your MVP might well be content marketing. 

 

The thing is content is complex and time consuming so entrepreneurs embracing it need to be efficient. This webinar gives a great list of recommendations on how to do that and be a lean content marketer.

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A Minimum Viable Product Is Not a Product, It's a Process

A Minimum Viable Product Is Not a Product, It's a Process | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it

An MVP is not just a product with half of the features chopped out, or a way to get the product out the door a little earlier. In fact, the MVP doesn’t have to be a product at all. And it’s not something you build only once, and then consider the job done.

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

JB from our engineering team shared this today and it's a must-read post for any entrepreneur and early-stage startup team member as finding product/market fit is one of the toughest things to do. 

 

Making assumptions about your market and customers is easy, proving them with the least amount of resources and time is hard.

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What entrepreneurs should do before writing a single line of code

What entrepreneurs should do before writing a single line of code | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it

"Why would you invest energy and resources into the development of a product, instead of doing research and coming up with a solid plan and strategy for going to market?"

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

There's a saying that goes: "don't sell the bear's fur before killing it". But there's one that I prefer and that applies to entrepreneurs: "why bother killing the bear if you haven't sold the bear's fur yet?"

 

When I became an entrepreneur 16 years ago, building technology was not as easy as it is today. No AWS, much less ready-made Saas software, etc... So we didn't have the temptation "to build it and they will come".

 

But today, as Bram Kanstein explains in this post, it's easy to forget about doing your research and rush to building a product. 

 

He makes an essential point about understanding the problem solved, current alternatives, etc... and his post is a great read. 

 

But I'll go even further: for a lot of entrepreneurs, finding and building a community and an audience first can be a very valuable exercize. If a successful product can only be built by researching and understanding very well a precise problem and need from a group of people, then identifying that group and making useful connexions within that group is a great first step. In other words:

 

- Don't [build a product] > [find the problem it solves ] > [find the target group that has the problem]

 

- Do [connect with a group that have things in common] > [understand their #1 challenge] > [build a product].

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Oliver Durrer's curator insight, March 16, 4:20 PM

There's a saying that goes: "don't sell the bear's fur before killing it". But there's one that I prefer and that applies to entrepreneurs: "why bother killing the bear if you haven't sold the bear's fur yet?"

 

When I became an entrepreneur 16 years ago, building technology was not as easy as it is today. No AWS, much less ready-made Saas software, etc... So we didn't have the temptation "to build it and they will come".

 

But today, as Bram Kanstein explains in this post, it's easy to forget about doing your research and rush to building a product. 

 

He makes an essential point about understanding the problem solved, current alternatives, etc... and his post is a great read. 

 

But I'll go even further: for a lot of entrepreneurs, finding and building a community and an audience first can be a very valuable exercize. If a successful product can only be built by researching and understanding very well a precise problem and need from a group of people, then identifying that group and making useful connexions within that group is a great first step. In other words:

 

- Don't [build a product] > [find the problem it solves ] > [find the target group that has the problem]

 

- Do [connect with a group that have things in common] > [understand their #1 challenge] > [build a product].

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The no-BS guide to understanding Saas churn

The no-BS guide to understanding Saas churn | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it
There are many ways to calculate churn & each tells a different story about your startup. Ask yourself these 3 questions about how you calculate churn.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Thourough explanation on the various ways to calculate churn but that's the end of the post which is the most valuable to me: what is the churn you can avoid vs the one that's really unavoidable?

 

It's easy to think churn is unavoidable but unlike death and taxes, a lot of churn isn't certain. Some of it can't seem easy to avoid but analyzing it can inspire you new actions with positive outcome for you startup.

 

For instance, I've been through the realization that many very small businesses end up failing - one of the examples Steli mentions in his post. Realizing this made us consider moving up market which tend to be more stable but also have bigger budgets which is how we ended up creating our B2B version alongside our freemium plans

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Roman Temkin's curator insight, March 16, 1:07 PM

Thourough explanation on the various ways to calculate churn but that's the end of the post which is the most valuable to me: what is the churn you can avoid vs the one that's really unavoidable?

 

It's easy to think churn is unavoidable but unlike death and taxes, a lot of churn isn't certain. Some of it can't seem easy to avoid but analyzing it can inspire you new actions with positive outcome for you startup.

 

For instance, I've been through the realization that many very small businesses end up failing - one of the examples Steli mentions in his post. Realizing this made us consider moving up market which tend to be more stable but also have bigger budgets which is how we ended up creating our B2B version alongside our freemium plans. 

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Why early-stage startups should focus on their super-fans (and not casual users)

Why early-stage startups should focus on their super-fans (and not casual users) | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it
Advice to startup founders: Don't try to make everyone happy. You want to focus on the 1 percent most engaged users of your product and make them ecstatic.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Couldn't agree more with what Jordan Stone explained at the Launch Festival as covered by my friend JD Lasica in this post.

 

Why should early stage startup do that?

 

Consider the following: what do you do as a customer of a product when you're reasonably happy vs when you're excited beyond expectations?

 

In the latter case, you'll do a lot more than use the product again: you'll go out of your way to tell your friends about it. You'll post on Facebook, you'll share the excitment. 

 

As a French guy who lives in the US, I have to send money back and forth regularly. Which means EUR/USD Fx transaction costs and wire fees that used to be up to 10%. Recently I discovered TransferWise, a peer-to-peer foreign exchange service that cuts these 10% to 1% or less. And provdes a super smooth experience. What did I do? I posted on Facebook with my community of European expats and of course this generated a lot of attention as they all have the same problem. I'm pretty sure a number of them will use the service. 

 

Would I have done that if I thought their service deserved a B or even an A-? 

 

No. 

 

That's why you should launch an MVP and then iterate based on your power users.

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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, March 5, 8:07 AM

Guillaume Decugis's comment:

"Couldn't agree more with what Jordan Stone explained at the Launch Festival as covered by my friend JD Lasica in this post.

 

Why should early stage startup do that?

 

Consider the following: what do you do as a customer of a product when you're reasonably happy vs when you're excited beyond expectations?

 

In the latter case, you'll do a lot more than use the product again: you'll go out of your way to tell your friends about it. You'll post on Facebook, you'll share the excitment. 

 

As a French guy who lives in the US, I have to send money back and forth regularly. Which means EUR/USD Fx transaction costs and wire fees that used to be up to 10%. Recently I discovered TransferWise, a peer-to-peer foreign exchange service that cuts these 10% to 1% or less. And provdes a super smooth experience. What did I do? I posted on Facebook with my community of European expats and of course this generated a lot of attention as they all have the same problem. I'm pretty sure a number of them will use the service. 

 

Would I have done that if I thought their service deserved a B or even an A-? 

 

No. 

 

That's why you should launch an MVP and then iterate based on your power users."

 

Powerful!

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Focus on your own shit

Focus on your own shit | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it
My eyes crack open. 7am. Roll over. Grab my phone. Start scrolling… Wake up, check Product Hunt. Shit: someone just launched software really similar to my product (and we’re still in beta). Browse …
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

As a startup founder, it's easy to get distracted by competition. We're in a fast-moving world and yes, other people make stuff too.

 

But the reality is that competitions rarely kill startups. While lack of focus certainly does.

 

To quote Paul Graham: "If you make anything good, you're going to have competitors, so you may as well face that."

 

So should you keep your head buried in the sand and not pay attention to the outside world? 

 

Aboslutely not. 

 

My own method for dealing with competition is to focus on customer needs: understanding not just their short-term needs but also their long term ones as well as their challenges is the best way to stay relevant and not having to worry (too much) about competition.

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Should you relocate your startup overseas to Silicon Valley

Should you relocate your startup overseas to Silicon Valley | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it
Think about it as running uphill versus running downhill. You expend the same amount of energy in both cases, but if you’re running downhill, you go much farther.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
Great recap of what moving to Silicon Valley can mean to your startup. Note that Emil doesn't mention "raise money more easily" as one of the reasons for moving. But the wealth of talent and experience is impressive. And can indeed make you go faster - like gravity does.
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Jeffrey Yazwa's curator insight, March 11, 2:20 AM
Great recap of what moving to Silicon Valley can mean to your startup. Note that Emil doesn't mention "raise money more easily" as one of the reasons for moving. But the wealth of talent and experience is impressive. And can indeed make you go faster - like gravity does.
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Series A Benchmark for SaaS Companies

Series A Benchmark for SaaS Companies | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it
These businesses grow from 10k to 93k in MRR in their first year of commercialization and then to 413k of ending MRR in their second.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
Though this is admittedly biased as measured on exceptional companies (27% of which were actually pre-revenue), the TL;DR version of this is:

- you need to show significant MRR traction;

- you need to show more now than was required last year.

Better get your growth model right then.
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The Key Drivers for SaaS Success

SaaS/subscription businesses are much more complex than traditional businesses, and SaaS performance cannot be measured in the same way as traditional business…
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
Great and crystal clear presentation on all the key metrics to master Saas growth - or really subscription-based revenue. Of course, this is all very nice when it's all numbers - the difficulty being to fix the numbers when they're not good.
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Cash Flow Break Even (CFBE) is no longer a dirty word in Silicon Valley

Cash Flow Break Even (CFBE) is no longer a dirty word in Silicon Valley | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it
Leverage. It’s the key to negotiating. Classic negotiating books like Getting to Yes define the BATNA, the Best Alternative to Negotiated Agreement. If you were to walk away from a conversation, what’s the next best choice? The BATNA singlehandedly creates leverage in negotiating.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
5 years ago, when we started Scoop.it, my current company, I quickly realized that shooting for profitability was a bad thing to say among my peers or venture capitalists. When money is available, prioritizing profitability certainly can mean under-optimizing growth. In a world where not even Anazon wants to be profitable (because it can still grow), being a profitable early stage startup somehow denoted lack of ambition. With he recent corrections in unicorn and public tech companies valuations, Tom Tunguz notes that the historical BATNA (negotiation leverage) founded had by having several term sheets from competing funds is quickly disappearing. Another way to create leverage for founders can then be to be CFBE. Not so unambitious anymore, then.
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Chained Probabilities in Startup Business Models

Chained Probabilities in Startup Business Models | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it

Tomasz Tunguz is a venture capitalist at Redpoint and writes about startups, fund raising, SaaS companies, and best practices for founders.

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

An interesting way to think about what it takes to make a startup successful. While the odds are slim that your venture will become the next Facebook, the domino effect theory shows how small wins can accumulate into bigger success.


What it means for entrepreneurs is that you shouldn't be afraid to start by doing things that don't scale. By being excellent at one thing and achieving outstanding results, you'll get a chance that this domino helps tumble the next, bigger one. But by embracing too much, you might just be hitting a wall.

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Data and Perspectives on the Startup Fundraising Market for 2016

Data and Perspectives on the Startup Fundraising Market for 2016 | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it

The late stage market may witness a different phenomenon. More than 40% of the dollars invested in Series B and later rounds originating from corporate venture capital, mutual funds, hedge funds and family offices. This money isn’t committed to startup investing.

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

There's certainly been some valuation adjustments for private unicorns but is a bubble bursting? The data put together by Tomas Tunguz shows how strong 2015 was, particularly for early stage companies. 

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Why nobody will steal your shitty start-up idea

Why nobody will steal your shitty start-up idea. - Personal Growth - Medium
Because nobody cares.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
A fun recap of what many first-time entrepreneurs are irrationally scared about: talking about their startup idea.The thing is there's no better way to fail than keeping things secret. The momentum you get by feeding your initial thoughts with feedback and new ideas is just priceless. So. What are you working on these days?
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France, The New Startup Factory

France, The New Startup Factory | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it

Four French IPOs on the NASDAQ in just 24 months (Criteo, LDR, Cellectis, DBVTechnologies), American VCs investing in France (BlaBlaCar, La Ruche, Believe Digital, Scality, ShowRoomPrive), three new Unicorns (BlaBlaCar, Sigfox, Teads), US market M&As (by Microsoft, Zendesk, Salesforce, Facebook, Adobe), French venture capital industry ranking second in Europe, the forthcoming creation of the world’s largest incubator La Halle Freyssinet in Paris, success stories by French entrepreneurs in the US (Lending Club, Symphony, Tango, PeopleDoc, SmartRecruiter), an American CEO — Cisco’s John Chambers, — declaring that “France is the next big thing.” …

 

Sacrebleu! What is happening in France?

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

It's amazing how much things changed in the past 5 years for the French tech startup ecosystem. This is an energetic recap and shout-out by my friend Romain Serman who details very clearly how and why things changed. 

 

I'm of course very interested in this topic, having been successful with a first start-up in France before failing a second one and relocating to San Francisco for Scoop.it close to 5 years ago now. As I detailed here, I didn't relocate because I felt the French or European scene wasn't good nor because I found it hard to be an entrepreneur in France. But mainly for market reasons. 

 

5 years later, there are still many things that are not as efficient in France or Europe as they are in Silicon Valley, particularly the efficiency of late stage financing and the absence of an equivalent to NASDAQ. But as Romain articulates in this post, French entrepreneurs and VCs have understood how to work around these obstacles and with Silicon Valley.

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reza malekzadeh's curator insight, February 26, 4:41 PM

Great read by our friend @RomainSerman!

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Things Investopedia Co-Founder Wishes He Knew Prior To Selling His Company

Things Investopedia Co-Founder Wishes He Knew Prior To Selling His Company | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it

"In summary, I wish I’d known the following things when I sold my business:

  • That the surest way to leave value on the table would be to not hire a banker. The decision-making process should be how to choose the right advisor, not whether or not to have one.
  • In our deal, we created the most value through competition and non-exclusivity.
  • I would not hire a banker who claimed his advantage was relationships or contacts. Instead, look for other differentiating factors like negotiating skills."
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Great points made here and #2 is probably the most important (hence #3 as well). When we sold Musiwave, we first received inbound informal interest for a €30-€40M range. We ended up selling at €100M + earnout: not because we had supernatural powers but because we moved the conversation from one interested party to 3 competiting companies. 

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The 8 Must-Ask Customer Discovery Questions to Validate Product Market Fit of a Startup

The 8 Must-Ask Customer Discovery Questions to Validate Product Market Fit of a Startup | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it

All of these questions are customer and product discovery questions, almost identical to the ones product managers use to understand if the company has unlocked product-market fit.

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Understanding whether you truly have product-market fit is one of the topics I see entrepreneurs get delusional the most often (and yes, that includes me). We all have a tendency to believe in our own dreams and apply wishful thinking. These 8 questions are a great tool to keep us honest and understand where we still might have work to do to get customers locked on our product and our startup reday to scale. 

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The Importance of Payback Period for SaaS Startups

The Importance of Payback Period for SaaS Startups | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it
One of the most powerful levers for SaaS companies to master is payback period. Payback period is the number of months a company requires to payback its cost of customer acquisition. The median SaaS startup has a payback period of 15 months on a gross margin basis.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

These simulations will get you thinking. But who knows how short your payback period is when they start? Not many. The thing to focus on though is what you control. You probably can't change much to reduce your cost of acquiring customers but have you thought about the situations where you leave money on thre table when winning a deal? Segmenting your customers by size or needs and having offers to match can give you a much higher lifetime value for the same customer acquisition effort. 

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It's not you, it's them

It's not you, it's them | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it
TLDR:Fundraising is a filtering exercise, not a popularity contest.If you are a fintech startup, go East!Ask for feedback other than “the market size isn’t big enough.”Avoid VCs who ask for unit economics.Success is harder than failure.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
Interesting lessons learned from the team of eShares after completing their $7M Series A. Key insight (but also a dangerous one): it's often not your pitch which is wrong but the VCs you are pitching to. It's dangerous because it's easy to never listen to feedback and what's wrong with your pitch. But it's often true that VCs have investment strategies, preferences, pre-conceived ideas and many other biases that will make your pitch a success or a failure before it even started.
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Why and What About Should Startups Blog?

Why and What About Should Startups Blog? | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it
Startups often launch blogs without rhyme or reason. Here is the only rhyme and reason you need to succeed.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
An excellent answer by former Hubspot's Jay Acunzo. His best piece of advice is that entrepreneurs should think of their blogs as answering the same problem their product does. This is exactly what I've discovered as we developed Scoop.it (and our blog): just like the only reason your startup should exist is to solve a particular problem for a particular group of people, your blog should only exist to provide useful content to this same group of people on that same problem. You can even take this further and consider the followings:- your blog might be the best way to start your company: there are a more and more successful companies that started by building an audience before building products. Copyblogger is a good example. - If you can't add value to people by telling them how to solve their problem, it's very unlikely your product will. Blogging helps you not only tell things which your product don't necessarily does well but also understand your customers' needs and pain point.
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This is the Product Death Cycle. Why it happens, and how to break out of it

This is the Product Death Cycle. Why it happens, and how to break out of it | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it
The hardest part of any new product launch is the beginning, when it’s not quite working, and you’re iterating and molding the experience to fix it. It may be the hardest phase, but it’s also the most fun. The Product Death Cycle All of this was on my mind when I saw a great tweet from …
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Been there, done that...


And still seeing other entrepreneurs do the same mistake. 


One feature... One feature is all it takes. Adding new ones won't save your product. 

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Edwin Abdiel Rodz's curator insight, July 9, 2015 2:53 PM

If I ask you what's the process map of your product's life-cycle can you answer me with a structured answer?  


A simplification of the product life cycle is the process into what your product goes through from the point of development until it reaches the customer, ultimately starts declining in sales and returns feedback that will enhance the next version or triggers the closing of the product. 


Now, this process assumes your product sells.  This is why we're calling it a "Life cycle" but what happens if you don't sell? 


The idea posted by Andrew Chen and exposed by David Bland is that at the start of a product launch if your product doesn't sell it has fallen into the Death Cycle.  A process that (believe it or not) can benefit your product to the point of making the next version more profitable as long as you don't follow the mediocre three steps seeing on the top of the article.






 

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The Expanding Role of Marketing in SaaS Startups

The Expanding Role of Marketing in SaaS Startups | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it
The role of the marketing team within SaaS has stretched from simply engendering awareness and creating interest, to guiding customers much deeper into the funnel. Steve Patrizi created the schematic above that illustrates the idea beautifully.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

Marketing is taking a greater and greater lead (pun intended!) in SaaS companies as a part of the traditional scope of sales is shifting to marketers. That - plus the ability to understand product marketing through lean customer development - makes marketing skills a mus for SaaS founders. 

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9 Questions To Ask Before Taking A Job At A Start Up

9 Questions To Ask Before Taking A Job At A Start Up | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it
Imagine if someone asked "would you invest in this company?" Your answer is going to be similar. With a few additions.Here's the checklist I would follow.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
I love this guy. James Altucher has a way of making complex things crystal clear. Useful if you're considering working for a startup but also in symmetry if you're an entrepreneur looking to recruit.
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Colemi's curator insight, May 13, 2015 2:01 PM

9 Questions To Ask Before Taking A Job At A Start Up

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The building blocks of a Tech Ecosystem

The building blocks of a Tech Ecosystem | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it
The required components to have a vibrant and sustainable tech ecosystem from my presentation at #premoney
Guillaume Decugis's insight:
How are the various tech startup ecosystems different from Silicon Valley? This very often asked question is answered in details and nuance here. And it's much more subtle than "we lack VC money".
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Growth Is Optional: 10 Reasons Why Startups Fail At Growth

Growth Is Optional: 10 Reasons Why Startups Fail At Growth | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it

I bolded the words, “growth is optional”, for a reason.  I think this summarizes things so well. It might sound crazy because I’ve never met a company that says they don't want to grow.  But many don’t do the things required to grow.  It reminds me a lot of people who want to lose weight, stop smoking, or make some other major change in their life.   They have the desire, but not the will to do the hard things.   


The concepts behind growth are much simpler than most people think.  As with most things, it is executing that is the tough part.  Here are 10 things I’ve seen companies fail at executing that prevent them from growing.  

Guillaume Decugis's insight:

For having done a number of these mistakes myself, I find this is one of the best posts I've seen on that topic. 


Teams are made of a variety of people with different views and sensitivities. So when things don't turn out the way you want, it can be extremely hard to stay focused on the right things. 


#2 in particular is one thing I've seen many tech startups do, perhaps because a lot of them are engineering-driven at the core. They try to outcode themselves off a growth plateau through more features that will only get in the way and hurt their growth. 


If you're having doubts - or when you'll have doubts - this is a good checklist to go back to with your team. 

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Linda Buckmaster's curator insight, July 8, 2015 12:03 PM

Apparently many people don't do the things required to grow ...however, the concepts behind growth are much simpler than we think...

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Avoiding The SaaS Startup Graveyard: Three SaaS Sales Models

Avoiding The SaaS Startup Graveyard: Three SaaS Sales Models | Ideas for entrepreneurs | Scoop.it
Price and complexity define a strategic spectrum of sales approaches for SaaS startups that gravitate strongly toward three distinct SaaS sales models.
Guillaume Decugis's insight:

A classic but still very interesting read by Joel York. Saas startups who pick up one precise quadrant will be more focused and probably do a better job. But this doesn't mean they can't expand as they grow:

- for instance by expanding from Enterprise to Transactional as SalesForce did offering SMB plans,

- or by expanding from self-service to Transactional or Enterprise as Dropbox did after having built a strong presence with its consumer self-service product.

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Curated by Guillaume Decugis
Co-Founder & CEO @Scoopit. Entrepreneur (Musiwave, Goojet). Skier. Gamer. Blogging without blogging here: http://scoop.it/u/gdecugis
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I can't afford to buy all the cool geek stuff out there. So I collect them here instead. Feel free to suggest yours!
Good news from the Stars
To boldly go where only Astrophysicians have gone before. What I find interesting (and can roughly understand) in Astronomy & Space exploration these days.
Ideas for entrepreneurs
Serial entrepreneurship is constant learning. Here's what I found impacting.
Is the iPad a revolution?
Will it save the media? create new consumptions patterns?
Lean Content Marketing
Making the most efficient and effective use of strategies, tools, and technology for content marketing.
Online Gaming For The Win
Used to play a WoW paladin for years. Now looking at what will be the new trends in online gaming.
Scoop.it on the Web
Let's spread the love about Scoop.it
Scoop.it Team
Meet the Dream Scoop.it Team!
Showcase of custom topics
Beautiful topics with customization
Social Media Publishing and Curation
If you're just tweeting links, you're missing out. Discover and share with us useful resources to maximize the impact of the content we share.
Thought Leadership and Online Presence
Demonstrate Thought Leadership by Building your Online Presence; relation to Content Curation and Personal Branding