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iOS 7.0.2: Apple rolls out fix for lockscreen bypass bug

iOS 7.0.2: Apple rolls out fix for lockscreen bypass bug | ICT in the news | Scoop.it
Update comes six days after publicity surrounding bug which could let people hack into Facebook and Twitter accounts and photos. By Charles Arthur
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Apple iOS7 software review – video

Apple iOS7 software review – video | ICT in the news | Scoop.it
Guardian technology editor Charles Arthur takes a close-up look at Apple's overhaul of its iOS software for iPhone and iPad
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iPhone 5S – first impressions

iPhone 5S – first impressions | ICT in the news | Scoop.it
Samuel Gibbs: Apple's new flagship smartphone has some fresh features but you might be pushed to tell the difference from the iPhone 5 at first glance
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Next iPad will be narrower but retain screen size, leaked parts show

Next iPad will be narrower but retain screen size, leaked parts show | ICT in the news | Scoop.it
'iPad 5' is also thinner, while second-generation iPad mini looks almost identical to first version launched last year. By Charles Arthur
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Australia: Atomic clock may keep time at home | ScienceAlert

Australia: Atomic clock may keep time at home | ScienceAlert | ICT in the news | Scoop.it

A new development in fibre optic technology could soon bring atomic clock precision to any home or business with a fibre connection, according to researchers at The University of Western Australia and the University of Adelaide.

 

Assistant Professor Sascha Schediwy, from UWA's School of Physics, said the technology was no more complicated than that used in the National Broadband Network modems currently being installed in homes and businesses around Australia.

 

Published in the international Optics Letters journal, the paper's co-authors include researchers from the Australian National University, Macquarie University, the National Measurement Institute, and Australia's Academic and Research Network (AARNET).

 

Professor Schediwy said the researchers had discovered how to transmit timing signals generated from state-of-the-art atomic clocks, found in just a small number of top research laboratories, to potentially hundreds of end users simultaneously on existing optical fibre networks.

 

"The transmission system preserves the super-stability of these clocks, which only lose or gain a second after 3 billion years, a length of time comparable to the age of Earth.  Previous research aimed to send the clock signals to a single location, limiting their use to research applications," he said.

 

"However, as this new technique can be deployed alongside internet traffic, it is now possible to use existing fibre networks and make this available to the wider community."

 

Professor Schediwy said clocks were incredibly powerful tools for high-precision measurement, from fundamental research into Einstein's theory of general relativity to enabling cosmology with giant radio telescopes, such as the Square Kilometre Array.

 

They can also be used for exploration geophysics or to monitor climate change through measuring sea level rises and the thickness of ice sheets.

 

"In fact, time (or more accurately frequency) can be measured far more precisely than any other physical parameter," he said.  "This development could eventually lead to improvements in the performance of any application that requires stable time and frequency signals, including arrays of mobile phone towers, radar stations and internet exchanges.

 

"Atomic clocks are used much more commonly than people realise - they are integral in global positioning systems (GPS), telephone and internet exchanges, and financial systems."

 

Professor Schediwy said the technology could also potentially lead to massive improvements in indoor positioning systems (IPS).

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Tech firms to make Blu-ray successor

Tech firms to make Blu-ray successor | ICT in the news | Scoop.it
Sony and Panasonic outline plans to create an optical disc capable of holding at least six times the amount of data that Blu-ray does.
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First talking robot sent into space

First talking robot sent into space | ICT in the news | Scoop.it
Japan launches the world's first talking robot into space to serve as companion to astronaut Kochi Wakata who begins his ISSmission in November.
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18 Ways to Turn iPad/iPhone Into Cool Gaming Devices

18 Ways to Turn iPad/iPhone Into Cool Gaming Devices | ICT in the news | Scoop.it
With the glorious age of the iPhone comes first world gaming issues.
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Microsoft seeks to increase value in stock by buying back $40bn of shares

Microsoft seeks to increase value in stock by buying back $40bn of shares | ICT in the news | Scoop.it
Software giant seeks to appease investors concerned it is failing to capitalise on the smartphone boom
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iOS 7 review: looking to bigger things and swiping away the past

iOS 7 review: looking to bigger things and swiping away the past | ICT in the news | Scoop.it
With the original iPhone software nearly six years old, Apple has taken a bold step that hints at larger screens through the use of bright colours, swipe gestures and animation
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Samsung unveils Galaxy Gear as smartwatch race kicks off

Samsung unveils Galaxy Gear as smartwatch race kicks off | ICT in the news | Scoop.it
Samsung gets out ahead with launch of Android-powered device in bid not to be left behind in case Apple gets in the game
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Samsung readies smartwatch range

Samsung readies smartwatch range | ICT in the news | Scoop.it
Unearthed patent and trademark filings reveal a possible design for Samsung's forthcoming smartwatch.
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UK smartphone users wary of 4G

UK smartphone users wary of 4G | ICT in the news | Scoop.it
Almost two thirds of UK citizens with smartphones have no plans to upgrade to next generation mobile services, according to Ofcom
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Apple update to tackle power attack

Apple update to tackle power attack | ICT in the news | Scoop.it
Apple plans to issue a software update that will help its products avoid falling victim to booby-trapped power chargers.
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First Leaked Image of Logitech's iOS Game Controller - IGN

First Leaked Image of Logitech's iOS Game Controller - IGN | ICT in the news | Scoop.it
Apple recently announced plans to support third-party game controllers with iOS 7, and this appears to be an image of the first one from Logitech.
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InAVate - Printed poster lets you play the drums

Audio visual technology solutions for an integrated world
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A British firm has given a new lease of life to paper by combining traditional print with conventional electronics to create a touch-based interactive poster.
Novalia, which is raising funds to put the technology into production, has created a prototype that lets users play seven different drums on the poster by touching them. Users can also play them wirelessly through their iOS device by connecting an iPad or iPhone.
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