ICT for Education and Development
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June 13, 2013: IJEDICT Weekly News is out

June 13, 2013: IJEDICT Weekly News is out | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it

"IJEDICT Weekly News", by Stewart Marshall: A free online newspaper with a curated selection of articles, blog posts, videos and photos about ICT for education and development.

 

Read and subscribe free online at: http://paper.li/f-1325685118

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ICT for Education and Development
How ICT is being used for education and development. [ Also see: http://www.bestonlinecourses.info ]
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[TEDxTalks] The brave new world of Online Learning (Amy Collier)

Amy Collier works with faculty, instructional designers and doctoral students to explore and design online learning experiences at Stanford.

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shazia.wj's curator insight, August 22, 8:22 AM
The brave new world of Online Learning (Amy Collier)
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Free Technology for Teachers: Six Good Places to Find Free Music and Sound Effects

Free Technology for Teachers: Six Good Places to Find Free Music and Sound Effects | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
Picking the right music or sound effects can have a drastic influence on how we react to a scene in a video. Here are some places that you and your students can find free sound effects and music to download and use in video projects.

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Willem Kuypers's curator insight, August 27, 4:15 AM
Toujours bon d'avoir quelques adresses pour de la musique et des sons gratuits.
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[VIDEO] 5 technologies that will change Classroom Education

The potential for new technology in the classroom is really cool – and also kind of creepy. Here are five technologies that could dramatically change the way we learn.

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Edumorfosis's curator insight, August 20, 2:38 PM

Cuando estas cinco grandes tecnologías lleguen al aula, la sociedad estárá en una dimensión transhumanista completamente difertente a lo que se practicará en el Sistema Educativo....

David W. Deeds's curator insight, August 20, 6:51 PM

Thanks to Juan Doming.

Educity Pedagogy's curator insight, August 22, 11:52 PM
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New Models of Open and Distance Learning ~ Stephen Downes

New Models of Open and Distance Learning ~ Stephen Downes | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
Online learning, new media, connectivism, MOOCs, personal learning environments, new literacy, and more from Stephen Downes

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What’s the best way to display PowerPoint on my iPad?

What’s the best way to display PowerPoint on my iPad? | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
The peeps in Seattle have been big enough to set aside their differences, creating the new PowerPoint app for mobile devices.
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The British Library Puts 1,000,000 Images into the Public Domain, Making Them Free to Reuse & Remix

The British Library Puts 1,000,000 Images into the Public Domain, Making Them Free to Reuse & Remix | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it


Earlier this week, Oxford's Bodleian Library announced that it had digitized a 550 year old copy of the Gutenberg Bible along with a number of other ancient bibles, some of them quite beautiful. Not to be outdone, the British Library came out with its own announcement on Thursday:

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[PDF] The paradox of classroom technology

[PDF] The paradox of classroom technology | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
Learners’ use of digital tools and other technology to support their learning in our K-12 systems continues to be sporadic and often not observed despite the proliferation of use outside of school. Based on an analysis of three years of direct classroom observations in K-12 schools across 39 states and 11 countries, AdvancED found there are still relatively few classrooms in which the use of digital tools and technology is a regular part of a student’s school experience. In more than half (52.7 percent) of classrooms direct observations show no evidence students are using technology to gather, evaluate, or use information for learning; two-thirds of classrooms show no evidence of students using technology to solve problems, conduct research, or to work collaboratively.
 
Trained and certified observers conduct classroom observations as a part of AdvancED’s continuous improvement process which could include STEM Certification, accreditation, readiness and/or diagnostic review. Each observation lasts a minimum of 20 minutes during which observers use the learner-centric eProve™ Effective Learning Environments Observation Tool® (eleot®) to gather data focused on the activities learners are engaged in, their discussions and interactions, resources they are using for learning, their behaviors and dispositions during the learning process, etc. Observers rate each of the 30 eleot items on a four-point scale where 4 = Very Evident, 3 = Evident, 2 = Somewhat Evident and 1 = Not Observed

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Víctor Xepiti Eme's curator insight, August 1, 12:13 AM
We need to ensure that teachers are provided support and training so that they know how to integrate students’ use of technology into their classrooms and create a student-centric learning environment. Until teachers and administrators
are convinced that technology can be a help not a hindrance to learning, the shift will not happen.
The teacher is the key to students successfully using technology as a learning and problem-solving tool. Students thrive when the teacher requires students to use technology not only for researching and writing but also to solve problems, work collaboratively and develop creativity
malek's curator insight, August 4, 9:52 AM

While numerous surveys suggest that the pervasive use of tablets, smartphones, laptops and digital education content in the classroom is expanding and changing the role of teachers, the AdvancED study found little evidence of technology being used by students to strengthen learning in classrooms today.

Plagiarism Software Org's comment, August 19, 12:57 AM
Lost Google Top rank or Unable to getting First Page Rank. The most problem behind this is duplicate content. So, I would like to suggest you check your contents are not Plagiarized. Check by http://plagiarismsoftware.org/
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How Technology Benefits Learning

How Technology Benefits Learning | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
Wondering how Technology Benefits Learning? Check some of the countless ways in which Technology Benefits Learning and makes it more engaging and effective.

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António Leça Domingues's curator insight, August 2, 4:59 AM
Como a tecnologia beneficia a educação.
Educity Pedagogy's curator insight, August 4, 12:16 AM
A educitypedagogy also provide  a new way of  study of competitive exam preparation  it provide application which is a lot collection of audio video to study for student  http://bit.ly/2ajHbWw  
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What Makes e-Learning Work?

What Makes e-Learning Work? | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
Ethan Edwards discusses the characteristics that make up good e-learning.

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Tony Guzman's curator insight, August 7, 10:28 PM
While many would consider the needs for successful eLearning different than traditional learning this article shows that not to necessarily be the case.
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The best augmented reality apps that aren't Pokemon GO

The best augmented reality apps that aren't Pokemon GO | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
Pokemon GO isn't the only app that seamlessly blends virtual objects into the real world.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, July 31, 12:02 PM
Pokemon GO isn't the only app that seamlessly blends virtual objects into the real world.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/la-realite-augmentee-augmented-reality-ar

 

 

Vittorio Canavese's curator insight, July 31, 12:42 PM
Non solo Pokemon Go
Tony Guzman's curator insight, August 1, 8:25 PM
While Pokémon GO has became a cultural phenomenon, it is not the first, nor the last, augmented reality application.
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Platforms Have Transformed the Economy. Is Education Next?

Platforms Have Transformed the Economy. Is Education Next? | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
Like higher education, most K-12 platform deployments are examples of ‘technology integration’ rather than transformation. They facilitate textbook replacement and open content utilization. Strong deployment support personalization and extend learning.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 27, 12:50 AM

Interesting perspective on the LMS.

Fiona Harvey's curator insight, July 27, 4:48 AM
Think this is a great article - highlighting a disconnect between what we need and what we want to have. HE Is slow to respond which doesn't help change anything. Worth taking a look at.
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, July 29, 6:40 AM
Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
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Online Grammar Tools

Online Grammar Tools | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it

I hope you enjoy these sites and find them useful. If you want more grammar related sites just click the link to see more Grammar links


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DocAten's curator insight, July 25, 10:13 AM
Allez, on révise son anglais et en particulier la grammaire !
Educity Pedagogy's curator insight, July 27, 12:24 AM
I hope one another website to provide study material for banking sector, see it  http://www.oureducity.com/
Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, July 27, 11:29 AM
These sites can be useful for ESL/EFL students.  Videos of grammar explanations and exercises in Grammar Flip can be helpful for independent practice.
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University students and faculty have positive perceptions of open/ alternative resources and their utilization in a textbook replacement initiative | Delimont | Research in Learning Technology

University students and faculty have positive perceptions of open/ alternative resources and their utilization in a textbook replacement initiative | Delimont | Research in Learning Technology | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
The objective of this study was to determine the perceptions towards OAERs and the initiative, of students enrolled in, and faculty members teaching, courses using OAERs.

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MMT 2 : Augmented Reality (AR) in Education

In this MMT we will be looking at Augmented Reality and its implications in the classroom. The four apps we will be looking at are:ColarMix, 4D Anatomy, 4D ...

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Lee Hall's curator insight, August 26, 11:17 AM
Augmented Reality makes it so easy to be able to visualize than a flat picture in a book. For example, being able to turn a beating heart is amazing. 
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Explaining the Research of Connected Learning - DML Central

Explaining the Research of Connected Learning - DML Central | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
Digital Media + Learning: The Power of Participation

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Nik Peachey's Educational Technology Newsletter - August 18th 2016

Nik Peachey's Educational Technology Newsletter - August 18th 2016 | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
In this newsletter I have links to 7 new educational tools and 7 of the most interesting learning and tech related articles and ebooks.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 19, 3:01 AM

My latest free edtech newsletter.

Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, August 19, 2:24 PM
Always worth checking out. 
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7 Important Questions Before Implementing Digital Portfolios

7 Important Questions Before Implementing Digital Portfolios | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
Digital portfolios are something that are really starting to take off in schools. There are different software programs that will make “portfolios” easy to share, yet do we truly embrace the power that a digital portfolio can bring into our schools? Since it is “digital”, we need to go beyond a portfolio that only represents one year of learning, but can show the progression over time.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 18, 1:08 AM

Some interesting thoughts on portfolios

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, August 20, 5:19 AM
Quelques bonnes questions à se poser en cas d'utilisation d'un portofolio numérique.
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44 QR Codes Resources For Teaching & Learning

44 QR Codes Resources For Teaching & Learning | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
While the potential is great, in short a QR Code is a physical link that can be scanned by smartphones or tablets in mobile learning circumstances. The following list from listly user Marianna Talei offers a huge variety of QR resources, from QR code generators to attaching images and hosting QR code treasure hunts.

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Teaching with Graphic Novels 

Teaching with Graphic Novels  | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
Modern graphic novels have emerged as effective teaching tools that help improve literacy, explain complex concepts, and get students excited about reading.

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HCL's curator insight, August 14, 7:07 PM
Graphic novels can provide students with a number of reading benefits because of their unique style and presentation... they can improve literacy, explain complex concepts, and get students excited about reading.
Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, August 15, 2:29 AM

"Visual Storytelling Can Build Non-Visual Reading Skills


Although often grouped together, a graphic novel is not the same as a comic book. Unlike the Sunday comic stripes or short serialized superhero stories, graphic novels contain all of the aspects of any school-assigned book: a beginning, a middle, an end, conflict, character development, resolution, and many other literary characteristics. However, graphic novels often use panels and images to also tell the story.

“The most significant difference from a comic is that the graphic novel’s text is both written and visual,” English teacher Cat Turner explained to the National Council of Teachers of English. “Every part of each frame plays a role in the interpretation of the text, and hence, graphic novels actually demand sophisticated readers.”

 

This more diverse and complex style of storytelling may be especially beneficial to students who struggle with large sections of text. The combinations of short lines of text and images throughout may deliver the same information to a student as a lengthy paragraph, but feel more palatable.

 

Due to space limitations in a panel on on the page, graphic novels also showcase efficient writing, mirroring a habit that readers can practice themselves. The unique combination of image and text can also improve comprehension and even vocabulary, as students have more context to derive their clues from. The School Library Journal noted one example of graphic novels in the classroom where an educator gave half the class Hamlet as the traditional text and the rest the graphic novelization. Those who read the graphic novel spent almost one fewer hour reading and scored higher on a comprehension quiz later.

 

Some educators argue that reading through images can be just as important as learning to read through text, particularly with the proliferation of visual media. Graphic novels also provide nontraditional learners an opportunity to get excited about reading and thrive via the mixed medium.

 

“Graphic novels can be a way in for students who are difficult to reach through traditional texts,” educational publisher Scholastic explained. “Even those deemed poor readers willingly and enthusiastically gravitate toward these books. Readers who are not interested in reading or who, despite being capable of reading, prefer gaming or watching media, can be pulled into a story by the visual elements of graphic novels.”

 

When Graphic Novels Are Too Graphic
One of the major criticism over graphic novels is the depiction of violent, graphic, racy, or scandalous images. Some of the most famous graphic novels, such as the Watchmen and Persepolis, feature scenes or stories of serious violence.

 

However, advocates of graphic novels argue that the issue is often not with the content but the presentation. As SLJ noted, the problem may be what researcher Steven Cary calls the “naked buns” effect. This is a paradox where the text of the phrase “naked buns” is not perceived as offensive or indecent while the illustration of the phrase would be. It is the image not the concept that can lead to controversy.

 

In the past, the graphic memoir Fun Home has faced controversy when it was assigned as reading for college students due to its depiction of sex. Fellow autobiographical graphic novel Persepolis has also been protested when assigned to middle school students because of a scene involving torture. Following the “naked buns” argument, this content may only be seen as more offensive than traditional novels because of its illustration of the concepts versus its discussion of them.

However, many books that have been banned or censored throughout history in U.S. are now looked at as literary masterpieces and assigned regularly, such as The Canterbury Tales , The Grapes of Wrath , and the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn .

 

 

Ways to Begin Integrating Comics Into Curriculum
Graphic novels can provide students with a number of reading benefits because of their unique style and presentation, but this also makes it more difficult for educators to incorporate these works into their curriculum.

 

Shelley Hong Xu, associate professor in the department of teacher education at California State University, Long Beach, recommended that teachers start slow and learn more about graphic novels in general, according to the NCTE. Xu advocates for educators to spend time reading a graphic novel and noting their own comprehension skills.

 

“I think that every preservice and inservice teacher needs to experience this activity in order to better understand literacy knowledge and skills that students use with reading comics and graphic novels,” Xu said.

 

Teachers should also learn about the genre of graphic novels and what their students are most interested in learning or what their experience with the genre is. There are a number of graphic novels that are directly focused on historic events and may act as teaching tools on their own, but there are many others that would be meritless in the classroom.

 

Teachers who want to incorporate graphic novels into the curriculum should also expect some pushback from parents and administrators, Xu argued. Educators should explain how these texts can help students reach their education goals, improve reading comprehension, and provide other benefits. Students may be less likely to push back about the inclusion of graphic novels in class, but educators should be prepared to coach students on how to read graphic novels and deal with other difficulties that may arise.

 

Although graphic novels are unlikely to cure modern reading issues in the classroom, their unique style of storytelling and more exciting visual medium can help address specific pain points by attracting a wider variety of readers, leading to more consistent recreational reading and creating healthy reading habits."

Tina Jameson's curator insight, August 18, 7:08 PM
An interesting assessment of the effectiveness of using and analyzing graphic novels in the classroom, and of the controversial nature of the material that may also face educators.  However the writer of the article clearly sees the value of using graphic novels as a teaching tool.
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On This Day 25-years Ago, The World's First Website Went Online

On This Day 25-years Ago, The World's First Website Went Online | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
On this day 25 years ago, August 6, 1991, the world's first website created by Tim Berners-Lee went live

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Gust MEES's curator insight, August 6, 8:10 AM

On this day 25 years ago, August 6, 1991, the world's first website created by Tim Berners-Lee went live

Tony Guzman's curator insight, August 7, 10:34 PM
The World Wide Web (WWW) turned 25 years old this weekend. WOW! Happy Birthday WWW!
Prometheus's curator insight, August 9, 4:24 PM
...and where would we be without it...one wonders..
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Moocs can transform education – but not yet

Moocs can transform education – but not yet | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
Whether or not Moocs live up to the hype, technology’s impact on universities is real and growing, Stanford University’s John Hennessy tells Ellie Bothwell

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, August 1, 7:36 AM

The future is...still downloading

 

The hype around massive open online courses “didn’t quite get it right”, admits Rick Levin, chief executive of Coursera, the world’s largest Mooc provider. The idea that internet-based learning would swiftly displace traditional universities, and that a selection of online certificates would replace an undergraduate degree, was “a mistaken idea from the beginning”.

 

But the economist, who spent a record 20 years as president of Yale University before stepping down in 2013, still believes that Moocs can have a transformative impact on higher education: it’s just that the revolutionary scenario predicted by so many might take a “couple of decades” to become a reality.

 

Coursera has accrued 18 million users worldwide since it was founded in 2012 by two Stanford University computer scientists, Andrew Ng and Daphne Koller. It currently has more than 1,000 courses open for enrolment, delivered by more than 140 educational institutions, including many prestigious institutions within the US and beyond.

 

Levin tells Times Higher Education that Moocs are already having a significant impact in the realm of professional development, with many of Coursera’s existing courses focusing on areas such as business, computer science and data science. But the company has also been expanding into fields such as arts and humanities and language learning.

 

The natural next step, says Levin, is the development of online-only postgraduate degrees. Earlier this year, Coursera started offering an MBA and a master’s of computer science in data science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and it is likely that more professionally focused master’s degrees will follow. Tuition fees on these courses stand at about $20,000 (£15,140), significantly cheaper than the on-campus equivalent. “I think more people will find it convenient to take these degrees online rather than in school,” says Levin.

 

The inevitable next question is whether students will be able to study for undergraduate degrees via Coursera. Levin thinks this will happen. He acknowledges it could inflict damage on “middle- and lower-tier institutions”, but adds, “I don’t see that coming for quite a while yet”.

 

Levin was a proponent of online education long before he took up his role at Coursera in 2014. He pioneered the development of online education at Yale, in partnership with Stanford and the University of Oxford, and went on to set up Open Yale Courses, which offers free access to introductory courses taught by the institution’s academics.

 

For leading universities, online courses will serve mainly to “magnify their impact”, Levin believes. “Now, Yale professors, instead of teaching a 15-person seminar three or four times a year, can teach 6,000 people in one sitting. Some Coursera teachers teach more people in one class on Coursera than they teach in their entire career on campus.”

 

The development of paid-for online degrees represents an evolution of the original open model, says Levin, which offers significantly increased coaching and support for students. Coursera has also recently introduced charges of up to $99 for learners who want to submit assignments on a number of its Moocs. Students who do not pay still have access to the course materials, but do not receive a completion certificate.

These developments could be seen to be raising questions about whether Coursera is remaining true to its core mission, to provide “universal access to the world’s best education”. But Levin highlights that more than 100,000 students who could not afford to pay for certification had their fees waived last year.

 

As for Coursera’s impact in the developing world, around 55 per cent of the students enrolled on its current Moocs are from developed countries – although that proportion is declining. A University of Pennsylvania survey of students on the institution’s first 32 Coursera Moocs, published in 2014, found that nearly 80 per cent of learners already had a bachelor’s degree and 44 per cent had a higher degree, leading the authors to conclude that “the individuals the Mooc revolution is supposed to help most – those without access to higher education in developing countries – are conspicuously underrepresented among the early adopters”.

 

Levin points to research by Coursera staff and US academics, published last year in the Harvard Business Review, which found that learners without degrees in developing countries reported greater benefit from their courses, in educational and career terms, than the more privileged students. “We’re finding really very heartening results…It would be great if we could see more learners in developing countries without a college education, but we are certainly having a disproportionate impact on people of that type,” he says.

 

If Moocs are to have the transformational impact that Levin desires, the key issue of retention will also have to be addressed. It has been observed that Mooc completion rates of, on average, 6.8 per cent, are only slightly higher than the dropout rate for the UK higher education as a whole. Levin argues that this is an unfair comparison, because many people sign up to Moocs, typically free of charge, to explore the course materials with no intention of gaining certification at the end. A much fairer comparison, he says, would be to look at the completion rate for users who complete the first week of a programme and say that they intend to stay the course. On this measure, Coursera’s completion rate is in the “mid-double digits” – but Levin accepts that it needs to improve further.

 

“We are constantly striving to improve the quality of our courses, to pay attention to where people drop out,” he says. “If people are getting through the first two weeks and then dropping off, there is something wrong with that part of the course. Completion rates have been rising steadily, especially over the last few years, as we focus on that.”

 

It is clear that continuing innovation will be needed if Coursera is indeed to live up to the initial hype surrounding Moocs. But, despite launching many initiatives at Yale, Levin admits that the trial-and-error process of evolving an internet start-up is a “new experience” for him.

 

“At Yale, with [its] extraordinary reputation, even with ambitious initiatives there was always time to bring constituencies on board to ‘de-risk’ major changes before we launched them,” he says. “We don’t have that luxury in a start-up; things move fast and we have competition. We need to try things all the time and, if things don’t work, we have to reverse course and try something else.”

 

Denis Lundie's curator insight, August 5, 3:29 AM
Now that the hype and histeria are subsiding, the value and positioning of MOOCs in the education ecosystem can be better evaluated for strategic planning.
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What is open source? — Open Words

What is open source? — Open Words | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
Over the last few years, I’ve been a part of lots of discussions — across domains, from technology to journalism and education — about…

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How this state is turning its virtual teachers into online learning experts

How this state is turning its virtual teachers into online learning experts | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it
A certification program is creating a new generation of online learning savants. How are they doing it?

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Free HTML5 Online Animation Maker, Banner Maker and Video Maker | Animatron

Free HTML5 Online Animation Maker, Banner Maker and Video Maker | Animatron | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it

Make engaging and compelling animations online for your business or school. Create explainer videos, animated marketing videos, training videos and presentations. Make HTML5 banners and interactive video content.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 15, 12:48 AM

This looks good. You can make up to 5 public projects on the free account.

António Leça Domingues's curator insight, July 16, 4:12 AM
Aplicação de animação gráfica web gratuita.
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Augmented Reality and Web 3.0

Augmented Reality and Web 3.0 | ICT for Education and Development | Scoop.it

Augmented reality could open up huge potential for education outside of the classroom and enable students to learn and interact with whatever is in their immediate physical environment at any particular time. It could also transform publishing and the way we interact with books and images by enabling us to transform them into interactive multimedia.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 19, 4:54 AM

My article on Augmented Reality from back in 2011.

Vasi Doncheva's curator insight, August 19, 11:15 PM

My article on Augmented Reality from back in 2011.