ICT essays
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5 Good Health Apps for Your iPad ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

5 Good Health Apps for Your iPad ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | ICT essays | Scoop.it

"The iPad apps I have for you today have nothing to do with educational technology or mobile learning. These are some popular apps to check and control your health right from your iPad or iPhone. The app store is teeming with thousands of health apps but the ones below are the ones I have tried myself. Check them out"


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BBC News - Could new technology alienate the disabled?

Jeff Hall has 'locked-in syndrome' and uses one finger to communicate with the world. He worries that some technological developments could alienate disabled people like him further.


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BBC News - Can train technology reinvent the wheel?

BBC News - Can train technology reinvent the wheel? | ICT essays | Scoop.it
Britain may already be looking to make its railways quicker but a new wave of transport ideas - from ones already in development to "concept" contraptions - could change the way we commute forever.

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
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Underwater wi-fi given test run | BBC Tech News

Underwater wi-fi given test run | BBC Tech News | ICT essays | Scoop.it

Researchers have tested an "underwater wi-fi" network in a lake in an attempt to make a "deep-sea internet".

 

The team, from the University of Buffalo, New York, said the technology could help detect tsunamis, offering more reliable warning systems.

 

They aim to create an agreed standard for underwater communications, to make interaction and data-sharing easier.

 

Unlike normal wi-fi, which uses radio waves, the submerged network technology utilises sound waves.

 

Radio waves are able to penetrate water, but with severely limited range and stability. Sound waves provide a better option - as demonstrated by many aquatic species such as whales and dolphins.

 

Wireless communication underwater has been possible for some time, but the problem lies in getting separate systems used by different organisations to communicate with each other.

 

The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), for instance, uses acoustic waves to send data from tsunami sensors on the sea floor to buoys on the surface.

 

However due to infrastructure differences, this data cannot be shared quickly with other information gathered by the US Navy.


Therefore, the University of Buffalo team is attempting to create a shared standard.

 

"A submerged wireless network will give us an unprecedented ability to collect and analyse data from our oceans in real time," said Tommaso Melodia, lead researcher.

 

"Making this information available to anyone with a smartphone or computer, especially when a tsunami or other type of disaster occurs, could help save lives."

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Traffic ticket for Glass wearer

Traffic ticket for Glass wearer | ICT essays | Scoop.it
A Californian woman has been issued with a traffic ticket for driving while wearing Google Glass.

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UK town to get driverless cars

UK town to get driverless cars | ICT essays | Scoop.it
Driverless cars will be tested for the first time in a UK town after £1.5m is made available from the government.

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Canada: Broadband grant comes through | Rossland, BC News

Canada: Broadband grant comes through | Rossland, BC News | ICT essays | Scoop.it

You could call it manna from heaven.

 

The lynch pin needed to secure the installation of broadband in Rossland has arrived.

 

Mayor Greg Granstrom confirmed Monday that a $50,000 grant from the Southern Interior Development Initiative Trust (SIDIT) has come through to help fund the cost of the creation of broadband Internet in downtown Rossland.

 

The hard work of councilor Jody Blomme and the city’s Broadband Task Force has been realized after sending out two sizable grant applications in mid summer, said Granstrom.

 

“We are very excited,” he said. “This was the culmination of a lot of hours of meetings and discussion … and now I’m convinced it will become a real big economic driver for the city.”

 

The recommendation of the city’s Broadband Task Force—the broadest scenario available for start up—became the directive of the City of Rossland in a council vote Sept. 23.

 

But council approved the introduction of broadband Internet in the city with a caveat on option A, subject to the receipt of a minimum grant of $50,000.

 

With that grant now in hand, the city will enter into the pole permit agreement with Fortis immediately, and proceed with recommended build plan recommended by the task force.

 

City staff will also bring forward a bylaw authorizing the borrowing of up to $112,000 with a five-year term.

 

The option mitigates the risk of delaying a pole permit agreement with Fortis, and ensures the project can proceed.

 

The task force iterated that the option was the closest of any to the objectives outlined in the Official Community Plan goals for Community Economic Development.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Underwater wi-fi given test run | BBC Tech News

Underwater wi-fi given test run | BBC Tech News | ICT essays | Scoop.it

Researchers have tested an "underwater wi-fi" network in a lake in an attempt to make a "deep-sea internet".

 

The team, from the University of Buffalo, New York, said the technology could help detect tsunamis, offering more reliable warning systems.

 

They aim to create an agreed standard for underwater communications, to make interaction and data-sharing easier.

 

Unlike normal wi-fi, which uses radio waves, the submerged network technology utilises sound waves.

 

Radio waves are able to penetrate water, but with severely limited range and stability. Sound waves provide a better option - as demonstrated by many aquatic species such as whales and dolphins.

 

Wireless communication underwater has been possible for some time, but the problem lies in getting separate systems used by different organisations to communicate with each other.

 

The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), for instance, uses acoustic waves to send data from tsunami sensors on the sea floor to buoys on the surface.

 

However due to infrastructure differences, this data cannot be shared quickly with other information gathered by the US Navy.


Therefore, the University of Buffalo team is attempting to create a shared standard.

 

"A submerged wireless network will give us an unprecedented ability to collect and analyse data from our oceans in real time," said Tommaso Melodia, lead researcher.

 

"Making this information available to anyone with a smartphone or computer, especially when a tsunami or other type of disaster occurs, could help save lives."

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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World's first real 3D-printed gun fires more than 50 rounds

World's first real 3D-printed gun fires more than 50 rounds | ICT essays | Scoop.it
In a breakthrough for 3D-printing technology, the world's first working metal gun has been created (http://t.co/SBUz089fcv)

Via TechinBiz
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JAMIEWHITTLE's curator insight, November 8, 2013 9:20 AM

bad for peoples health if  they get shot by one

 

optionsciencepo's curator insight, November 8, 2013 9:34 AM

Pierre Raphael technologie

 

Everett Dalton's curator insight, November 8, 2013 10:05 AM

wow that looks like something off men in black..lol

---

Everett Dalton, IBO

http://www.wakeup2mca.com

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BBC News - Can train technology re-invent the wheel?

BBC News - Can train technology re-invent the wheel? | ICT essays | Scoop.it
Britain may already be looking to make its railways quicker but a new wave of transport ideas - from ones already in development to "concept" contraptions - could change the way we commute forever.

Via Andrew Dolinski
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Reinventing the classroom for the internet generation | BBC News

Reinventing the classroom for the internet generation | BBC News | ICT essays | Scoop.it

How do you teach a generation of children who have not known life without the internet? By ditching the traditional ways and thinking, argues Sugata Mitra.

 

The school Mitra wants to make, the school in the clouds, will not have teachers in the classroom. Teachers will be beamed in through Skype, the advantage being that a good quality teacher can be sent to any school on the planet, whether it is deep in the jungle or high on a mountain.

 

According to Mitra, children could be taught in a classroom or a facility or gathered together at home. If you get, say eight children together, the counterintuitive measure is to only give then two computers not one each, as this will facilitate discussion.

 

Physical teachers are good, but in most remote places the quality of teacher will be lower than what you can recruit in the cloud. Mitra says that children aged 8-12 years don’t seem to mind. This young generation thinks differently about the need for a traditional teacher than we do. Interms of visions for future education it’s the older generation that thinks like dinosaurs.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Roller coaster technology: 'Bigger! Faster! Scarier!' - BBC News

Roller coaster technology: 'Bigger! Faster! Scarier!' - BBC News | ICT essays | Scoop.it
Roller coaster technology: 'Bigger! Faster! Scarier!'
BBC News
Technology has transformed the theme park thrill ride, fuelling a global arms race to create the fastest, tallest, scariest roller coasters the world has ever known.

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Taxpayers 'ripped off' on broadband

Taxpayers 'ripped off' on broadband | ICT essays | Scoop.it
Taxpayers are being "ripped off" over the cost of a government scheme to extend high-speed broadband to rural areas, a group of MPs warns.

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BBC newsreader Simon McCoy mistakes photocopier paper for iPad

BBC newsreader Simon McCoy mistakes photocopier paper for iPad | ICT essays | Scoop.it
BBC news presenter Simon McCoy left viewers baffled today when he presented a report while carrying a stack of photocopier paper - after mistaking it for an iPad.

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Reinventing the classroom for the internet generation | BBC News

Reinventing the classroom for the internet generation | BBC News | ICT essays | Scoop.it

How do you teach a generation of children who have not known life without the internet? By ditching the traditional ways and thinking, argues Sugata Mitra.

 

The school Mitra wants to make, the school in the clouds, will not have teachers in the classroom. Teachers will be beamed in through Skype, the advantage being that a good quality teacher can be sent to any school on the planet, whether it is deep in the jungle or high on a mountain.

 

According to Mitra, children could be taught in a classroom or a facility or gathered together at home. If you get, say eight children together, the counterintuitive measure is to only give then two computers not one each, as this will facilitate discussion.

 

Physical teachers are good, but in most remote places the quality of teacher will be lower than what you can recruit in the cloud. Mitra says that children aged 8-12 years don’t seem to mind. This young generation thinks differently about the need for a traditional teacher than we do. Interms of visions for future education it’s the older generation that thinks like dinosaurs.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Rescooped by Rob Castle from ICT
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Taxpayers 'ripped off' on broadband

Taxpayers 'ripped off' on broadband | ICT essays | Scoop.it
Taxpayers are being "ripped off" over the cost of a government scheme to extend high-speed broadband to rural areas, a group of MPs warns.

Via PhillippoICT
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