ICT based doctor-patient communication
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Patient information to go online in government hospitals

Patient information to go online in government hospitals | ICT based doctor-patient communication | Scoop.it

Soon, patients of Coimbatore Medical College and Hospital will not have to run from pillar to post with their entire case files to get treated. They can be paper-free when they come in for check-ups as all patient details would be available online.

A hospital management information system would be implemented at GH within a month or so, according to hospital sources.

On the first hospital visit, every patient would be registered in the system with name, photograph and basic health details.


Information recorded for each patient would include his ailment and treatment received. Subsequently, all patient details, including scans, tests and results would be updated into the database.

"The software would allow even scan copies to be uploaded and added to a patient's database, so it would be easy for the consultant to access all the data with the click of a mouse instead of poring over through different reports in a file," said a doctor.

When a patient gets registered, he will be given an identity card with an identification number. Whenever he visits any department in the hospital, he just has to show his card and number.

They would immediately access all his details.

"This is extremely helpful in the pharmacy, labs and scan centres, where sometimes patients do not know how to ask for the right test or scan and if the prescription written is illegible," said another doctor.

The hospital is likely to get around 180 computers for the system. Since GH is always congested with patients and doctors may not have time to key-in updates and details, especially during outpatient hours, they are planning to ask house surgeons and PG surgeons to help for this purpose.


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Comment on What did people wear in the 80s? by Belle

Comment on What did people wear in the 80s? by Belle | ICT based doctor-patient communication | Scoop.it
What about catsuits?? Were they 80s?
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Apollo Hospitals working on linking e-health records with Aadhaar

Apollo Hospitals working on linking e-health records with Aadhaar | ICT based doctor-patient communication | Scoop.it

Apollo Hospitals is spearheading an initiative to link the health records of patients with the Aadhaar identification system.

 

The hospital group’s Executive Director-Operations, Sangita Reddy, is personally involved in rallying the various industry bodies (FICCI, CII and Nasscom) towards creating a national pool of electronic health records which can be linked to the Aadhaar.

 

Currently, different hospitals are working with various software firms to create their own system of electronic health records (digital documentation of patient’s medical history). This only leads to islands of automation which do not connect, said Reddy in an interview to Business Line. But when you link the records with the unique ID system (Aadhaar), it creates a nationalised resource pool with data pouring in from different locations.

 

For instance, a patient may come to Apollo for a particular treatment. But he or she may also go to other medical institutions for other procedures. Having a single unique ID helps integrates across the IT systems of all these institutions; this saves critical time and effort in patient care, said Reddy.

 
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Health on the move

Health on the move | ICT based doctor-patient communication | Scoop.it

Mobile telephony is not a panacea for all health challenges in the developing world. But there is enough experience – and the beginnings of an evidence base – to argue that mHealth deserves serious attention from any development actor seeking to improve global health.

 

A policy briefing focusing on how the mobile phone offers important opportunities for saving lives, drawing on BBC Media Action's direct experience in using phones to improve health education in one of the poorest states of India.

 

This briefing focuses on how one of the greatest engines of innovation in the 21st century – the mobile phone – provides a high-impact solution to save lives. It identifies three aspects of mHealth – the delivery of healthcare information and services via mobile communication devices – that renders it such a potentially robust healthcare tool:

 

• Reach. The first is its capacity to leverage existing – and quite basic – phones to provide life-saving information to people in difficult-to-reach, rural areas.

 

• Design. The second is its capacity to tailor both the delivery and content of that information to the needs of poor, illiterate and marginalised populations.

 

• Scale. The third is its capacity to operate at scale in a cost-effective, financially sustainable way.

 

 


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Health care in India skewed towards urban residents: Study

The provision of health care services in India is skewed towards urban residents who constitute about one-third of the country’s population, a new study says.

 

Urban residents, who make up 28 percent of India’s population, have access to 66 percent of the country’s available hospital beds, according to the study by IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics released here Friday.

 

The study also shows that the distribution of healthcare providers including doctors, nurses and pharmacists is highly concentrated in urban areas and the private sector.

 

The physical reach of any health care facility is a challenge in rural areas, particularly for patients with chronic ailments. Patients in rural areas must travel more than five km to access an in-patient facility 63 percent of the time, the study found.

 

Patients in rural areas face difficulty in accessing transportation options and loss of earning as a result of travel time to reach facilities for treatment, it says.

 

Private health care facilities are being used by an increasing proportion of patients due to gaps in quality and availability of public facilities.

Availability of doctors is a key reason for selecting private facility outpatient treatment.

 

The study goes on to say that the cost of treatment at private health care facilities is between two and nine times higher than at public facilities, thus leading to debt burden on the poor.


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The mHealth Case in India

The mHealth Case in India | ICT based doctor-patient communication | Scoop.it
The mHealth Case in India

This paper presents the opportunities for mHealth adoption in rural and urban markets, and explores the role that telcos can play in the delivery of mHealth services in India. 




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Patient information to go online in government hospitals

Patient information to go online in government hospitals | ICT based doctor-patient communication | Scoop.it

Soon, patients of Coimbatore Medical College and Hospital will not have to run from pillar to post with their entire case files to get treated. They can be paper-free when they come in for check-ups as all patient details would be available online.

A hospital management information system would be implemented at GH within a month or so, according to hospital sources.

On the first hospital visit, every patient would be registered in the system with name, photograph and basic health details.


Information recorded for each patient would include his ailment and treatment received. Subsequently, all patient details, including scans, tests and results would be updated into the database.

"The software would allow even scan copies to be uploaded and added to a patient's database, so it would be easy for the consultant to access all the data with the click of a mouse instead of poring over through different reports in a file," said a doctor.

When a patient gets registered, he will be given an identity card with an identification number. Whenever he visits any department in the hospital, he just has to show his card and number.

They would immediately access all his details.

"This is extremely helpful in the pharmacy, labs and scan centres, where sometimes patients do not know how to ask for the right test or scan and if the prescription written is illegible," said another doctor.

The hospital is likely to get around 180 computers for the system. Since GH is always congested with patients and doctors may not have time to key-in updates and details, especially during outpatient hours, they are planning to ask house surgeons and PG surgeons to help for this purpose.


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nrip's curator insight, July 15, 2014 1:15 PM

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Docs use WhatsApp to save heart patients

Docs use WhatsApp to save heart patients | ICT based doctor-patient communication | Scoop.it

Doctors at KEM Hospital have turned to the most ubiquitous personal technology - the smartphone - to speed up diagnosis of patients with suspected heart complications. 

They have started using the popular smartphone messenger 'WhatsApp' to send pictures of patients' electrocardiograms (ECG) to each other for a quick review, saving time spent on reaching the emergency ward and checking the actual report. 

The approach enables them to begin the treatment of a person who has suffered a heart attack within the crucial golden hour, the period when emergency care is most likely to be successful. Delay in proper diagnosis and treatment during this period results in amajority of cardiac fatalities. 

In fact, over 60 per cent of patients who have suffered a heart attack reach the hospital way beyond the golden hour, the average being about five hours. So every moment they spend waiting for the doctor to arrive and study their ECG increases the risks. 

"The moment a patient walks in here complaining of chest pain or any other related problem, a specialist takes out an ECG and sends the image to the doctors on hand," said Dr Prafulla Kerkar, head of KEM's cardiology department. "We, in fact, have a WhatsApp group where the experts in our department are signed in." 


more at http://www.mumbaimirror.com/mumbai/others/Docs-use-WhatsApp-to-save-heart-patients/articleshow/27252815.cms


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eHealth: So near yet so far in India

eHealth: So near yet so far in India | ICT based doctor-patient communication | Scoop.it
India has emerged as the leader in telemedicine with 400 plus telemedicine centres operating across the country which extend clinical healthcare to remote areas. But less than 50% of these facilities are active now. Irregular or no power supply, paucity of technicians to maintain and train the users, inadequate computers and internet bandwidth are few of the issues which plague telemedicine. These observations were made by the experts at the international conference on 'Transforming Healthcare with IT' organised by Apollo Hospitals along with other organisations which started in the city on Friday.

 

Around 500 delegates from various parts of the globe including the US, Canada, UK, Middle East, Belgium, Denmark, Japan, New Zealand, Malaysia and Iran are participating in the conference. Participants discussed e-health initiatives, globalisation of healthcare, challenges of emerging healthcare markets and next generation ICT and healthcare among other issues. The conference will be followed by the 2nd International Congress on Patient Safety to highlight how information and communication technology can make a difference in ensuring the safety of patients on Saturday.


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Emerging trends in healthcare

Emerging trends in healthcare | ICT based doctor-patient communication | Scoop.it

The healthcare sector in India is currently at a cusp – while, the industry is poised to grow at an estimated annual rate of 19 per cent to reach $280 billion by 2020 with India being recognised as a destination for world class healthcare, it is also facing an unprecedented pressure due to the poor reach of quality healthcare to millions of India’s citizens caused by issues of access and affordability. However, adversity is often also an opportunity.

 

This predicament has caught the imagination of committed individuals and institutions in both the private sector as well as the government to look for solutions which ensure that the benefits of world class capabilities reach more than just the top 10 per cent of the population. The government is tackling this issue through several policies and tactical initiatives including increasing its budgetary spend on healthcare from the current around one per cent of GDP, designing and implementing models of healthcare financing including social insurance (like the Rashtriya Swasthya BimaYojna), and partnering with the private sector to best leverage its strengths to achieve its objective of ‘health for all’.

 

In parallel, an ecosystem of innovations for world-class healthcare delivery, driven by private providers, is developing. India is establishing new global standards for cost, quality and delivery, through its breakthrough innovations in healthcare. The last couple of years have seen a rapid increase of private equity and venture capital funds available for entrepreneurs in healthcare, which has enabled scale-up of some new interesting models for providing healthcare.

 
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India’s Vast Mobile User Base Makes it an Ideal Market for mHealth Services

India’s Vast Mobile User Base Makes it an Ideal Market for mHealth Services | ICT based doctor-patient communication | Scoop.it

Changing disease profiles, increased adoption of smart phones, advancements in mobile technology, and greater focus on health and wellness are laying concrete foundation for mHealth in India. Currently, there are more than 20 initiatives for mHealth in the country. This number is set to grow as India has a robust mobile technology infrastructure in place and saw the launch of 4G in 2012. 

Furthermore, India has the second largest population in the world and one of the highest numbers of mobile users. The swelling subscriber base is attributed to low tariffs and inexpensive handsets. 

New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.healthcareIT.frost.com), Overview of mHealth Market in India, finds that the compound annual growth rates (CAGR) for mobile handset in the rural and urban markets are likely to be 12.4 and 10.6 percent, respectively, till 2016. 

mHealth is still a fledgling concept and most of the initiatives undertaken are only a couple of years old. The market has very few successful business models and it will be at least two to five years before a successful model emerges. This is due to the large disparity in mobile infrastructure in rural and urban India. 

“Mobile connectivity and data transmission is still a challenge in the rural markets,” observed the Frost & Sullivan Analyst. “Since people from these market segments use mobile phones mostly for their voice services, the acceptance of value-added services is very low. The primary reason for this is high prevalence of poverty and illiteracy (around 31 percent) in rural areas.” 

The urban market, however, continues to witness growth in mobile handset uptake due to the developing replacement market. With quality healthcare being centralized in urban centers, there is a dearth of medical workforce in rural markets. The healthcare industry is hoping that mobile platforms will close the disparity in service provision. With the increasing penetration of mobile services in rural areas, mHealth solutions can strengthen the healthcare delivery system for the rural population. This will happen only with a collaborative effort on the part of policy makers, telecom providers, and mHealth solution providers. 

“The rural population should be educated about the benefits of mHealth services, while the urban population should be encouraged to use mHealth applications to modify and monitor their lifestyle,” said the analyst. “Once these objectives are realized, the mHealth application market in India is expected to develop significantly over the period of next five years.” 


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Mobile-based healthcare services have huge scope in India: veteran venture capitalist Vinod Khosla

Mobile-based healthcare services have huge scope in India: veteran venture capitalist Vinod Khosla | ICT based doctor-patient communication | Scoop.it

Entrepreneurs working in mobile-based healthcare services have huge opportunities in India, according to Silicon Valley-based veteran VC investor Vinod Khosla.Speaking at Khosla Labs IGNITE 2013, the venture capitalist said the startup ecosystem in India is up for a huge growth, and five years down the line, the country will start seeing many growth stories.


“I am amazed by the activities happening in the mobile space in India. It is growing fast and has a huge potential. With the mobile-based healthcare services, we can slash the cost of healthcare by 90 per cent while at the same proving better quality services,” he said.


Khosla noted that internet is another vertical that is creating a revolution in the country. According to him, startups operating in traditional IT-related areas such as machine learning and data mining can also script success stories in the country.


“Almost all innovations will come only from the startup world. There is a tremendous scope for entrepreneurship in India. As Walmart changed the retail sector and YouTube changed the media space, new startups can revolutionise many verticals,” he said. “The world is ripe for innovation. If you have skills, expertise and idea, do start now,” he urged the people gathered at the event.


Asked about Khosla Ventures’ investment strategy, the veteran investor said it is looking for three things: the team, market and willingness to take risk. “I am looking to invest in companies which can create an impact in the society. The RoI is secondary for us. We have made at least 100 investments, but have never calculated the rate of return.”


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India launches cloud-based Telehealth solution

India launches cloud-based Telehealth solution | ICT based doctor-patient communication | Scoop.it

The Medical Informatics Group of the Centre for Development of Advanced Computing(CDAC) in Pune, India has launched the Mercury Nimbus Suite which allows health care organisations to roll out tele-medicine services using public and private cloud.

The Mercury Nimbus Suite is based on the concepts and technologies developed in a project earlier funded by Department of Electronics & Information Technology (DeitY), Ministry of Communications and Information Technology (MCIT), Government of India.


It has been designed to help doctor and health care specialists make healthcare more inclusive to people in far flung areas. With the new tool in place, patients no longer have to travel long distances for medical attention.


Apart from making health more inclusive, the tool also gives hospitals and healthcare providers the freedom from investing in procuring and maintaining expensiveIT infrastructure. According to CDAC, The flexible pricing models of cloud system coupled with ease of use and feature richness of Mercury™ Nimbus Suite provide an unbeatable tool in the hands of healthcare providers.


“This suite will revolutionize the healthcare delivery mechanism in the nation, while keeping cost of owning and using under control of the users,” the agency said in an official statement.


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The rise of internet use and telehealth in India

The rise of internet use and telehealth in India | ICT based doctor-patient communication | Scoop.it

“Making geography history,” “making distance meaningless,” “a hospital in your pocket,” “cost effective, need based healthcare for everyone, anytime, anywhere,” are all hyperbole—fertile imagination working overtime and hype. But is it possible that in my lifetime I may actually see this happen? Improbable, yes. Impossible, no.


According to the Internet and Mobile Association of India, by June 2014 243 million people in India will have internet access, with 75 million of those living in rural India. India will be second only to China in terms internet use. 130 million people in India now access the internet via smart phones. 50% of urban internet users access the internet daily. So is healthcare via a phone possible in an “emerging economy?” Can this be the equivalent of buying a pizza or booking a ticket online?



Encounters between doctors and patients have always been face to face. I had serious concerns about whether India was ready to receive healthcare via a phone. From October 2012 to April 2013, 1866 individuals from five states were interviewed, 31% from rural areas. 22% from rural areas had smart phones (46% in urban). Surprisingly 48% in rural India and 72% in urban areas had heard of mobile health (mHealth). I would love to do a similar study in the UK or the US.


Perhaps it will clearly show that we are no longer following the West, not even piggy backing, but just leap frogging. In 2011, when I carried out a smaller study at a world renowned temple of technology in Chennai, the awareness of mHealth was dismally low.


The most reassuring finding now was that 55% of respondents (urban and rural) showed a very strong intent to use mobile phones for healthcare, if available. Mobile network operators in India should wake up to this. Their role in this will be much more than offering mobile TV—Tendulkar not withstanding.



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Kenzie and Courtney's curator insight, October 29, 2014 4:21 PM

Social- 

This article shows how India is developing by using a more modern type of communicating. By having over 243 million people introduced to the internet by this year. They're becoming more social within themselves and with the world around them because they're now opened up to the world of technology.

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Gems that fall from Space: Pallasite peridot, faceted moldavite, wire-wrapped tektite, and others

Gems that fall from Space: Pallasite peridot, faceted moldavite, wire-wrapped tektite, and others | ICT based doctor-patient communication | Scoop.it

Several different extraterrestrial materials can be used as gems. Pallasite peridot, faceted moldavite, wire-wrapped tektite, desert glass pendants, iron meteorites.

 

Rocks that fall from the sky have frightened and fascinated people throughout history. They immediately generate curiosity and have a scientific significance. They are made of extremely rare materials that interest scientists, collectors, and curious people alike.

Many meteorites and impactites are small enough and attractive enough to be used as gems in the same condition in which they fell from the sky. Iron meteorites are alloys of iron and nickel that can be cut and polished into beautiful gems or fashioned into the metal parts of jewelry. Pallasites are stony-iron meteorites that contain colorful peridot (olivine) crystals that can be cut into gems. Impactites are often colorful glasses that can be faceted, cut into cabochons, or carved into small sculptures.


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