Conservation in America - Adapt or Die
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Conservation in America - Adapt or Die
Hunters, shooters and fishermen generated $10 billion for Conservation through self-imposed taxes over the past 75 years. State Fish and Wildlife Agencies have combined these funds with hunting and fishing licenses fees to conserve, manage and enhance fish and wildlife and their habitats. But these Agencies, and this successful funding model, face an uncertain future. Hunting and hunters are declining and fewer people hunt or fish than ever before. Falling license revenues mean cuts in critical programs, people and Conservation. For decades, Agencies have put critters 1st and citizens 2nd. They must put people first and adopt to Tools of Business to remain relevant and viable for the next 75 years. Learn more at www.dakota-partners.com
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Breaking Down the Barriers to Sale - Getting More People to Buy Hunting Licenses.

Breaking Down the Barriers to Sale - Getting More People to Buy Hunting Licenses. | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it
Bill Creighton's insight:

 

One of the biggest challenges that State Fish and Wildlife agencies have is talking about money. As a bunch of biologists committed to critters and fishes, it hurts many of them to assign a monetary value to the great work that they do.

 

My good friends at the Missouri Department of Conservation have worked hard with partners like Congressional Sportsmen's Foundation and United Sportsmen's Alliance to knock down barriers to participation. Their Apprentice License program is a great example.

 

Imagine if this article/press release was a bit more direct, maybe something like this:

 

"Conservation is Missouri is funded largely through hunting and fishing license sales.

 

We need these funds to match with excise tax dollars on guns, bows and bullets, funds that topped $600 million last year alone.

 

We use these funds to build shooting ranges, preserve habitat and create places for hunters to hunt and wildlife for all of our citizens to enjoy.

 

Nationally we have seen a 20-year decline in license sales.

 

Over the years we have made our regulations far too complex and we have made it harder to try, buy and use our products.

 

Our Apprentice License program is a great first step to make it easier to buy a license and directly fund Conservation in Missouri.

 

This program is safe and effective. It temporarily removes the barrier of hunter education, allowing a try before you buy approach while keeping hunting safe.

 

Your license dollars are hard at work for you. Find someone that you can take with you under this program and so they can buy a license as well.

 

We all love the outdoors and it costs money to keep it up.

 

Spend the money. Get your friends and family that have never hunted to join you under this program so they can spend the money.

 

It will be worth it, guaranteed.

 

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We Are On The Cutting Edge of the Internet with "E-News!"

We Are On The Cutting Edge of the Internet with "E-News!" | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it

"America is in the throes of a huge demographic shift, and a major factor in this sea change is the Millennial generation, which is forging its own distinct path to adulthood compared with older Americans."

Bill Creighton's insight:

 

Next week at the North America Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference in Denver, an entire afternoon session is dedicated to helping State Fish and Wildlife Agencies better market to Millennials.

 

The recognition that this group holds the key to Conservation's future in America has been two years in the making and it is a welcome event. 

 

This new survey from Pew Research clearly shows that this group of young adults thinks, acts, communicates, interacts with their peers and buys in ways many older folks cannot imagine.

 

One bit of advice for state agency and NGO staff that are working hard to reach this vital demographic. Remember this one fact:

 

The group you are trying desperately to reach has never lived without the Internet. Their entire world is digital to the core.

 

If you want to really connect with them, STOP putting the dreaded letter "e" in front of your marketing and outreach.

 

STOP with the "e-newsletters," "e-blasts," "e-zines," "e-news," "e-tidbits!" 

 

It makes you look really old and out of touch with the very people you want to engage with.

 

 

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Beware Snake Oil Salesmen Selling Golden Data

Beware Snake Oil Salesmen Selling Golden Data | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it

At a unique gathering of data-analytics leaders, new solutions began emerging to vexing privacy, talent, organizational, and frontline-adoption challenges."

Bill Creighton's insight:

 

Beware the Snake Oil Salesmen - those silver-tongued folk who make great promises of corporate fortune mining Customer data.

 

Don't get me wrong - there is enormous wealth in the data that resides within organizations. But getting to it and making good use of it can be like walking in a minefield.

 

Take the Conservation community, including NGOs and State Fish and Wildlife Agencies. These guardians of wildlife and habitat sit on top of some of the most comprehensive Customer data in the country.

 

- Can they even get to it? Not very easily.

 

- Is the data structured and easily understood? Hardly.

 

- Are the various Customer databases even connected? Get real.

 

Imagine that hunters are required to complete Hunter Education as a first step to becoming a paying Customer. Now imagine that your vendors delivering digital learning on your behalf give you wonderfully robust and well-formatted data.

 

These newly minted Hunter Education graduates are now qualified sales leads. Do you think that sales data is then used to market to potential license buyers? 

 

Sadly no. And so it goes...

 

State Fish and Wildlife Agencies are at a crossroads. License sales are falling and they are not replacing dying customers with fresh new ones.

 

The opportunity is clear; the demand is there; the data exists to help make the sale.

 

These agencies will need to give great time, resource and funding to get to the data they will need to stay in business.

 

Snake Oil Salesmen will tell them that it's a walk in the park. Throw more money at the research and not at the solution. That's the way we have always done it.

 

Wrong Answer. Treat the business of Fish and Wildlife like a business and not a research park.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Losing the Messaging War. Facebook Is Caught in Debate on Gun Sales

Losing the Messaging War. Facebook Is Caught in Debate on Gun Sales | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it
Under pressure from law enforcement and advocacy groups, Facebook took steps Wednesday to regulate gun sales on its site as well as on its photo-sharing app Instagram.
Bill Creighton's insight:

 

Conservation groups continue to lose the message wars when it comes to guns and hunting.

 

As opponents to hunting and shooting work the system to press their agendas, Conservationist remain silently on the sideline taking ineffective pot shots at the antis and traditional media.

 

Take a read of this NY Times story.

 

Lot's of quotes from people with a gun control agenda. And an effective quote from Chris Cox of the NRA.

 

But where are the quotes from Conservationists about the incredible economic and cultural benefits from hunting and shooting?

 

Where is the quote that declares that hunting is the 2nd largest employer in America?

 

Where is the quote that tells concerned citizens that the self-imposed excise on guns and bullets has contributed more than $8 billion to Conservation so that they and their families can enjoy the outdoors?

 

People won't know about all of the good things that come from the sales and use of guns and bullets unless someone tells them.

 

It's a sure bet that the NY Times isn't going to go down that road.

 

Opportunity Lost is Opportunity Lost Forever.

 

 

 

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Let's All Build a Mobile App ! Time Spent With Mobile Apps Now Exceeds Desktop Web Access

Let's All Build a Mobile App ! Time Spent With Mobile Apps Now Exceeds Desktop Web Access | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it
Bill Creighton's insight:

 

Charts like this can have two very different effects on Marketers.

 

The first effect is that the good ones tweak their channel marketing strategies to improve their Customers' experiences. They understand that a mobile app is one engagement channel, albeit growing daily in importance.

 

The second effect is drive people to shout "We Need An APP!"

 

There are many members in the Conservation community that fall into this second group. They want desperately to serve their members and Customers better - but often simply don't know how.

 

This chart screams to these good folks that they need to engage their Customers on mobile devices.

 

They would be wise to take time to understand what value they can offer to their Customers through a mobile app. 

 

Tossing the kitchen sink at Customers often has really unpleasant effects. 

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Bill Creighton's curator insight, March 7, 2014 12:03 PM

 

Charts like this can have two very different effects on Marketers.

 

The first effect is that the good ones tweak their channel marketing strategies to improve their Customers' experiences. They understand that a mobile app is one engagement channel, albeit growing daily in importance.

 

The second effect is drive people to shout "We Need An APP!"

 

There are many members in the Conservation community that fall into this second group. They want desperately to serve their members and Customers better - but often simply don't know how.

 

This chart screams to these good folks that they need to engage their Customers on mobile devices.

 

They would be wise to take time to understand what value they can offer to their Customers through a mobile app. 

 

Tossing the kitchen sink at Customers often has really unpleasant effects. 

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Stop With All the Words Already - Use More Pictures to Tell Your Story

Stop With All the Words Already - Use More Pictures to Tell Your Story | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it

"Studies show that blog posts with visuals drive up to 180% more engagement than those without.

 

This means that a visual image can allow people to digest your content, then decide if they want to continue to read the article."

Bill Creighton's insight:

 

Wait for it:

 

About 93% of all communication is nonverbal.

 

Nonverbal. That means Pictures work better than Words.

 

So why is it that so many State Fish and Wildlife agencies  and Conservation groups fail so badly at communicating with their Customers?

 

For one thing, many of the communications and outreach staff are biologists and not professional communicators. They want desperately to do better but just don't know how.

 

More importantly, they tend to be word people who have lived their lives and careers in a world of research and data.

 

I cringe every time I see a great storytelling opportunity missed by a fish and wildlife agency that uses way too many words and lousy pictures.


Words Matter, But Pictures Matter More.

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Bill Creighton's curator insight, March 7, 2014 12:04 PM

 

Wait for it:

 

About 93% of all communication is nonverbal.

 

Nonverbal. That means Pictures work better than Words.

 

So why is it that so many State Fish and Wildlife agencies  and Conservation groups fail so badly at communicating with their Customers?

 

For one thing, many of the communications and outreach staff are biologists and not professional communicators. They want desperately to do better but just don't know how.

 

More importantly, they tend to be word people who have lived their lives and careers in a world of research and data.

 

I cringe every time I see a great storytelling opportunity missed by a fish and wildlife agency that uses way too many words and lousy pictures.

 

Words Matter, But Pictures Matter More.

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The Power Of Predictive Analytics and Conservation in America

The Power Of Predictive Analytics and Conservation in America | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it
Take a look at how some of today's top brands are applying (and benefiting from) predictive analytics.
Bill Creighton's insight:

 

Biologists love data.

 

They love tracking deer and bear and raccoons and tiny little fish. They are experts at using this data to build habitat and wildlife restoration plans.

 

The future of Conservation in America certainly requires solid use of data for these worthy programs.

 

The problem is that the real key to the future of Conservation is money - and the need to increase hunting and fishing license sales.

 

Without license sales, State Fish and Wildlife Agencies are dead in the water and will have no money to grow more deer and study more fish.

 

Netflix, Amazon and Zappos are experts in using data to provide better Customer Experiences. They get it. And they are rewarded with more Customers spending more money.

 

State Agencies need more people spending more money on hunting and fishing licenses. 

 

They have the data. They need to use the data to drive Sales and Customer Loyalty before it's too late.

 

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Slaughtering Elephants and the Benefits of Hunting as Wildlife Conservation

Slaughtering Elephants and the Benefits of Hunting as Wildlife Conservation | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it
Bill Creighton's insight:

 

Talk about a missed opportunity to tell a great story.

 

Where are the voices of those that kill animals for Conservation?

 

Here you have the epitome of wildlife destruction, a person bragging about slaughtering animals. You have a powerful image, a compelling headline, a multi-billion dollar tie in to greed, and a headshot of the villan.

 

Conservation and Wildlife Restoration in America is delivered by State Fish and Wildlife Agencies in partnership with the US Fish and Wildlife Service

 

More importantly, it has been paid for primarily by hunters.

 

Yep -- guys buying guns and bullets and hunting licenses pay a self-imposed tax and that money flows back to state agencies. Millions of acres have been conserved and millions of endangered animals have reversed their critical decline.


It's the greatest Conservation story never told.

 

So what should these agencies do when a gift like this poacher is handed to them?

 

Sadly, they should have done more than they have done with this story, and all of the other anti-hunting stories that have surfaced over the past year.

 

Rather than remaining silent and fearing a public backlash and tough conversations, these guardians of wildlife should shout out as far and wide as as possible.

 

To quote my friends at the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

 

"Hunting is Conservation"

 

State agencies, hunters and Conervationists around the country should learn to use gifts like this to tell the right Conservation story.

 

Opportunities like thiscome along that often.

 

 

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Coca-Cola's Secret to Storytelling - Make the Ordinary Interesting.

Coca-Cola's Secret to Storytelling - Make the Ordinary Interesting. | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it
Coca-Cola applies the “water cooler test” to determine whether blog, photo and video content is compelling.
Bill Creighton's insight:

Coca-Cola revamped thgeir website last year to create a a visually-drive engagement platform. 

 

In many ways their digital presense was like those of State Fish and Wildlife Agencies - built in 1995 well before Social and well before more flexible technologies and Mobile.

 

Coke has a small team of 7 people that maintain the "Journey" website and operate the site as any traditional publisher would - using editorial calendars to keep the site predictably fresh, while allowing for spontaneous stories to surface to the front.

 

Hunters, shooters and fishermen are on a lifetime journey. Agencies struggle to move license buyers from transactions to lifetime relationships.

 

This presentation, and Coke's new site, are good starting points for Agency staff to consider as they revamp their Customer relationships.

 

 

 

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Make It Personal | The Secret To A Better Customer Experience

Make It Personal | The Secret To A Better Customer Experience | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it

OK, so check this out: If you go to the Yahoo Fantasy Sports page you should see the page is sponsored by my company, SAP. 

 

But when you click the banner or logo, you aren’t blindly taken to our corporate website or an expensive “landing page.”


You are taken to the homepage of our Business Innovation blog site.

Bill Creighton's insight:

 

The world holds up Amazon as the model for personalization and customized transactions. 

 

But they are not alone in the use of technology to create more personal, relevant and timely conditions that lead toward higher engagement and sales.

 

Yahoo Fantasy Sports is a great example; Google is not too shabby either.

 

But what about State Fish and Wildlife Agencies?

 

After all their Customers must provide significant information like DOB, height, weight, eye color, mailing address and SS#. 

 

Although many states still issue paper hunging and fishing licenses, most are migrating toward digital sales and have stored (somewhere) all past transactions.

 

Do they offer personailzed transactions that are tied to past purchases. Nope, not a one.

 

As one State Agency leader told me recently, the group that sells the licenses is only concerned about recording the transaction. This group no responsibility to share that data and is allowed to make IT decisions without considering the Customer Experience.

 

Can you imagine Jeff Bezos allowing that to happen?

 

Maybe that's why Amazon remains the gold standard and state agencies are still wondering why their Customers are abandoning them.

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"Adult Onset Hunters" | The Problem When Biologists Try to Act Like Marketers

"Adult Onset Hunters" | The Problem When Biologists Try to Act Like Marketers | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it

Via Bill Creighton
Bill Creighton's insight:

 

I do a great deal of work with a wonderful group of dedicated folks, mostly passionate biologists and wildlife professionals. They have spent their lives focused on critters.

 

Not only do they practice Conservation and protect wildlife, they also provide services to ... ready for it ... people.

 

The problem is that they see these citizens through a wildlife prism. In a well-meaning effort to understand and group their bosses (voters) they use the only framework they know best.

 

One group they are now focused on selling to is the coveted 18-34 year-old demographic. This group is under-represented in the hunting population and one of the fastest growing groups to take up shooting sports.

 

There are lots of ways to describe this group, "millenials" and "Gen Y" come to mind and they are not too bad or remotely offensive.

 

Unfortunately, they are being lumped into a group called "Adult Onset Hunters."

 

A quick Bing search for "Adult Onset" shows results in the accompanying diseases and maladies that no one would wish for.

 

Perhaps my friends would have more success thinking about the people in this group as individuals, like their their friends and neighbors. 

 

I'm not sure I would want to join a group that labels me "Adult Onset" anything.

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Bill Creighton's curator insight, February 5, 2014 4:43 PM

 

I do a great deal of work with a wonderful group of dedicated folks, mostly passionate biologists and wildlife professionals. They have spent their lives focused on critters.

 

Not only do they practice Conservation and protect wildlife, they also provide services to ... ready for it ... people.

 

The problem is that they see these citizens through a wildlife prism. In a well-meaning effort to understand and group their bosses (voters) they use the only framework they know best.

 

One group they are now focused on selling to is the coveted 18-34 year-old demographic. This group is under-represented in the hunting population and one of the fastest growing groups to take up shooting sports.

 

There are lots of ways to describe this group, "millenials" and "Gen Y" come to mind and they are not too bad or remotely offensive.

 

Unfortunately, they are being lumped into a group called "Adult Onset Hunters."

 

A quick Bing search for "Adult Onset" shows results in the accompanying diseases and maladies that no one would wish for.

 

Perhaps my friends would have more success thinking about the people in this group as individuals, like their their friends and neighbors. 

 

I'm not sure I would want to join a group that labels me "Adult Onset" anything.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bill Creighton's curator insight, February 6, 2014 8:25 AM

 

I do a great deal of work with a wonderful group of dedicated folks, mostly passionate biologists and wildlife professionals. They have spent their lives focused on critters.

 

Not only do they practice Conservation and protect wildlife, they also provide services to ... ready for it ... people.

 

The problem is that they see these citizens through a wildlife prism. In a well-meaning effort to understand and group their bosses (voters) they use the only framework they know best.

 

One group they are now focused on selling to is the coveted 18-34 year-old demographic. This group is under-represented in the hunting population and one of the fastest growing groups to take up shooting sports.

 

There are lots of ways to describe this group, "millenials" and "Gen Y" come to mind and they are not too bad or remotely offensive.

 

Unfortunately, they are being lumped into a group called "Adult Onset Hunters."

 

A quick Bing search for "Adult Onset" shows results in the accompanying diseases and maladies that no one would wish for.

 

Perhaps my friends would have more success thinking about the people in this group as individuals, like their their friends and neighbors. 

 

I'm not sure I would want to join a group that labels me "Adult Onset" anything.

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Your Customers Hate You Because You Forced Them to Do Dumb Things.

Bill Creighton's insight:

 

Sometimes the most simply advice I can give my clients is to ask themselves the following question:

 

"What would you buy your product if I forced you to do the things you force your Customers to do?"

 

I recently did some work with state fish and wildlife agency staff responsible for Hunter Education.  

 

To be clear, Hunter Education is a concept I fully embrace. It has saved lives and saved heartaches since its inception. Hunter Education continues to play a critical role in ensuring safe hunting.

 

But in too many cases it is a barrier. Not enough courses when Customers want to take them. Information overload. Too much time is required.

 

Funny thing happens when these folks try to get their children, relatives, peers or their elected officials through the courses. Change comes quickly when it hits home..

 

Customers - Walk a mile in their shoes. Careful though, you may not like what you see...

 

 

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Words Matter, Pictures Matter More

Words Matter, Pictures Matter More | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it
Bill Creighton's insight:

 

A room full of writers would look at this image and think about clever ways to describe this, write trolling headlines and adding in stats, charts and graphs to explain it.

 

Consumers will look at it and think hard about driving under the influence ever again.

 

 

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Don't Bore Your Customers to Death. They Are People, Not Critters.

Don't Bore Your Customers to Death. They Are People, Not Critters. | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it
Bill Creighton's insight:

 

Read almost any social media post, or worse yet, a press release from a State Fish and Wildlife agency and the pain sets in almost immediately.

 

Certainly you know what a "CAFO" is, right? How about "PWQ?" Come on, you certainly know what "IASWCD" is.

 

Your Customers are people and they expect for you to converse with them as you would your neighbors and friends. 

 

BTW - CAFO = "Confined Animal Feeding Operation" ... Super important to the folks on the street, right?

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When Pictures of Old White Guys With Guns Won't Sell Your Products Anymore

When Pictures of Old White Guys With Guns Won't Sell Your Products Anymore | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it

"The truth is, it's never as easy as "translating" your marketing communications and website to a new language—the key is to "localize" and better understand the unique qualities of different cultures.

 

You might need to modify your product to agree with local preferences, the way Coca-Cola and Fanta do.

 

In Europe, for example, Fanta has a higher percentage of fruit juice, no high fructose corn syrup, a lighter color, and a taste that's more refreshing than the way too orange and sweet American version."

 

Bill Creighton's insight:

 

Back in the good old days of hunting and fishing, selling the dream was pretty easy.

 

All you needed was an staged, artsy picture of a grandfather bonding with his grandson out in the field to convey the passing of the torch and the enduring legacy of the America's hunting heritage. 

 

Good luck making that that now.

 

Our country no longer looks like it did in the 1950's and the same tired messages that may have worked then don't work today. 

 

Marketers in the Conservation community, including NGOs and State Fish and Wildlife Agencies, need to create imagery and words that resonate with their Customers and reflect their lives and families.

 

Pop quiz:

 

- Do you know how different ethnic groups react to men clad in camo?

 

- How about the reaction some folks have to guns pointed in the air versus pointing toward the ground?

 

 - How about the reaction to all of the pictures of youngsters holding up dead deer heads?

 

Do you really believe that the answer is a simple translation of your wildlife rules and regulations into another language? 

 

If you want to sell to people that don't look like you, you better understand what motivates them to buy your product. 

 

 

 

 

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Millennials To Marketers: Here's How We See The World

Millennials To Marketers: Here's How We See The World | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it

Are millennials part of your market? Here's millennial data to tailor your marketing based on 2014 Nielsen research."

Bill Creighton's insight:

 

Terrific insights from Heidi Cohen on marketing to Millennials!

 

All very useful information and data on how this group thinks, acts, and makes decisions.

 

The Conservation community, including NGOs and State Fish and Wildlife Agencies, has come to the realization that this group stands as their last, best chance to save the 75 year old North American Model of Wildlife Conservation.

 

That's a very good thing.

 

And here's a bit of advice for those guardians of American wildlife and habitat...

 

Take a lot of time to read Heidi's advice and then take more time to read the Nielsen report.

 

Then read it again...

 

And then when you get ready to look at this demographic as you have done over the past 75 years - stop dead in your tracks.

 

- The programs you have been running for the past 75 years will not work with this crowd. 

 

- The way you try to control Customer behavior will not work with this crowd.

 

- Your lack of trust in them will turn them away.

 

The Future of Conservation in America is counting on you to adapt.

 

Adapt or Die ...

 

 

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We Need A Facebook Page!

We Need A Facebook Page! | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it

"Our challenge going forward is to reach consumers wherever they are, on their time. It's less about our supply and more about their demand.

 

This requires research, and it requires a spirit of enterprise and innovation. This necessitates a very different kind of organizational culture.

 

The biggest mistake you could make is to deny this fundamental truth."

Bill Creighton's insight:

 

The Conservation community lives in an analogue world. And it's a pretty special world.

 

Plants, Animals, fish, scenic vistas and wonderful outdoor experiences. There is nothing like the silence of Nature.

 

Unfortunately, for many marketing staff in the Conservation community, their lives have been so focused on analogue experiences that they fail to understand how to communicate digitally with their Customers.

 

At a conference recently, a gentleman was very proud of the work his group was doing to help restore an endangered species. His work is expensive and relies on consistent public support.

 

At the end of the presentation he proudly said "and we have a Facebook page ... not sure why but we have one."

 

Opportunity lost yet again.

 

The very support this program requires will flow from connected online communities that share ideas, passions and advocacy for this group's mission.

 

Sending a boring press release to a newspaper with declining circulation is not going cut it.

 

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Bill Creighton's curator insight, March 7, 2014 12:04 PM

 

The Conservation community lives in an analogue world. And it's a pretty special world.

 

Plants, Animals, fish, scenic vistas and wonderful outdoor experiences. There is nothing like the silence of Nature.

 

Unfortunately, for many marketing staff in the Conservation community, their lives have been so focused on analogue experiences that they fail to understand how to communicate digitally with their Customers.

 

At a conference recently, a gentleman was very proud of the work his group was doing to help restore an endangered species. His work is expensive and relies on consistent public support.

 

At the end of the presentation he proudly said "and we have a Facebook page ... not sure why but we have one."

 

Opportunity lost yet again.

 

The very support this program requires will flow from connected online communities that share ideas, passions and advocacy for this group's mission.

 

Sending a boring press release to a newspaper with declining circulation is not going cut it.

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How Many Customers Did You Turn Away Today?

How Many Customers Did You Turn Away Today? | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it

US Hispanics are known for their heavy digital consumption, and they overindex on daily device usage to shop for local products and services.

 

Over half of Hispanic internet users use tablets every day for local shopping, compared with less than 30% of their non-Hispanic counterparts.

Bill Creighton's insight:

 

Let's paint a picture.

 

A State Fish and Wildlife Agency decides that it would be a good thing to target the "Hispanic" community to encourage them to buy hunting and fishing licenses.

 

(Let's put aside for a moment that within the "Hispanic" community there are dozens of cultural variations.)

 

So they create some marketing collateral in Spanish, maybe make a few banner ads with Spanish text linking to English language pages.

 

Maybe they even go so far as to translate their rules and regulations into Spanish to that this group will really understand the penalties awaiting them when they break those rules.

 

Here's the kicker.

 

All of this points to woefully outdated websites that look horrible on mobile devices.

 

53% of this group use tablets to shop for local products. Hunting and fishing are local products.

 

How many Customers did the agency turn away today? 

 

 

 

 

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Hunting and Fishing License Sales - Aligning Product Price and Platform Promotion

Hunting and Fishing License Sales - Aligning Product Price and Platform Promotion | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it
Recent research has examined the differences between smartphone and tablet shopping behaviors from a variety of different angles, such as how popular shopping activities
Bill Creighton's insight:

 

For State Fish and Wildlife Agencies, this is a very important chart that carries a very important message.

 

Mobile is dominating purchase behavior and will only grow in frequency and importance. For Conservation agencies, this means adopting technologies to facilitate mobile transactions.

 

But what does that really mean for them?

 

First they need to understand that mobile is not a formatting issue but a design imperative. Trying to squeeze a mobile skin on a poorly designed site will just frustrate customers.

 

Beyond that they need to understand who their Customers are what they are buying.

 

Hunting licenses are significantly more expensive for out-of-state residents than for an Agency's citizens. 

 

Using the chart above as one point of reference, it suggest that state residents are more inclined to use a mobile phone to complete a <$25 annual license.

 

Out out state license buyers could pay upwards of $1,000 for permits, tags and license fees. It is a much larger purchase.

 

This chart would suggest that agencies create mobile experiences based on platform, user location, and product selection. 

 

That's Phase 2.

 

Phase 1 has to be an aggressive project to design mobile first experiences for their Customers.

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Hipster Hunters and Conservation's Problem with Labels

Hipster Hunters and Conservation's Problem with Labels | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it
Bill Creighton's insight:

 

I have worked for many years in different parts of the world, in different cultures and many languages.

 

The one thing you learn quickly (and sometimes painfully) is that words mean different things to different people and great care needs to be taken when applying labels to people.

 

So my friends in the Conservation world are really trying hard to find ways to connect with young adults and turn them into lifelong hunters.

 

Hunting license sales and hunting participation have been on a steady decline for the past 20+ years and this is having a dramatic and negative impact on State Fish and Wildlife agencies.

 

Labels.

 

State agencies have labels for young people who are prospective Customers - they call them "youth." It's a awkward word that's pretty impersonal but hey it could be worse.

 

They have labels for old white guys that make up the bulk of the license buying Customer population - they call them "mentors." It's a very presumptous word that implies each and everyone of these guys are fit to teach, lead, coach and nurture "youth." 

 

Then there are the folks in the middle - that uncomfortable group with tats and earloops and clothes that make agency staff cringe.

 

They like to call them "Adult Onset Hunters," which sounds like a disease. They like to call them "Millenials" but not really.

 

The latest term du jour is "Hipster Hunter."  It's as bad as "Adult Onset Hunter."

 

Both can describe people who hunt but are easily twisted to be about hunting people as the right hand image above shows.

 

Not sure that State Fish and Wildlife agencies really want to be promoting the stalking and killing of young adults as a means of Conservation.

 

 

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The Importance of Keeping the End Goal in Sight in Social Media Strategic Planning

The Importance of Keeping the End Goal in Sight in Social Media Strategic Planning | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it
While it’s different for every business, return on investment can be difficult to quantify.

 

You’re often working to develop and generate stronger brand relationships, rather than putting on the hard sell for quick returns.

 

This is still possible through social media.

Bill Creighton's insight:

 

It really does not matter which industry you work in. The main goal, the only goal, that really matters is creating a postive Return on Investment.

 

My friends in the Conservation community might say they are "different" ... that a financial ROI is less important than say, "educating the public on the benefits that accrue..." through Conservation.

 

Education is certainly important. Without knowledge and awareness of your products and services, no one would buy and no income would flow to pay their salaries.

 

Conveying this information to the public is very challenging for state fish and wildlife agencies. 

 

Most often, agency staff want to tell the public what they have done, how many deer they have grown, how the agency staff are really smart when it comes to waters and fields and forests.

 

But what the public wants to know from their (repeat "their") state fish and wildlife agency is pretty simple. What's in this for me? Why sound I care?

 

Which all comes back to ROI. All of the outreach, education, social posts and likes are fairly meaningless. 

 

If the public isn't convinced by all of this that they should buy your product - a hunting or fishing license - then the ROI is Zero.

 

Zero. No business or agency can exists with Zero.

 

 

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How "Personal" Was Your Experience When You Last Bought a Hunting License?

How "Personal" Was Your Experience When You Last Bought a Hunting License? | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it
Buyer Personas are examples of the real buyers who influence or make decisions about the products, services or solutions you market.
Bill Creighton's insight:

 

This is a really great outline listing the benefits of data analytics in helping to segment and target audiences.

 

All of this data points toward a highly personalized effort to connect with the prospect at precisely the right time when they want to buy your product.

 

State Fish and Wildlife Agencies collect much of this incredibly valuable information - the depth of which marketers in the Outdoor Industry would die for.

 

Sadly, most of this information resides in disconnected databases, lacking a coherent data framework and often covered by outdated privacy laws and policies.

 

Customers want personalized experiences that they can share with friends and family. The have those experiences all across the web and they expect the same experience when buying from the State Agency.

 

When was the last time you had a personalized experience when buying a hunting or fishing license?

 

Thought so... Ever wonder what not?

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Mobile First Responsive Design - Meet Your Customers Where They Live.

Mobile First Responsive Design - Meet Your Customers Where They Live. | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it
Mobile first design doesn’t mean starting from scratch. Its a useful process even if you have an existing desktop site. 
Start by asking what would the mobile version of this site or app look like? 
You’ll determine what priorities matter on key screens and flows. By the time you’re done, you’ll be likely to able to make the desktop version better based on what you learned designing for mobile.
Bill Creighton's insight:

 

Virtually all State Fish and Wildlife Agencies face the same overwhelming challenges with their websites.

 

Most were built years ago, on outdated platforms and using restrictive designs and programming languages.

 

Most agency websites are also designed like library catalogues --- "we have a lot of stuff to tell you and we are going to make you spend your valuable time trying to finds what you are looking for."

 

Now compound that problem with the fact that none were designed for engagement on mobile devices. Cluttered pages, too many words, inconsistent links.

 

State Fish and Wildlife Agencies are losing customers at an alarming rate. They search for answers, for the best programs and best practices, but many fail to see the most obvious improvement they can make.

 

Agency websites are the gateway to recruiting new Customers. The new Customers that will save the Agencies'' business live and breath iPhones, iPads and Android devices.

 

With limited dollars to spend on Customer acquisition, why would any business not focus on the top of the funnel and go mobile first?

 

 

 

 

 

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Use Images That Mean Something to Your Readers. Should You Use Stock Or Free Images For Blog Posts?

Use Images That Mean Something to Your Readers. Should You Use Stock Or Free Images For Blog Posts? | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it
You need images for your blog posts, but should you use stock or free images for blog posts? Maybe it's time to consider making your own images.
Bill Creighton's insight:

 

As a recovering journalist and photographer that has worked in 76 countries across the globe, I find this a great question.

 

Here's what I learned that's true for every place I every visitied.

 

All news is local.

 

People will be attracked to images that are a reflection of themselves. They will be attracted to images that inspire them and enrich their lives.

 

Engagement will be higher if your pictures are a reflection of your audience.

 

 

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The Role of Long-Form Content in Brand Journalism

The Role of Long-Form Content in Brand Journalism | Conservation in America - Adapt or Die | Scoop.it
There are six things to consider when creating long-form content...and several ways for you to do so without having to spend all of your time writing.
Bill Creighton's insight:

 

This is just great advice:

 

"Don’t write a lot of words for the sake of doing so."

 

A few more words to drive him the point. If a picture tells the same story, use that instead of lots of words.

 

Words Matter. Pictures Matter More.

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