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British Isis jihadists openly plotting #Londonattack and still Twitter won't stop them

British Isis jihadists openly plotting #Londonattack and still Twitter won't stop them | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
How many more people have to die before Twitter wakes up to the danger of jihadi accounts?
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Review: City Lights' 'Hedda Gabler' a darkly rich production

Review: City Lights' 'Hedda Gabler' a darkly rich production | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
It does not take long to assemble an opinion on Hedda Gabler, the vindictive anti-heroine created by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen in 1890. When we first meet Hedda, she gives a congenial greet...
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Theatre review: Hedda Gabler (Belvoir, Sydney)

Theatre review: Hedda Gabler (Belvoir, Sydney) | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
Attempts to challenge audience perceptions and explore Ibsen's text fall flat as production misses mark.
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Hedda Gabler - Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906)

Read "Hedda Gabler," by Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906).
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An interesting piece on the International character of the play, and the time setting. 1860s, not later. Pre-modernisation. 

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Hedda Gabler, Old Vic, review - Telegraph

Hedda Gabler, Old Vic, review - Telegraph | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
Charles Spencer reviews Henrik Ibsen's Hedda Gabler, starring Sheridan Smith, at the Old Vic.
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REVIEW:

REVIEW: | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
From the first moment she opens up the case of General Gabler's famous pistols, Kate Fry's Hedda seems well aware of her name and how her story ends.
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Hedda Gabler review – gender-bending restaging of Ibsen falls flat

Hedda Gabler review – gender-bending restaging of Ibsen falls flat | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
The decision to cast a male actor in one of stage's most famous female parts fails to pay off, in this Australian reworking of a classic, writes Peter Gotting
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In Conversation: Tony Kushner and John Lahr Talk Tennessee Williams

In Conversation: Tony Kushner and John Lahr Talk Tennessee Williams | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
Tony Kushner talks with John Lahr about his new biography of Tennessee Williams, and what the playwright's declining later years say about his art---and about America.
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Wells of English defiled

Wells of English defiled | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
Write about language, as about climate change or evolution, and what do you get? A strident chorus of denial. I wonder why.

Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, April 3, 2014 2:29 AM

Write about language, as about climate change or evolution, and what do you get? A strident chorus of denial. I wonder why.

Last week Tom Chivers wrote about English grammar at The Telegraph, patiently explaining why a good deal of what has been taught about grammar is unsound and what linguists, Geoffrey Pullum in particular, have discovered in examining how we speak and write. ("Are grammar Nazis ruining the English language?" was an unfortunate headline, overstating the case and using the inflammatory Nazi, but we'll pass on.)

Naturally, the comments filled up with rubbish (probably bollocks would be the preferable British term). "You can't keep changing word meanings on a whim and kowtowing to the ignorant who use words wrong, and then expect that good communication will happen" is typical. And very quickly prejudices about language turn out to be fused with other prejudices, as in the comment resenting attempts "to intimidate those of us who are genuinely British and have lived and worked here all our lives, not just arrived with our hands held out to readily accept benefits and all the other trappings available to those who have not earned it." 

For some, Spenser's "well of English undefiled" is always being polluted. 

Writing later at Language Log, Professor Pullum evaluated the comments thus: "Discussion seemed to be dominated by an army of nutballs who often hadn't read the article. They seemed to want (i) a platform from which to assert some pre-formed opinion about grammar, or (ii) a chance to insult someone who had been the subject of an article, or (iii) an opportunity to publicly beat up another commenter."

As is so often the case, the liberating openness of Internet discussion turns out to resemble an argument about sports terms among people who have had too much to drink as last call nears. 

I've been musing about what lies beneath all the fury. 

Perhaps the simplest explanation is the phenomenon labeled mumpsimus. People are disposed to stick with what they have come to think of as stable knowledge, and the more it is explained to them that they are mistaken, the more they cling to error. 

You saw that in the comical brouhaha over the Associated Press Stylebook's abandonment of the bogus over/more than distinction. Peter Sokolowski, writing at Merriam-Webster.com, summed up the issue with his typical acuity: "A decision like this, from an important style guide, comes as a jolt and a reminder that language conventions change. Even if this particular convention was never grammatically necessary, its consistent use was taken as an indicator of careful professionalism. And that’s what this is really all about: the AP’s announcement affects the profession of editing; it does not alter English grammar. All skilled professions set standards that separate their members from amateurs, and that’s how it should be. The interest over this announcement expresses an anxiety that the need for the specialized skills of good copyeditors is what is being eroded. That is an understandable reaction, but a needless one: clarity of expression is as necessary as it is difficult and rare. We need the professionals. We just don’t need artificial rules that do not promote the goal of clarity."

Writing with clarity and precision does not come easily; it requires years of application. So the anxiety of copy editors over changes in what were thought to be stable rules of usage is perfectly understandable. And it connects to a broader phenomenon of middle-class status anxiety. 

Those of us in the trade know that when we identify ourselves as copy editors, we can expect the response, "I'd better watch my language." That is, "I am afraid that I might betray a level of ignorance that will expose me to ridicule and imperil my precarious grip on the social ladder." What generations of pedagogy* have accomplished is to leave native speakers of English anxious and uncertain about using their own language.



Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/language-blog/bal-wells-of-english-defiled-20140402,0,270177.story#ixzz2xm5O5b77

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Bilingualism: Impact on your Personality?

Bilingualism: Impact on your Personality? | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
Bilingualism: Does Your Personality Change According to the Language You Speak? Studies suggest this is the case.

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 1, 2014 4:15 PM

Many issues are considered.  For example, being able to speak another language is generally linked to a more flexible brain.  This, coupled with cultural influences amongst languages may have an impact. For example, some speakers reported a difference in speaking style.  These differences ranged from level of perceived rudeness to frequency of interrupting another speaker.  Reasons cited for these characteristics included cultural differences in the acceptance of more rude language to the structural differences between the languages spoken.  Word order may have an impact.  If the meaning of the sentence is revealed earlier in one language, interrupting in that language may reduce the risk of misunderstanding the speaker if the significant word or words have already been uttered.

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8 Ways Violent Games Are Bad for Your Kids

8 Ways Violent Games Are Bad for Your Kids | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
The thought of my little boys picking up a gun to shoot someone is not only disgusting, it teaches them to disrespect life. What if that could carry over to their own life or others?...
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Are video games bad for your health?

Are video games bad for your health? | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
Research carried out by Melbourne University found that role-playing video games have become so advanced they are leading people to be 'detached from their bodies.'
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Characterization of Hedda Gabler

Characterization of Hedda Gabler | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
Placed in similar crises as previous Ibsen heroines, Hedda Gabler faces an impasse in her life. Sharing Nora's craving for freedom and Mrs. Alving's compliance
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1960's Hedda Gabler at Quotidian Theatre - DC Theatre Scene

1960's Hedda Gabler at Quotidian Theatre - DC Theatre Scene | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
I was all ready to declare Quotidian Theatre Company’s boldly imagined if awkwardly self-conscious reworking of Hedda Gabler as a fatal misstep in transference. But after revisiting Henrik Ibsen’s original script, I found that director Michael Avolio’s adaptation is in fact an astute, if not penetrating, revamp. I’m now not so sure what to declare …
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Hedda Gabler - Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906)

Read "Hedda Gabler," by Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906).
Alexander Metcalfe's insight:

Some interesting and perceptive points in this introduction. 

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Hedda Gabler

Hedda Gabler | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
In Hedda Gabler, we find some of Ibsen's most memorable prose in a tragic interplay of psycho scape and linguistic drama.
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The Sandra Feinstein-Gamm Theatre

The Sandra Feinstein-Gamm Theatre | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
Alexander Metcalfe's insight:

SCROLL down to the reviews and articles. Some interesting things to consider. 

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Hedda Gabler – review

Hedda Gabler – review | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
Sheridan Smith's admirable performance is affected by the idea of a psychological double-Hedda, writes Michael Billington
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Why A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen is more relevant than ever

Why A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen is more relevant than ever | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
Three major productions in just over a year, one to be revived for the second time next week – why is this play about a Norwegian housewife so enduringly popular? asks Susanna Rustin
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Renault's sexist advert drives me absolutely mad

Renault's sexist advert drives me absolutely mad | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
Elizabeth Day: The car company's efforts to sell its products demean all of us
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Wells of English defiled

Wells of English defiled | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
Write about language, as about climate change or evolution, and what do you get? A strident chorus of denial. I wonder why.

Via Charles Tiayon
more...
Charles Tiayon's curator insight, April 3, 2014 2:29 AM

Write about language, as about climate change or evolution, and what do you get? A strident chorus of denial. I wonder why.

Last week Tom Chivers wrote about English grammar at The Telegraph, patiently explaining why a good deal of what has been taught about grammar is unsound and what linguists, Geoffrey Pullum in particular, have discovered in examining how we speak and write. ("Are grammar Nazis ruining the English language?" was an unfortunate headline, overstating the case and using the inflammatory Nazi, but we'll pass on.)

Naturally, the comments filled up with rubbish (probably bollocks would be the preferable British term). "You can't keep changing word meanings on a whim and kowtowing to the ignorant who use words wrong, and then expect that good communication will happen" is typical. And very quickly prejudices about language turn out to be fused with other prejudices, as in the comment resenting attempts "to intimidate those of us who are genuinely British and have lived and worked here all our lives, not just arrived with our hands held out to readily accept benefits and all the other trappings available to those who have not earned it." 

For some, Spenser's "well of English undefiled" is always being polluted. 

Writing later at Language Log, Professor Pullum evaluated the comments thus: "Discussion seemed to be dominated by an army of nutballs who often hadn't read the article. They seemed to want (i) a platform from which to assert some pre-formed opinion about grammar, or (ii) a chance to insult someone who had been the subject of an article, or (iii) an opportunity to publicly beat up another commenter."

As is so often the case, the liberating openness of Internet discussion turns out to resemble an argument about sports terms among people who have had too much to drink as last call nears. 

I've been musing about what lies beneath all the fury. 

Perhaps the simplest explanation is the phenomenon labeled mumpsimus. People are disposed to stick with what they have come to think of as stable knowledge, and the more it is explained to them that they are mistaken, the more they cling to error. 

You saw that in the comical brouhaha over the Associated Press Stylebook's abandonment of the bogus over/more than distinction. Peter Sokolowski, writing at Merriam-Webster.com, summed up the issue with his typical acuity: "A decision like this, from an important style guide, comes as a jolt and a reminder that language conventions change. Even if this particular convention was never grammatically necessary, its consistent use was taken as an indicator of careful professionalism. And that’s what this is really all about: the AP’s announcement affects the profession of editing; it does not alter English grammar. All skilled professions set standards that separate their members from amateurs, and that’s how it should be. The interest over this announcement expresses an anxiety that the need for the specialized skills of good copyeditors is what is being eroded. That is an understandable reaction, but a needless one: clarity of expression is as necessary as it is difficult and rare. We need the professionals. We just don’t need artificial rules that do not promote the goal of clarity."

Writing with clarity and precision does not come easily; it requires years of application. So the anxiety of copy editors over changes in what were thought to be stable rules of usage is perfectly understandable. And it connects to a broader phenomenon of middle-class status anxiety. 

Those of us in the trade know that when we identify ourselves as copy editors, we can expect the response, "I'd better watch my language." That is, "I am afraid that I might betray a level of ignorance that will expose me to ridicule and imperil my precarious grip on the social ladder." What generations of pedagogy* have accomplished is to leave native speakers of English anxious and uncertain about using their own language.



Read more: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/language-blog/bal-wells-of-english-defiled-20140402,0,270177.story#ixzz2xm5O5b77

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Emotion, autonomy and psychopaths: a cyberpsychologist's take on video games

Emotion, autonomy and psychopaths: a cyberpsychologist's take on video games | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
Cara Ellison: Berni Good discussed the impact of video games on the human psyche
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Are videogames bad for your health?

Are videogames bad for your health? | IB Lang Lit | Scoop.it
The first clinic to treat videogame addiction has opened in the UK. But how dangerous is it to spend hours in front of a console?
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