IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE
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IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE
A range of resources linked to Paper two option F
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Coastal Risk Australia

Coastal Risk Australia | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The Coastal Risk Australia website has been developed to help communicate the risks of coastal flooding associated with sea level rise and storm surge. There is robust evidence that sea levels have risen as a result of climate change based on observations from tide gauges, paleo indicators and satellite measurements. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report found that over the last century global average sea level rose by 1.7 [1.5 to 1.9] mm per year. In recent years (between 1993 and 2010) this rate has increased to 3.2 [2.8 to 3.6] mm per year. The IPCC report finds that the rate of sea level rise over the last century is unusually high in the context of the last 2,000 years.
Australia is a coastal society, 85 per cent of the population lives in the coastal region and it is of high economic, social and environmental value to the nation. Nearly 39,000 residential properties are located within 110 metres of soft, erodible shorelines. Exposure will increase as Australia's population grows.
The impacts of sea level rise will be experienced mainly through its effect on extreme sea level events such as high tides and storm surges. Rising sea levels will increase the frequency or likelihood of extreme sea level events and resultant flooding.
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A really innovative tool to engage students in the impacts of climate change for their local area Australian focused.
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Pros and Cons of Cotton Production in Uzbekistan

Pros and Cons of Cotton Production in Uzbekistan | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"This case study considers the pros and cons of cotton production in Uzbekistan. Since the country's independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, revenues from cotton taxation have contributed substantially to developing the industrial sector, boosting the current account, achieving energy and food-grain self-sufficiency, and buffering domestic shocks in food and energy prices. Nonetheless, some argue that the state procurement system hampers the development of the agricultural sector. Often the payments for cotton hardly cover farmers' production costs, and the quasi mono-culture of cotton production has adversely affected environmental sustainability."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 16, 2:26 PM

Uzbekistan is a top world producer and exporter of cotton. There are many sectors involved in managing the cotton commodity chain to partake in the production. Not only is it a source of income, but provides labor jobs and food consumption. However, the land where the cotton production takes place is suffering. This land faces many types of land degradation that has an impact on the cotton. In order to secure the land, there are possible solutions and policies to improve the agriculture and the cotton benefits. Once the world’s fourth largest lake, the Aral Sea, is located in Uzbekistan, and has had a major impact on the cotton industry. This production has given Uzbekistan a world-wide reputation in cotton production, but is also known for destroying one of the world’s largest lakes.  Just because it is your greatest economic competitive advantage, doesn't mean that it is environmentally sustainable.

 

Questions to Ponder: How much does the cotton production contribute to Uzbekistan economically? What are the solutions to address the demising Aral Sea? Who is impacted the most because of the land issues?

 

Tags:  agriculture, labor, Uzbekistan, physical, weather and climateland use, environmentAral Sea.

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Work starts to build world's largest vertical urban farm in Newark

Work starts to build world's largest vertical urban farm in Newark | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
If all goes to plan, by the end of the year, the site will be on its way to becoming the world’s largest producing vertical farm and growing up to two million pounds of greens and herbs every year.

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India’s Food Security Threatened by Groundwater Depletion

India’s Food Security Threatened by Groundwater Depletion | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The severe and ongoing depletion of underground water supplies in India poses a growing threat to the nation’s food security. Without serious efforts to stem the mining of groundwater, food product...

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USAID | Infographic: The Global State of Agriculture

USAID | Infographic: The Global State of Agriculture | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, February 25, 2015 6:08 AM

CD - The capacity of the world’s environments to sustainably feed the projected future population to achieve food security for Australia and the world.

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Have we reached 'peak food'? Shortages loom as global production rates slow

Have we reached 'peak food'? Shortages loom as global production rates slow | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The world has entered an era of “peak food” production with an array of staples from corn and rice to wheat and chicken slowing in growth – with potentially disastrous consequences for feeding the planet.

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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 2014 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.  

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Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahel, population, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 5:59 PM

with the strife in this region it is hardly surprising that it is hard to maintain food supplies in the face of large scale immigration. in a region where it is hard to survive, immigration would be a massive threat, straining already thinly spread resources.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:22 AM

If a country has a big population growth, the resources that it has if they are already scarce may become devastating. As the population of Sahel does increase, the amount of food resources will not have the proper time to react to the growth. Granted it may take a while for agricultural crops to grow and many citizens may face hard times facing finding food, but their hardships will be overcome by farmers trying to produce more crops to help ease that hardship.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:38 PM

this seems like an alarmingly common problem in the world today with population growth happening at an alarming rate in many parts of the world. most notably india and china. as well as in sahel, if your population grows by 100 million in 10 years it will be impossible to keep up and be able to provide for that many people in such a reletively short time.

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Feeding the Whole World

"Louise Fresco argues that a smart approach to large-scale, industrial farming and food production will feed our planet's incoming population of nine billion. Only foods like (the scorned) supermarket white bread, she says, will nourish on a global scale."


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dilaycock's curator insight, October 19, 2014 6:45 PM

Fresco argues that we tend to see "home-made" agriculture as a thing of beauty, whereas the reality is that many small scale farmers struggle and live a subsistence lifestyle. The adoration of small-scale farming, notes Fresco, is a luxury to those who can afford it. Large-scale production has increased the availability and affordability of food. Food production should be given as high a priority as climate change and sustainability, and we should seriously consider ways in which land can be used as a multi-purpose space that includes agriculture.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 24, 2014 10:55 AM

Louise Fresco speaks of local food production and small scale control

and the entire food nework

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:43 PM

Many advocates of local foods favor a small-scale approach to farming and are opposed to large-scale agribusiness. It might be easy for those disconnected from the food production system (like me) to romanticize and mythologize the farmers of yesteryear and yearn to return to this past.  This talk highlights how essential large-scale farming is absolutely critical to feeding the global population; this other TED talk discusses many of the hunger problems especially the uneven access to food.  Here are some other pro-agribusiness resources.   

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, agribusiness, TED

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Why Agricultural Systems Thinking?

Why Agricultural Systems Thinking? | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
I'm gearing up to teach my favorite class again this fall at UMass, Agricultural Systems Thinking, in which we learn how to think about the many problems create

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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."


Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 2014 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.  

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Let’s Talk About Geography and Ebola

Let’s Talk About Geography and Ebola | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Why knowing where countries are in Africa matters for how the rest of the world thinks about Ebola.

 

Cultural and media norms that often refer to Africa as one entity rather than an 11.7 million-square-mile land mass comprised of 54 countries and over 1.1 billion people who speak over 2,000 different languages.  This cultural confusion means that, when a dangerous virus like Ebola breaks out, Americans who are used to referring to “Africa” as one entity may make mistakes in understanding just how big of a threat Ebola actually is, who might have been exposed to it, and what the likelihood of an individual contracting it might be.  This Ebola outbreak is wreaking havoc on African economies beyond the three most heavily affected by Ebola, and that damage is completely avoidable. The East and Southern African safari industry provides a good example. Bookings for safaris there — including for the famed Great Migration in Kenya and Tanzania — have plummeted due to the Ebola outbreak. These actions are based in fear, not reality.

 

Tags: Ebola, medical, diffusion, Africa, regions, perspective.


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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 18, 2015 9:36 PM

It doesn't surprise me that the average person doesn't know his geography.  It shocks the hell out of me that a college would put themselves in a situation to look that stupid!  Do your research people.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 2015 5:08 PM

This is another example of stereotyping taking its course through Africa.  Even though I am aware of the size and diversity of Africa, I was guilty of associating Ebola with the whole continent and not just the affected areas.  Same thing goes with the AIDS virus and other things, such as poverty.  Articles are great for people in other parts of the world to read to better educate them on the size and diversity of Africa and that there are many different ways of life in its 54 countries.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:44 AM

The Ebola epidemic over the last year put everyone in the world on high alert, not just those who lived in Sierra Leone and many countries in West Africa. It is important to understand how the virus spread so quickly and the advancements made to treat the virus. Geography played a big part of the spread of the virus. Because Africa, and the countries are far from modern medical technology, many non-profit organizations like Doctors without Borders were dispatched to those affected areas to help show and train physicians there the proper techniques on how to treat infected people with Ebola. That's why on the map one can see a far range of countries who treated infected people in facilities that were built to handle cases of Ebola.

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Why we should eat BUGS instead of beef

Why we should eat BUGS instead of beef | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Researchers at the American Chemical Society have spent months examining the nutritional benefits of insects. They found grasshoppers and crickets are a far better source of iron than beef.
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Presentation "Life on the margins: the inequality of food and nutrition security AGRI-FOOD BUSINESS PowerPoint presentation by Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without."

Presentation "Life on the margins: the inequality of food and nutrition security AGRI-FOOD BUSINESS PowerPoint presentation by Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without." | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Life on the margins: the inequality of food and nutrition security AGRI-FOOD BUSINESS PowerPoint presentation by Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without.
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INFOGRAPHIC: How food waste has become a huge global problem

INFOGRAPHIC: How food waste has become a huge global problem | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

Every year, an estimated 1.2 to 2 billion tons of food is wasted—a massive amount of food that, if saved, would be more enough to feed the world’s hungry. Food waste isn’t just a humanitarian issue however; the problem is also a waste of land, water, energy and money. To put food wastage in perspective, Arbtech created an infographic that points out some of the world’s worst offenders and explains how food loss occurs throughout the supply chain. Click through to learn more about food waste and, most importantly, what you can do to help.

 


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Suzette Jackson's curator insight, May 24, 2015 2:02 AM

Food waste isn’t just a humanitarian issue however; the problem is also a waste of land, water, energy and money.

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Teaching the Geography of Food

Teaching the Geography of Food | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"Food. It’s something we all think about, talk about, and need. Food has been one major topic of interest at National Geographic because it connects all of us to our environment. The recent global population projections for the year 2100 just went up from 9 billion to 11 billion, making the issues of food production and distribution all the more important.  For the last 3 years I’ve stored podcasts, articles, videos, and other resources on my personal site on a wide range of geographic issues, including food resources.  I thought that sharing 10 of my personal favorite resources on the geography of food would be helpful to understand our changing global food systems."


Via Seth Dixon
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A great collection of a range of resources to teach the geography of food in all its dimensions.

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Claire Law's curator insight, April 26, 2015 2:01 AM

Ten engaging resources on the geography of food

Kaiden-Leigh Cloete's curator insight, April 29, 2015 11:15 PM

This topic connects to our agricultural unit. This article describes the explaining of food. Knowing where our food comes from is a big component in lit today, with all the GMO's going around we don't know what we r busy consuming daily. Having more information in our minds about food would help decrease the long term affects of genetically modified organisms, help maintain a healthy economy, provide more resources such as water, because if GMO's do come to an end then the water will not be as polluted as it is now due to the runoff from the remaining chemicals in GMO's, and also provide a healthy environment for everyone. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 2:10 AM

I absolutely love this article. It touches on many of the most important and challenging issues facing food production in the world, ranging from food manufacturing ethics to global hunger. I think it's interesting how, although we all eat food everyday, we don't think about the many implications associated with the production and consumption of food. To more privileged people, food is not a big deal, as anyone can get food at any time of day. However, for people who are trying to solve the problems associated with food in the modern world or for people who are suffering from hunger and malnutrition, the information presented in this article is extremely important. Brilliant minds can come together to propose potential solutions for all the problems facing food distribution. I can't wait for the day every child can go to bed with a full stomach, and I am willing to do my part to help make that happen.

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6 Amazing Global Agriculture Maps - Farming Visualized - GIS Geography

6 Amazing Global Agriculture Maps - Farming Visualized - GIS Geography | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Ever wonder where your food comes from? Feast your eyes on these amazing agriculture maps and learn what the future of agriculture holds.

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, February 18, 2015 12:50 AM

CD - The challenges to food production, including land and water degradation, shortage of fresh water, competing land uses, and climatechange, for Australia and other areas of the world

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The world's countries ranked in order of obesity

The world's countries ranked in order of obesity | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
A recent study showed that 700m people across the world are obese. These maps show obesity levels around the world - with red showing countries with the highest proportion of people classified as obese and green having the lowest proportion.

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40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities

40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Just how much of the world's cropland can we really call urban? That's been a big mystery until now.

 

Now, a study published in the journal Environmental Research Letters has an answer: Somewhere around 1.1 billion acres is being cultivated for food in or within about 12 miles (20 kilometers) of cities. Most of that land is on the periphery of cities, but 16.6 percent of these urban farms are in open spaces within the municipal core.


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Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 20, 2015 2:42 PM

This is a perfect application of how Von Thunen model still applies today. Von Thunen mapped how crops were distributed around cites. The crops near the city were labor intensive while the crops farther away from the city were labor extensive. Von Thunen's model is often disputed today in a world with such fast transportation, but this study shows that it still applies today. Unit 5 Agriculture

Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:34 PM

This research explores the concept of urban agriculture and the water supply needed and used. It came up with surprising results that state that 80% of urban agriculture is in the developing world and 40% of urban agriculture is in or near cities.  

 

The research also covered water supply, stating that most of urban agriculture relies on irrigation. This is especially true in South Asia, and since the water resources are already scarce, the farmers have to compete for water with the government.

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, March 22, 2015 7:55 PM

Summary: This article is mostly about how much of our agriculture is grown within 20 miles of a city. It turns out 40% of agriculture is grown in this proximity of a city, and this mostly occurs with irrigated agriculture in South Asia. Most of these urban farms are in the developing world as well. 

 

Insight: This article relates to the von Thunen model because it directly talks about the rings that occur around a city, although it is a skewed version of it. I think this is also a good example of how cities have changed since the developing of the von Thunen model, showing that developed countries are supporting the idea of urban agriculture. 

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Climate change and food insecurity multiplying risks in 32 countries

Climate change and food insecurity multiplying risks in 32 countries | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Climate change and food insecurity are amplifying the risks of conflict and civil unrest in 32 countries, including the emerging markets of Bangladesh, Ethiopia, India, Nigeria and the Philippines, according to the seventh annual Climate Change and Environmental Risk Atlas (CCERA) released by global risk analytics company Maplecroft.

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Other factors impacting the availability of food...

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Waging War Against Global Food Waste

Waging War Against Global Food Waste | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
National Geographic Emerging Explorer Tristram Stuart wants the world to stop throwing away so much good food.

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Deborah Jones's curator insight, October 25, 2014 9:58 AM

PSA

Rebecca McClure's curator insight, November 15, 2014 11:13 PM

Year 9: Food Security

Alex Lewis's curator insight, November 21, 2014 12:18 PM

I think this is a great idea, and the more we reduce our food waste, the better. We can use this food to feed the starving, which would solve two problems at once. Also, the idea of feeding the excess food to the pigs is a good idea. Not as good as conserving the food to give to the needy though. 

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7 charts that explain America's obesity problem

7 charts that explain America's obesity problem | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
New data from the CDC show alarming trends in adult obesity — and a shred of good news.

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Aneolia - abiss® instruments's curator insight, September 8, 2014 1:13 PM

interesting data about obesity in the USA

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Rethinking Agriculture

"Growing Power is a national nonprofit organization and land trust supporting people from diverse backgrounds, and the environments in which they live, by helping to provide equal access to healthy, high-quality, safe and affordable food for people in all communities. See other videos on this organization here."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 5, 2014 10:55 AM

There has been a revitalization in urban gardening as many city dwellers feel disconnected from their food systems; urban gardening is a way for people to actively control what they are ingesting into their systems many fear some of the modern agricultural methods.  Based in Milwaukee, WI, Growing Power has created an interesting combination of vegetable gardening and aquaponics for the urban environment. 


Tags: food, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture.

Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, October 7, 2014 10:48 AM

With the strong waves of urbanization that the United States has seen in the last 100 years it's interesting to note this desire to return to a rural connection while still maintaining the connection to the city. I can see this causing problems with zoning commissions in the future if too many people start trying to become urban famers. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:43 PM

There has been a revitalization in urban gardening as many city dwellers feel disconnected from their food systems; urban gardening is a way for people to actively control what they are ingesting into their systems many fear some of the modern agricultural methods.  Based in Milwaukee, WI, Growing Power has created an interesting combination of vegetable gardening and aquaponics for the urban environment. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture.

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How Ebola sped out of control

How Ebola sped out of control | IB GEOGRAPHY The geography of Food and Health PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The story behind the failure of the world's health organizations to stop the Ebola disaster.

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Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, January 12, 2015 10:18 AM

The development between MDCs and LDCs are very different in a lot of ways. The Ebola epidemic is handled in two different ways because of the levels of development in countries. in MDCs there is more of a health indutry and can cure sicknesses much faster than those countries of less development. 

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:29 PM

It was sad that it took over 4 months for there to be declared an epidemic.  I think if this hit in the US or Europe then things would have been taken care of a lot faster.  Out of sight, out of mind till one trickled in then another.  Then we got scared.  But Africa needs to get it together and create a better continent with healthcare systems that work.  The doctors over there said it looked medieval.  I believe that and can't even fathom how horrible it was.  

Molly McComb's curator insight, May 27, 2015 11:11 AM

Talking about the failure of WHO to stop the Ebola outbreak and how the low developed countries were so quickly affected by the disease.