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Articles related to the IB geography HL extension paper 3.Global interactions
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Cities are the New Nations

Cities are the New Nations | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"Political geography is not determinant anymore, because cities are more important."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 2, 3:37 PM

Controlling borders and territory were the main factors in geopolitics for centuries.  In his book Connectography by Parag Khanna, he argues that connectivity and networks are more important today.  The world's most connected cities act in ways that transcend political boundaries.      

 

Sally Egan's curator insight, June 20, 6:46 PM
A great article providing an new insight into the development and role of World cities.
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These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital

These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Just 15 years ago, cross-border digital flows were almost non-existent. Today, they exert a larger impact on global economic growth than traditional flows of goods, which developed over centuries.

Via Seth Dixon
Alexandra Piggott's insight:

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, March 31, 6:13 AM

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

Trish Harris's curator insight, March 31, 7:40 AM

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

malbert's curator insight, April 4, 4:15 PM

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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6 Amazing Global Agriculture Maps - Farming Visualized - GIS Geography

6 Amazing Global Agriculture Maps - Farming Visualized - GIS Geography | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Ever wonder where your food comes from? Feast your eyes on these amazing agriculture maps and learn what the future of agriculture holds.

Via Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)
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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, February 18, 2015 12:50 AM

CD - The challenges to food production, including land and water degradation, shortage of fresh water, competing land uses, and climatechange, for Australia and other areas of the world

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City of Endangered Languages

"New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world."


Via Seth Dixon
Alexandra Piggott's insight:

Is globalisation enabling the preservation and study of declining languages?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 2014 8:28 PM

This is an excellent video for showing the diffusion of languages in the era of migration to major urban centers.  It also shows the factors that lead to the decline of indigenous languages that are on the fringe of the global economy and the importance of language to cultural traditions.   Here is the article related to the video as well as a BBC article that calls NYC a 'graveyard of languages.'  In a curious twist on the topic of endangered languages, there is a group of Native Americans in Northern California that wouldn't mind seeing their language die out with this generation.  


Tagslanguage, folk cultures, culturediffusionNYC, video.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 7:59 PM

I will be showing this in class DO NOT use it for your scoop it review--

 

unit 3

SRA's curator insight, April 19, 2015 10:30 PM

Victoria Margo



This article really caught my eye because at a young age I was taught to speak spanish and english at the same time, and now that I am older I realize how important it is to know two languages. I will forever be grateful that my parents took the time and made my sisters and I learn something different while growing up.

Languages change over a long period of time and many times languages grow or die within time. Two main vocabulary words that I have not forgotten are Language divergence and Language convergence. Language divergence is the dividing of a language into many new languages. Language convergence is when two languages merge to become one. Both these definitions are extremely important when talking about how some languages will soon be extinct. I believe many languages have been endangered due to families and parents who do not continue speaking their language when they leave their original country/state. Language is very important to our world and society today. As stated from the short video clip, if you do not continue speaking your language then who will? I agree with that completely if you don't practice something over and over again how do you expect to get any better at it? This video was a great way to express the diffusion of languages and how families today still practice their language. This video made me think about and reflect on the video we watched in Geography class a couple weeks back because of the decline of all languages that we may not even be aware of. Many times it is hard to find older people who speak your native language but I also learned from the video we watched in class that it is possible if you are willing to try and continue something that is important to you. There are many different languages that connect to our world. 

I also liked how this article mentioned that New York is the city of immigrants, meaning New York is full of different cultures and unique language. Although this article/video does say that language has been endangered it can definitely be changed with a little knowledge of why this is happening. Geography and language tie in together quite well. I am hoping many languages can be saved for the future. 

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Mapping the World's Migrating Ocean Pollution

Mapping the World's Migrating Ocean Pollution | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
How does Australia's sea trash make it to South America?

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Globalization in a Nutshell

"The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 2014 3:32 PM

This is a good video to explain globalization (although this is my personal favorite), to see that it not just an economic force, but one that touches just about every facet of modern life.
 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?


Tags: globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:24 AM

Globalization in a Nutshell

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 2, 2014 4:29 PM

Integração seletiva...

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Limits to Growth was right. New research shows we're nearing collapse

Limits to Growth was right. New research shows we're nearing collapse | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Graham Turner and Cathy Alexander: Four decades after the book was published, Limit to Growth’s forecasts have been vindicated by new Australian research. Expect the early stages of global collapse to start appearing soon
Alexandra Piggott's insight:

An interesting analysis of this model

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Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Using aerial photographs that render imperiled landscapes almost abstract, Edward Burtynsky explores the consequences of human activity bearing down on the earth’s resources.

Via Seth Dixon
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Is this evidence of homgeniziation of landscapes?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 5, 2014 12:21 PM

This set of over a dozen images highlight the extent that humanity has modified the physical landscape.  These thoughtfully selected images are excellent 'teaching images' with a wide range of classroom applications.


Tags: remote sensing, geospatialenvironment modify, images, perspective.

Diane Johnson's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:12 AM

These images may be very useful for teaching the DCI's under the Human Impact topic.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:11 PM

People change landscapes. This is a great resource available as an iPad App also Called Burtynsky Water. 

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▶ China and the internet - YouTube

Our Live Charts offer food for thought on topics from military spending to millennials to football
Alexandra Piggott's insight:

Controlling Global Interactions

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8 maps that will change the way you look at Africa

8 maps that will change the way you look at Africa | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
You already know that Africa isn t a country. But what else? Check out these maps and put Africa s population, income, growth, potential and more into context.
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'Neo-Andean' architecture sprouts in Bolivia

'Neo-Andean' architecture sprouts in Bolivia | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"Brash, baroque and steeped in native Andean symbols, the mini-mansions are a striking sight on the caked-dirt streets of El Alto, the inexorably expanding sister city of Bolivia's capital."


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Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 12, 2015 2:48 PM

Indigenous peoples across the world are beginning to take pride in their heritage once again, after being told by the forces of the imperialism in their countries, that it was not as good as European culture.  This article shows how in Bolivia, the Aymara people, a native group of the country, are rising to political, economic, and social prominence in the country.  Even the country's leader is from this group.  The architecture of this new rich class reflects native heritage but has elements of globalization.  The "castle" mentioned in the article has indoor soccer pitches (originally a European Sport) but it has so much popularity in South America, that the region is known for it today (look no further than Argentina's Lionel Messi or Brazil's Neymar).  The ballrooms also have European chandeliers, but so strong is the native influenced expressed in the houses, that they take these global factors and make them their own.  I believe this is a beneficial fact, the indigenous people across the world should be proud of their heritage and diverse backgrounds.

 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 22, 2015 11:05 AM

I should not have seen the squatters video first. I know this is a different location but its just amazing economically how you have people, mind you humans who live like the squatters just trying to survive and not because of things they did wrong after all in the other video the gentleman trying to support his family had a job in a state bank but just because they can't catch a break or the way the system is set up. In this video everything is rich and people have no worries about a roof over their head or food in their stomach. I know this happens across the world but just imagine everyone enjoying the same rich benefits and having no economic classes.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 12:43 PM

this is a magnificent example of a new style of architecture sprouting up almost overnight, and a style which is inspired by new ideas. its fantastic to see none traditional architecture becoming big.

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Time and Space, Visualized

Time and Space, Visualized | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:31 AM

The question, "what time is it?" does not have one right answer.  The correct answer is dependent on your location on the Earth and the cultural and political conventions of the society in which live. 

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These 22 Far Away Perspectives Of Famous Places Will Change The Way You See Them Forever

These 22 Far Away Perspectives Of Famous Places Will Change The Way You See Them Forever | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

AmaMany of us only know the world's most famous landmarks through images that show them in all their beautiful, historical glory. The world has changed since these structures were built, so the surrounding landscapes might not be what you'd expect. 


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 23, 2014 8:50 PM

Amazing from a different perspective

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Mapping The Rise Of Mobile Technology For Social Good

Mapping The Rise Of Mobile Technology For Social Good | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
How a mobile device might save the world. Or at least a mom-to-be in Morocco.

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Global Shipping Traffic Visualized

As stated in this NPR article: "The video shows satellite tracking of routes superimposed over Google Earth. It focuses on some of the main choke points for international shipping, such as the Strait of Malacca on the southern tip of Malaysia, Suez Canal, the Strait of Gibraltar and Panama Canal. It's a good reminder that about 90 percent of all the goods traded globally spend at least some of their transit time on a ship."

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, video, visualization.


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Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 26, 2015 4:52 AM

A great visual on shipping - Geographies of Interconnections (year 9)

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:24 PM

An important aspect of global trade links and connections. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:13 AM

Geographic data can be so beautiful...you've got to watch this.  I wish I have seen this when I wrote my National Geographic article on how container ships are transforming the global economy.  

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How your supermarket flowers empty Kenya's rivers

How your supermarket flowers empty Kenya's rivers | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Farms that supply Europe accused of stealing from depleted river.

Via Andy Dorn
Alexandra Piggott's insight:

the impacts of globalising can be as devastating as they can be beneficial

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Big Macs go cold as young Americans drop McDonald’s for tastier rivals

Big Macs go cold as young Americans drop McDonald’s for tastier rivals | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The burger chain is facing problems abroad, but nothing as serious as the year-long decline in its huge home market, writes Jennifer Rankin
Alexandra Piggott's insight:

Could this be the start of a new shift in soci-cultural gloabalisation??

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Deported Mexicans find new life at call centers

Deported Mexicans find new life at call centers | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"Henry Monterroso is a foreigner in his own country. Raised in California from the age of 5, he was deported to Mexico in 2011 and found himself in a land he barely knew. But the 34-year-old now supervises five employees amid rows of small cubicles who spend eight hours a day dialing numbers across the United States. He is among thousands of deported Mexicans who are finding refuge in call centers in Tijuana and other border cities. In perfect English — some hardly speak Spanish — they converse with American consumers who buy gadgets, have questions about warrantees or complain about overdue deliveries."


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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:45 PM

When it comes to deportation, its usually a loss win situation. But in the case of Mexicans who once lived a life on US soil from since birth and having been deported later on in life, adjusting to a new life in a new world is challenging. The comfort of being able to work in an environment that reminds them of being back home eliviates the agony of being separated from their family back in the US. The outsourced phone companies give these deported individual an opportunity to be able to participate in a life they once lived by being able to interact with Americans. While they make subsequently less than what they were making in the states, the opportunity of being able to work in a foreign land is one that they are forever grateful for.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 14, 2014 10:49 PM

This article is similar to the topic of outsourcing jobs to the United states, only it is the reverse, with deportees being giving jobs at call centers in the city of Tijuana. It brings up the topic of culture shock and the differences between Mexican and United States Economies.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 2015 3:33 PM

Brings to mind the whole debate over over illegals vs. legals, work visas and work permits, political change and citizenship. So many factors are present in the decisions these Mexican born, living in America, deported back to their home country, must make. How culturally shocking it must be to be living the American Dream in an area that is bi-lingual, San Diego, and be deported back to Tijuana, making $150 a week.

It's a blessing and a curse for both sides of the border. The USA loses tax revenue from the money Henry was bringing in while working in real estate, conversely Mexico gains a smaller slice of the tax given his drop in pay. He clearly was happy and productive here, but others such as the gang member mentioned, may make the USA happier by taking his gang affiliation with him. Not good for Mexico, but perhaps he can make a fresh start in that country.

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Map Shows All The Devices In The World Connected To The Internet | IFLScience

Map Shows All The Devices In The World Connected To The Internet | IFLScience | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The image above isn’t your average map: it shows the location of all devices connected to the Internet in the world. The redder the area, the more devices there are.
Alexandra Piggott's insight:

This is a great representation of core and periphery areas and also illustrates the edigital divde that exists.

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EU debates biopiracy law to protect indigenous people

EU debates biopiracy law to protect indigenous people | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Pharmaceutical companies would need to compensate indigenous people for using their knowhow in creating new medicines

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:27 PM

APHG-Unit 4

Shawn Wright's curator insight, September 7, 2014 8:20 AM

The  Nagoya protocol is an international biological diversity convention. The protocol would at it's core require permission, acknowledgment of source knowledge  or practice and compensation for the use of cultural wisdom.


i don't see Nagoya as a perfect solution - there is a lot of room for language interpretation so slick corporate lawyers will find ways to legally cheat indigenous peoples from their share but I do see it as at least A small step in the right direction.   


The World Health Organisation estimates that 4 billion people, 80% of the world's population, use herbal medicine in primary healthcare. 


Cherokees Believe and have practiced healing from plant and water for thousands of years. Every and any human sickness has a plant who can cure it. Every plant in the world has a purpose if we but learn to hear and understand what that is - there are no weeds to the Cherokee.


Yona Shawn

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 27, 12:31 PM
unit 5
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The Silicon Savannah – an insider’s view

The Silicon Savannah – an insider’s view | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
This article by Kenneth Griffith originally appeared on LinkedIn and is published with permission. Nairobi has gotten a lot of press over the past few years as the rising "Silicon Savannah" of Africa - a hub for tech start-ups in Sub-Saharan Africa. Most of the press is legit, but there is also a bit of hype. I've been a participant in Nairobi's tech scene since 2012 when I discovered the iHub, a year after moving here in 2011. I thought I would share my notes here for those who want to get a real picture of what is going on in the "Silicon Savannah." Overview - What is the Silicon Savannah? Kenya is the classic "savanna" climate, with massive grasslands supporting large herds of animals. Likening Nairobi's tech scene to Silicon Valley gave rise to the moniker "Silicon Savannah". iHub - Where it Began Though Nairobi had successful tech start-ups before, such as Cellulant and Craft Silicon, the creation of the iHub was the beginning of Nairobi's start-up culture taking on its own identity. The iHub was started in 2010 by the guys from Usahidi. It serves as a convergence point for techies, entrepreneurs and investors, leading to a vibrant culture of tech start-ups, and start-up hubs that have sprung up around the iHub within a four kilometer stretch of Ngong Road in Kilimani. The list of tech spaces in this part of town now includes: The iHub Growth Africa Startup Garage Nailab M-Lab In addition to the accelerator spaces, there are three universities in Nairobi…

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The Ocean Cleanup, developing technologies to extract, prevent and intercept plastic pollution

The Ocean Cleanup, developing technologies to extract, prevent and intercept plastic pollution | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

Help cleaning the oceans!


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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 16, 2014 11:54 AM

Help cleaning the oceans!


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40 maps that explain the internet

40 maps that explain the internet | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Where the internet came from, how it works, and how it's used by people around the world
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The Ship-Breakers

The Ship-Breakers | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
In Bangladesh men desperate for work perform one of the world’s most dangerous jobs.

Via Seth Dixon
Alexandra Piggott's insight:

Despite massive advances in transporting goods rapidly around our ever increasing connected world, little thought is spared for how we mamage the waste stream. MEDC benefitf rom accessing the range of goods but LEDC have to deal with the dismantling of the transport modes. 

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Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:58 AM

Besides that scrap metal pollutes water and rivers, this is a health risk for humans too. I also know someone who worked at Electric Boat at the Air Base in North Kingstown who's health was also affected due to metal scraps and particles in the air. Years later after working at EB he developed lung cancer. Metal erodes away as well, especially when left sitting in salt water. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:54 AM

this is both amazing and horrifying in what these people do on a daily basis. i cannot imagine doing what these guys do everyday, and i never imagined how taking apart one of these ships would work.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:16 AM

What happens to massive cargo vessels after they are outdated?  There are tons of scrap metal, but they aren't

designed to be taken apart.  The ship-breakers of South Asia (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan are 3 of the 4 global leaders in recycling ships) risk much to mine this resource.  This is an economic function that is a part of a globalized economy, but one than was never intended.  There are major health risks to the workers and pollutants to the local community that are endemic in this industry that manages to survive on the scraps of the global economy.


Tags: Bangladesh,  South Asia, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | IB Geography HL Extension PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 10, 2015 7:28 PM

The yellow represents desert and with no rainfall what are you going to grow. the white area is the area that gets plenty of rain, good farmland for raising livestock, excellent natural harbors and resources. the yellow upper part probably is not desert but I bet its cold up there.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:08 PM

this seems like the same sort of situation that Egypt has, it seems like a good sized area but the large deserts make most of it uninhabitable, the country's livable space is much less than you would think.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:17 PM
What we have here is a representation of the desert area that only 2% of the population lives in, this is because to sustain life, you need high amounts of water to grow food which will never happen here and then the white being the mainly inhabited areas. These areas are mainly inhabited because of sufficient rainfall which makes agriculture good and good enough to sustain populations of people.