IB Geography Hazards and Disaster - risk assessment and response PEMBROKE
88 views | +0 today
Follow
IB Geography Hazards and Disaster - risk assessment and response PEMBROKE
A range of articles related to IB Geography Option Topic D
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Alexandra Piggott from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

This is what Louisiana stands to lose in the next 50 years

This is what Louisiana stands to lose in the next 50 years | IB Geography Hazards and Disaster - risk assessment and response PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The USGS says sea-level rise and sinking could claim up to 4,677 square miles of land along the coast if the state doesn’t implement major restoration plans.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
James Hobson's curator insight, September 15, 2014 9:23 AM

(North America topic 2)
This interactive map is an excellent tool for researching how low-lying delta areas such as southern Mississippi have changed over recent years, and for what underlying reasons. Although human activity has been largely responsible for the loss of valuable marshland (land development, canals, levees), it's nice to know that in some cases human activity has actually helped to promote it, even if it was not originally intended to do so.

It makes you think: what other unintended consequences human actions are having on the environment in other places and on other scales?

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 28, 2014 9:24 PM

Is very crazy that soon these land will be gone. What really makes me worry is that in a few years all these land in Louisiana will be gone, what is going to happen to all these people who is living right know in these areas? What action government will take? This is a very worrying situation.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 11:04 AM

If I lived in Louisiana, I wouldn’t settle down near the coast. 2,000 square miles will be lost in about 80 years. The water will have risen to 4.3 feet, and Louisiana has an average height of 3 feet. That leaves everything outside of the protective levees underwater in due time. Many pipelines that serve 90% of the nation’s offshore energy production and 30% of its gas and oil supply that goes to 31 different states and over 2 million people will all need to find a new place to live if this continues. Once home to 700 people south of New Orleans is now home to nearly 15 residents. The water level has already been ruining homes for people in Louisiana.  

Rescooped by Alexandra Piggott from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Drying of the Aral Sea

Explore a global timelapse of our planet, constructed from Landsat satellite imagery. With water diverted to irrigation, the inland Aral Sea has shrunk drama...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kaitlin Young's curator insight, October 7, 2014 11:27 AM

The Aral Sea’s receding waters could prove fatal to the surrounding agriculture. Both Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan diverted the rivers that flowed into the Sea in the 1960s to feed their growing cotton and rice farms. Over the last five decades, the lack of a water source flowing into the Aral Sea combined with harsher droughts due to climate change have caused the water to evaporate at an alarming rate. As the water evaporates, large deposits of minerals remain on the bare lake bed. Winds pick up the mineral deposits and often spread them onto farms, where the increased salinity destroys rice paddies and other crops. The destruction of crops causes less food production, so less money is made by the farmers and more money has to be spent to bring in food to avoid famine. Cotton crops are also destroyed, so the region loses yet another source of income.

The increased evaporation of the Aral Sea has also caused an incredible increase to salinity levels in the lake itself. The extremely salty water cannot be used without heavy removing the salt, which is incredibly unaffordable in an already stressed region. Small subsidence farmers and local farmers cannot use the resource at hand. The fishing industry has completely collapsed, thus removing another important resource from the area.

If a wounded economy and unreliable food was not enough, the air born minerals blown away from the lake are causing numerous health problems. Respiratory issues, such as asthma, are becoming more and more common in the communities surrounding the Aral Sea due to the minerals and industrial debris in the air. The disappearance of the Sea has created the perfect conditions for the collapse of a region. The struggle that the people have to endure often escalates into increased social and political unrest, and disputes often occur. The Aral Sea exemplifies how one small environmental change can set off a chain of devastating events that lead to irreversible effects.

               

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:19 PM

The drying of the Aral Sea opens our eyes to how fragile our environment is and the scarcity of resources.  We need to become more aware of our resources, because as they saying goes, the "well will run dry."

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 1:14 PM

The massive changes to the Aral Sea can clearly be seen through the course of a decade. It's so unbelievable that from 2000 on ward it shrunk significantly and the video also showed the development of agricultural land that surrounds the rivers feeding into the Sea. The more water being irrigated and are not putting into the Sea the more it dries up because the water is evaporated with little to no rain going back to it. This is definitely one of the worst man-made disaster that have happened to this region.

Rescooped by Alexandra Piggott from green infographics
Scoop.it!

The Real Impact Of Environmental Disasters [Infographic]

The Real Impact Of Environmental Disasters [Infographic] | IB Geography Hazards and Disaster - risk assessment and response PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

When an environmental disaster occurs, it can be devastating to ecosystems. More often that not, the public only hears about these incidents when they first become a problem.What we don’t often hear about is the fact that the ramifications of such incidents reach far and wide – impacting the environment for years and years to come.

The monetary and health-related consequences of these types of disasters are enormous. Cleanup costs, the initial costs associated with a disaster are defined as the amount it will take to return the affected area to normal. What isn’t accounted for in these “cleanup costs,” is the impact on communities and wildlife that will span decades. Oftentimes, the true impact of a disaster isn’t truly known for years.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Russell Roberts's curator insight, November 25, 2013 11:26 PM

Something to think about, whether it be a molasses spill in Honolulu Harbor or a major oil well rupture in the Gulf of Mexico.  The effects of such man-made disasters  can linger for years and do untold damage to our fragile environment.  Aloha, Russ.

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, December 2, 2013 7:44 PM

Visual.ly tells the story in a way that no one else can. The best of words and images, together.

Rescooped by Alexandra Piggott from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Typhoon Haiyan Before & After

Typhoon Haiyan Before & After | IB Geography Hazards and Disaster - risk assessment and response PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
View interactive before and after images showing the devastation Typhoon Haiyan has caused in Tacloban City, Philippines.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:01 PM

A great set of photos to show the great destructive force of a storm on coastlines. The Philippines are a bunch of small islands made up of primarily coastlines so this typhoon destroyed huge amounts of the country.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 2014 1:16 PM

We know that natural disasters cause a lot of damage and personal loss but we don't really ever know how much damage is caused until we see it.  Even when we do see it if we don't know what it looked like before it really doesn't mean anything to us.  Using these before and after maps you can really understand how much destruction happened when the typhoon hit the Philippines.  You can see the loss of property, infrastructure and natural resources that were once there.  The loss of not only peoples homes, but entire neighborhoods wiped right off the map.  The remnants of roads can be seen but that is all they are, remnants.  The ability to see the before as well as the after really strikes a toll and makes people realize that this is serious and not just another storm for the people that live here.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:51 PM

Such powerful imagery. I was tinkering around with the pictures and moving the scroller from right to left, keeping my eye on a particular house that stood before the typhoon. To keep scrolling to the left and to watch that image of the house completely disappear was absolutely surreal. It made the news of the devastation wrought by the storm seem so much more real; here I was, sitting in class and watching a home- a place where a family once lived, where lives had been and were continuing to be forged- completely disappear from the face of the map, never to return. I have lived in the same home for 15 years, and I could never imagine watching my home disappear in such a manner. The psychological impact of this devastation on such a massive scale is unimaginable, something that must be endured in order to truly understand- and, unfortunately for the people living in these areas, they now understand it all too well. The financial recovery from this storm will eventually come- perhaps not as fast as hoped, but it will, as always- but the recovery in human costs will take much longer. For those affected, many will believe that there can never be a recovery. Watching that home disappear in the blink of an eye makes me feel that they are probably right.

Scooped by Alexandra Piggott
Scoop.it!

Opening the floodgates

Opening the floodgates | IB Geography Hazards and Disaster - risk assessment and response PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
CHINA has many good reasons not to build the $5.2 billion Xiaonanhai dam on the Yangzi river in Chongqing. The site, on a gentle slope that moves water along only...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alexandra Piggott
Scoop.it!

BBC NEWS | Special Reports | Disaster risk increasing, says UN

BBC NEWS | Special Reports | Disaster risk increasing, says UN | IB Geography Hazards and Disaster - risk assessment and response PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Poor disaster planning is increasing the risks of disaster impact around the world, a UN report says.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Alexandra Piggott from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Watch the Earth Warm Since 1880

Watch the Earth Warm Since 1880 | IB Geography Hazards and Disaster - risk assessment and response PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"It can be difficult to conceive of the long process that's led the world to having its nine hottest years on record all after 2000. That's why it's nice that NASA has generated this nifty animation, which shows temperature abnormalities for every month of the past 13 decades. Watch reddish warm zones spread over the globe as time rolls past, like a virulent fever covering the body of a sick host."

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Alexandra Piggott from Southmoore AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Haiti still in ruins four years after quake

Haiti still in ruins four years after quake | IB Geography Hazards and Disaster - risk assessment and response PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Reconstruction efforts are dragging as country marks anniversary of violent quake that killed more than 250,000 people.

Via Mr. David Burton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Alexandra Piggott from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
Scoop.it!

What happens when the world dries out

What happens when the world dries out | IB Geography Hazards and Disaster - risk assessment and response PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
As the atmosphere warms, the impact on the world's drylands could alter the chemistry of the soil as well as increasing its aridity.

Via Mary Williams
more...
Mary Williams's curator insight, November 2, 2013 4:09 AM

Nice summary of this new article in Nature,

"Decoupling of soil nutrient cycles as a function of aridity in global drylands"

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v502/n7473/full/nature12670.html

John Purificati's comment, November 4, 2013 6:10 AM
Bonnie, you're most welcome.
Scooped by Alexandra Piggott
Scoop.it!

How Density Makes Us Safer During Natural Disasters

How Density Makes Us Safer During Natural Disasters | IB Geography Hazards and Disaster - risk assessment and response PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
After Hurricane Sandy, tight neighborhoods and centralized infrastructure recovered more quickly than spread-out areas.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Alexandra Piggott from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Climographs

Climographs | IB Geography Hazards and Disaster - risk assessment and response PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 2013 1:54 PM

Climographs chart the monthly temperature and rainfall data and are a useful tool is studying climatology.  Here are links to dozens of selected United States and International cities that come from the National Drought Mitigation Center.  The image above is a climograph of Providence, RI.


Tags: physical, weather and climate, Rhode Island, statistics, visualization.

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:15 AM

Climographs are used to show the temperature and precipitation within an area monthly. This collection of data allows us to see the climate changes that occur monthly with in an area to better understand its weather patterns.

Rescooped by Alexandra Piggott from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Climate Change Infographic

Climate Change Infographic | IB Geography Hazards and Disaster - risk assessment and response PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ignacio Conejo Moreno's curator insight, March 3, 2013 6:52 AM

Chungo futuro se nos presenta, si no cambiamos nuestros hábitos!

Emily Ross Cook's curator insight, March 4, 2013 8:44 AM

Humans must change their ways - what are some real life recommendations for changing?

mrjacquot's curator insight, March 6, 2013 8:48 PM

For all the doubters...