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Plicker- use a simple app to run interactive quizzes with not hard ware required. It is a low tech - high tech solution!

Plicker- use a simple app to run interactive quizzes with not hard ware required. It is a low tech - high tech solution! | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

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Alexandra Piggott's insight:

Great little fast feedback app. 

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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, March 16, 1:39 AM

Use a simple smart phone and Data show to run an interactive quiz and get direct and instant feedback form your students. Fantastic little app - very easy to set up and to use the students enjoy it and all the results are right there.

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Moving towards meeting MDG 1: 15 achievements on poverty and hunger

Moving towards meeting MDG 1: 15 achievements on poverty and hunger | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
In the years since the MDGs were launched, 74 countries have halved their levels of poverty and 173 million fewer people experience chronic hunger

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oyndrila's curator insight, March 4, 6:27 AM

Lets hope more people are pulled out of poverty in years to come!

Cass Allan's curator insight, March 5, 7:03 AM

millennium development goals. Positive news

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Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"


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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, February 7, 7:51 PM

After studying this comparison tool and using it to find the best of the best and worst of the worst, I picked out some highlights I'd like to share. Monaco is clearly the place to be born, earn, and live. When compared to the USA, the infant mortality rate is 71% less, the life expectancy is 10 years longer @ 84, and you'll earn 62% more money, no doubt because you have ten more years in which to do so. I believe the stats may be skewed a bit in this country comparison as the very rich live there and they have access to the best medical care, and probably don't have very many infants with them when they make the move from elsewhere, hence the low infant mortality rate. Austria is not a bad second choice as you are 33% less likely to be unemployed. On a sobering note, the life expectancy if you live in Namibia is only 52! Yikes, I'm already 53... It's far worse however in Swaziland. The life expectancy is sadly only 50.5 years and you are 44 times more likely to have AIDS than if you lived here. 26.5% of the population has AIDS! Be thankful for where you live and stop complaining, it's far worse on average in nearly all other countries.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 4:59 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home. 


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High Security Borders

High Security Borders | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Accelerated through the fear from the attacks of 9/11 and all what followed, the so called ‘Western Society’ is constructing the greatest wall ever build on this planet. On different building sites on all five inhabitable continents, walls, fences and high-tech border surveillance are under construction in order to secure the citizens and their high quality of life within this system. The fall of the Berlin Wall was described as the historical moment that marks the demolition of world’s last barrier between nation states. Yet it took the European Union only six years to create with the Schengen Agreement in 1995 a new division only 80km offset to the east of Berlin.

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Miles Gibson's curator insight, February 13, 11:04 AM

Unit 4 political geography 

This article explains how the world is filled with division and segregation. Some of the most notable are the walls are the wall in berlin, the wall/border/river/fence between the u.s. and mexico and the border between north and south Korea is the most notable walls.

This article relates to unit 4 because it shows how people, through borders, have divided them through history creating new politics, culture and borders themselves. The political processes involved can change the policies and shapes of nations in the world.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 4:48 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This map shows that hi-tech political surveillance of borders is highly correlated with the core areas of the global economy and some of the most attractive immigrant destinations.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What else do you see in this map?  What does this say about the world order?  Are there patterns that this map reveals/conceals?   


tom cockburn's curator insight, February 27, 5:19 AM

More than simple  'culture clash' or  'politics of fear' etc

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Slavery Footprint

How many slaves work for you? There are 27 million slaves in the world today. Many of them contribute to the supply chains that end up in the products we use every day. Find out how many slaves work for you, and take action.

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Too rich for its own good

Too rich for its own good | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The Democratic Republic of Congo is potentially one of the richest countries on earth, but colonialism, slavery and corruption have turned it into one of the poorest

Via Seth Dixon
Alexandra Piggott's insight:

An example of how conflict, curruption and the legacy of history can have a devastating impact on the likelihood of a country or area to make progress along the development journey and to imporove the quality of life of its citizens. 

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Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 8:04 PM

I read this article on the Congo and was blown away at the greed of man and by the frequency of the absolute raping of the country by Portugal and Belgium. this country, so rich in natural resources has been forced into poverty and deplorable living conditions by the greed of men. The rubber trees that The Congo has led to the exportation of rubber and other products to the US and Europe as the car industry was in its infancy. Congo should have profited from this handsomely but instead its leaders decided to make the treasury their own little bank account. Instead of investing in infrastructure, services for their citizens, and education, monies went to personal bank accounts and 100 million dollar palaces.

Congo has among its natural resources, Coltan, found in all cell phones, that should bring in enough revenue to bring this country to prosperity. I hope the leaders do the right thing and build for the people the promise that has been waiting for them for over six centuries.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 26, 3:16 PM

It is sad that the Congo is in the current state it is in, the country is very rich in material resources but remains strikingly poor.  The country has been subjugated by poor treatment from the powers of Europe for centuries.  The Portuguese, English, and Belgians all destroyed the country over the years.  The Portuguese were the first to do so, as they wanted the man power to work in the new world, and this also helped the English who had their own new world colonies, the two European groups worked well with each other to plunder the country, which was once a thriving kingdom of manpower.  Things really started going bad for the Congo once the Belgians stepped in and made it their own colony during the African Land Grab.  As the article explains, all its goods were used by the West for years to come (for bullets in WWI, for components of the Atom Bomb in WWII, and even for Cell Phone Components).  Even once the Belgians left, the country was no better off, due to the fact that the indigenous people did not know how to run their own country, how could they after years of domination.  So what happened logically, is that a strong man took over and ran the country as a dictatorship.  Even today, the country remains unstable because after he was thrown out of power the country destabilized and fought Civil Wars in which its neighbors would pick sides.  This article shows that resources can be a dangerous thing for countries to have, outsiders will invade and destabilize them in order to advance their own agendas.  Europe has certainly left a great deal of scars across Africa.

 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 5:02 PM

It is a shame and extremely sad that the people of the Congo can not capitalize on their natural resources to make better lives for themselves.  This country has been ravaged and taken advantage of by outsiders for hundreds of years.  During this time these countries have gotten rich while these people live in poverty.  

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Seaside towns struggling to cope with ageing population as figures show more than a third in some areas are over 65

Seaside towns struggling to cope with ageing population as figures show more than a third in some areas are over 65 | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
MPs warned that without urgent investment some areas will struggle to retain the working age families needed to fuel the economies of towns dominated by old people’s homes.
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Impacts of concentrations of elderly people.

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Global overpopulation would ‘withstand war, disasters and disease’

Global overpopulation would ‘withstand war, disasters and disease’ | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
National Academy of Sciences says even brutal world conflict or lethal pandemic would leave unsustainable human numbers
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New insights into the changing global population

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Maps Mania

Maps Mania | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Google Maps Mania is an blog tracking the websites, mashups and tools created with the Google Maps API.
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Awesome map blog with loads of really cool maps of all sorts of things. Also shows you how to use some of the google maps features.

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5 consumer products linked to illegal rainforest destruction

5 consumer products linked to illegal rainforest destruction | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

Tropical rainforests are home to rich indigenous cultures and amazing biodiversity. They also play an important role in stabilizing the climate and sequestering carbon. However, tropical deforestation continues to happen around the world at an alarming rate. This loss generates almost 50 percent more greenhouse gases than the world’s entire transportation sector, according to the most recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report.

A large amount of tropical deforestation is driven by the creation of agricultural land, but a new report from Forest Trends finds that nearly half of all conversion from primary rainforest to agricultural use happens illegally. A few key agricultural products drive most of the deforestation, and are largely produced for export.


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Working on water

Working on water | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Architect Kunle Adeyemi sets out to solve the issues of flooding and overcrowding in Nigeria's waterside slums.

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Ebola striking women more frequently than men

Ebola striking women more frequently than men | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Their social and economic roles in West Africa make them more likely to contract the virus.
Alexandra Piggott's insight:

An interesting conectin to the issues around gender and geography

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As World’s Population Booms, Will Its Resources Be Enough for Us?

As World’s Population Booms, Will Its Resources Be Enough for Us? | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
As world population projections soar, there are rising concerns about the impact billions more people will have on the planet.

Via Andy Dorn
Alexandra Piggott's insight:

What is our carrying capacity?

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Truthbehere2's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:52 PM

Hopefully when things get cramped..I'm long gone and dead, and that my daughter will be taught to have 2 kids and pass that idea down to her kids.

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These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa

These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"African countries are also quite diverse from an ethnic standpoint. As the Washington Post's Max Fisher noted back in 2013, the world's 20 most ethnically diverse countries are all African, partially because European colonial powers divvied up sections of the continent with little regard for how the residents would have organized the land themselves. This map above shows Africa's ethnographic regions as identified by George Murdock in his 1959 ethnography of the continent."

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, political, language, ethnicity.


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Madison & Morgan's curator insight, April 8, 1:40 PM

This article explains Africa's area and geography. African countries are one of the most ethnically diverse countries in the world. European colonial powers divided up sections of the continent which caused the residents to organize land themselves.

Jackson and Marduk's curator insight, April 9, 1:04 AM

Social: This map shows the ethnic diversity found in Africa. The cultures are all unique, and often conflicting. The regions are smallest and most abundant near the middle, and get larger and more scarce near the top and bottom. Although many people think all Africans are the same, it would be similar to say that Americans and Canadians are the same, because they are their own separate countries with unique cultures.

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 1:12 PM

This country is clearly more diverse than the world as a whole. It looks like some one taped up the boarders of Africa and splashed paint through out. 

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The ‘Quiet Chernobyl’: The Aral Sea

The ‘Quiet Chernobyl’: The Aral Sea | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"Prior to the 1960’s, the Aral Sea was the fourth largest lake and approximately the size of Ireland. Fed by both the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers carrying snowmelt from the mountains to the southeast, the Aral Sea moderated the climate and provided a robust fishing industry that straddled the present-day border between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. For the map savvy, that Aral Sea would be almost unrecognizable—it has long appeared as two basins known as the North and the South Aral Sea since the rivers were diverted for crops, leading to the Aral Sea’s alarming shrinkage. Recent NASA satellite imagery shows the decline that the Aral Sea has undergone since 2000, leaving the South Aral Sea completely dried up in 2014. "

 

Tags: podcast, Maps 101, historical, environment, Central Asia, environment modify, Aral Sea.


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Wideo - Make animated online videos free

Wideo - Make animated online videos free | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Make a video online with wideo! Create professional marketing videos. Try out our video templates. Create explainer videos.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 17, 1:43 AM
Make a video online with wideo! Create professional marketing videos. Try out our video templates. Create explainer videos.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-tools-for-teaching-people-and-learners/?tag=animation


Jarrod Johnson's curator insight, February 17, 4:26 PM

One example of online video creation.

Alison Rostetter's curator insight, February 21, 12:54 PM

I'm always on the lookout for a good, easy-to-use video/animation maker as 'home-made' videos often inject some life into grammar and, when you learn something with pictures, I think it makes the learning more memorable.

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Adventures in Population Growth

Adventures in Population Growth | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"The International Database at the US Census Bureau [provides] population estimates broken down by country, age and year for essentially every country. [With this data we can track] shifts in population makeup over time. I’ve created a few interesting graphs to show the expected shifts over the next 35 years, including the dependency ratio."


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Kristen Trammell's curator insight, March 23, 12:52 PM

I. International Database for the US Census Bureau created graphs representing population estimates broken down by country, age, and year. These graphs show the population shifts over 35 years of major countries. 

 

II. Developed nations show a column shape with a pointed top. Developed nations have equal amounts of males and females, and have a higher population of 30-50 year olds. With a high number of middle aged people and a low number of elderly people, developed nations remain stable due to a stable birth rate and death rate. Developing countries have a pyramid shaped population, with many young people and few 50-100 years olds. This leads to a weak economy as their is high unemployment. Developing countries also have overall higher populations, which leads to poverty as their is a lack of resources. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 11:31 AM

UNIT 2 POPULATION
This article depicts various population pyramids in developing, as well as developed countries. These pyramids show trends from the past, as well as predictions for the future (2050). With population pyramids, it is easy to understand how populations shift, as well as observe different trends on populations. I really like studying the information given to us by population pyramids, so this article is very important to me. This whole thing relates to historical trends and projections for the future. 

Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 5, 8:18 PM

GTAV AC:G Y10 - Geographies of human wellbeing

CD - The reasons for spatial variations between countries in selected indicators of  human wellbeing

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The saddest thing in the world is not poverty; it's loss of dignity | Jonathan Glennie

The saddest thing in the world is not poverty; it's loss of dignity | Jonathan Glennie | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Jonathan Glennie: Development is more than just achieving outcomes – it implies a different way of seeing the world and fellow human beings

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One in four British children now living in poverty, reveals Unicef

One in four British children now living in poverty, reveals Unicef | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Unicef blamed government cuts for the increase in child poverty since the recession in 2008 - claiming it was 'no accident' that it had risen in the UK but fallen in 18 other countries.
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Poverty in MEDCs.

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Child poverty up in more than half of developed world since 2008

Child poverty up in more than half of developed world since 2008 | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Unicef report finds number of children entering poverty during global recession is 2.6 million greater than number lifted out of it
Alexandra Piggott's insight:

Does this connect to the MDGs?

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Jocelyn Stoller's curator insight, October 28, 2014 9:05 PM

Thanks to the spread of extreme neoliberalismausterity-based cuts in safety net and social services, unfettered markets and undermining of firewalls and financial regulations, and unrestrained redistribution of wealth to the already affluent via regressive tax policies (otherwise known as Supply Side "Trickle Down" economics). Behind all this is a media "noise machine" that has convinced large segments of the middle class to vote against their own interests to the detriment of society as a whole. Unfortunately, this is about to happen again.

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Contour Education

Contour Education | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
CE
Alexandra Piggott's insight:

Really useful website supporting spatial literacy. Mick Law runs the website and he is really helpful and adds great resources and how to you tube clips. 

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What Does Earth Look Like?


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 27, 2014 12:37 PM

Unit 1

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:51 AM

APHG-Unit 1

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:18 AM

Mapping and Satellite Imagery

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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


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Max Minard's curator insight, March 22, 9:04 PM

This map shows the average age for every country based on its own individual population. It even provides the oldest and youngest countries with Niger being the youngest country on average and Germany and Japan tied for the oldest country on average. certain patterns can be seen on the map such as the green areas (teens as median age) being mainly centered is almost all of Africa. The other areas are in the twenties. Based on this information, one can safely assume that the average global ages correlates with the relative development of each country and it s success in domestic health care. Having this allows for their population to have a larger life expectancy and therefore a higher average age based on its overall population. 

Kristen Trammell's curator insight, March 23, 12:05 PM

I. Using the data from CIA Facebook, global post created a map illustrating the median ages of countries around the world. The world’s fifteen youngest countries are all located in Africa. The high number of teenagers in developed countries leads to youth unemployment which leads to the countries being “hampered by weak economies.” 

 

II. The distribution of ages effects countries by “weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.” Although countries with a fixed population of a young age can be detrimental, a country with an aging population can lead to a declining birth rate. This leads to labor shortages in the future which additionally stifles the economy.  

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 23, 7:08 PM

Demographics seemingly started with age as a metric many years ago and have evolved into marketing tools, political footballs, and ways to combat everything from obesity to social security. Africa is clearly the youngest and probably for a very morbid reason; AIDS and Ebola among other diseases have taken their toll on the sexually active and thus have reduced the average age of their population.

Germany seems to be the place to go for a job as the labor shortage will mean higher wages for the folks who are left. Japan has another issue; a healthy aging population that will strain the government's ability to financially take care of them.

I wonder if the unevenness of Europe is an indication of the two World wars that were fought mostly on the turf. Did some countries lose more than others? If more soldiers, presumably of baby making age, perished did this affect the countries ability to keep pace with the Germany's and Spain's of Europe?

Diet seems to play a large part as well as the Mediterranean is well represented in terms of age. Does their healthy diet of fish, nuts, legumes and olive oil make a difference?

I could spend all day postulating, but I'll leave some of the findings for you to discover...

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America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young

America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"Although we seldom think about them this way, most American communities as they exist today were built for the spry and mobile. We've constructed millions of multi-story, single-family homes where the master bedroom is on the second floor, where the lawn outside requires weekly upkeep, where the mailbox is a stroll away. We've designed neighborhoods where everyday errands require a driver's license. We've planned whole cities where, if you don't have a car, it's not particularly easy to walk anywhere — especially not if you move gingerly.

This reality has been a fine one for a younger country. Those multi-story, single-family homes with broad lawns were great for Baby Boomers when they had young families. And car-dependent suburbs have been fine for residents with the means and mobility to drive everywhere. But as the Baby Boomers whose preferences drove a lot of these trends continue to age, it's becoming increasingly clear that the housing and communities we've built won't work very well for the old."


Via Seth Dixon
Alexandra Piggott's insight:

This is also an issue in Australia where the overwhelming majority of people live in single story dwellings and are very car reliant.

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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, September 22, 2014 12:47 PM

This reality is detrimental to the future of our society because it focuses on the now rather than looking into long terms on how these changes will impact our world in the long run. Looking at the way our society is progressing, these changes are relevant in major metropolitan cities, where the job market is attractive to the young rather than those with over 30 years of experience. In our society, not many see retirement being in the center of the city. Creating a society that accommodates both the young and the old, along with the married and unmarried is pivotal to the progression of  our ever changing world. 

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 8:59 PM

I can definitely see this as a real problem. Both my Uncle and my Great Uncle moved their condos from ones that had numerous steps to climb to the second floor to more elder-friendly options. My Great Uncle even went a step further to move him and his wife to a senior living community, where there food, entertainment, etc. is all provided within an enclosed neighbourhood with other people of their age group. More of these communities that act like oversized retirement homes could be the answer. They give the illusion of suburban living, something the baby boomers liked, while providing the accessibility they need.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 12:27 PM

APHG- HW Option 1

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Carbon map – which countries are responsible for climate change?

Carbon map – which countries are responsible for climate change? | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
As heads of state from David Cameron to Barack Obama meet in New York for a UN climate summit hosted by Ban Ki-moon, expectations are high for bold commitments on cutting greenhouse gas emissions
Alexandra Piggott's insight:

Great interactive resource that allows clsoer examination of the relationship between wealth, carbon and the impacts of the changes.

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