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Articles related to the changing geography - population resources and development
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What can I do with a Geography Degree?

What can I do with a Geography Degree? | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"While it is easy to understand getting excited about maps, different cultures and environments, and even being better citizens through geography, it is harder to see how geographic knowledge can lead to good jobs or meaningful careers. In recent years, people have discovered that large numbers of societal problems have geographic dimensions, and that education and training in geography provides essential skills and knowledge for real-world problem solving. As a result, geography has become a necessary ingredient in hundreds of different jobs. This assortment of careers helps demonstrate the wide array of employment opportunities that exist for graduates with education in the field of geography. Within this publication, careers are divided into a number of different employment categories, including:

​Geography EducationEnvironmental GeographyGeospatial TechnologiesLand Use Planning
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Sally Egan's curator insight, February 7, 7:48 PM
Great for introducing the vocational relevance of geography.
Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 15, 3:04 PM
Geographic Concepts: Geographic Perspective and Geographic Skills And Careers
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, February 27, 10:36 AM
what can i do with a degree in geography? ALOT!
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Mr. Varley's APHG site

Mr. Varley's APHG site | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"Welcome to Mr. Varley’s AP Human Geography website. Scroll over ‘AP Human Geography’ located above to find a drop-down menu for each unit."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 3:55 PM

There are many great teacher sites; this one has the great unit-specific resources as well as a student-produced "Motherload review packet."  Consider having your students collaboratively produce their own review packet.

 

Tags: geography education, APHG.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, January 28, 9:26 PM
Some themes and resources that may be able to be adapted for pre-service teachers.
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Google's satellite timelapses show the inconvenient truth about our planet

Google's satellite timelapses show the inconvenient truth about our planet | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Google’s new Timelapse project allows you to see how anywhere in the world has changed in the last 32 years; from evaporating lakes to exploding cities, it’s a document of recklessness
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The World in 2016 - Views of the World

The World in 2016 - Views of the World | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The world is ever changing. This year, we live on a planet of 7.4 billion people who contribute products and services worth approximately US$80 trillion in nominal terms. However, population and wealth as measured in GDP activity are not distributed … Continue reading →
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A great site for map fans!
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Dirty Danube: looming pollution threats to the world’s most international river

Dirty Danube: looming pollution threats to the world’s most international river | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
After barely surviving decades of pollution during the communist era, the Danube is facing new threats from microplastics, pesticides and pharma waste
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The worlds most international river
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Urban India and its female demographic dividend

Urban India and its female demographic dividend | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Read more about Urban India and its female demographic dividend on Business Standard. India's urban female work-force participation rate is growing 5.6% annually since 1991, in comparison with 2% for rural females and 3% for urban males
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The flow towards Europe - Lucify

Europe is experiencing the biggest refugee crisis since World War II. Based on data from the United Nations, we clarify the scale of the crisis.
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great analysis of the flows of people 
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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 26, 2014 4:04 PM

Population unit

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 2015 1:51 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This video was about how demographers categorize data and analyze it. This video showed a few different population pyramids in order to show differences in population in different countries. It showed China as an example and pointed out the remnants of the one child policy 35 years before and how the number of men were higher due to sex selective abortions. They also talked about how the population pyramids could show what stage in the demographic transition model a country was in and how they use them to predict future patterns and changes. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it covers topics such as population change, demographic transition models, sex composition, population policies and much more. Population pyramids are very useful due to the visualization of sex, age and number composition in a countries population. They are very important in the use of predicting the future change in population because it can tell what the population has gone through in the past and what to expect in the DTM. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 10:43 PM

This video illustrates how population pyramids have the ability to show how populations will rise and fall over time. Pyramids specifically show the population based on a specific age, and illustrates a country's amount of young people in comparison to the elderly. 

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Plicker- use a simple app to run interactive quizzes with not hard ware required. It is a low tech - high tech solution!

Plicker- use a simple app to run interactive quizzes with not hard ware required. It is a low tech - high tech solution! | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the title

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Great little fast feedback app. 

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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, March 16, 2015 1:39 AM

Use a simple smart phone and Data show to run an interactive quiz and get direct and instant feedback form your students. Fantastic little app - very easy to set up and to use the students enjoy it and all the results are right there.

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Moving towards meeting MDG 1: 15 achievements on poverty and hunger

Moving towards meeting MDG 1: 15 achievements on poverty and hunger | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
In the years since the MDGs were launched, 74 countries have halved their levels of poverty and 173 million fewer people experience chronic hunger

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oyndrila's curator insight, March 4, 2015 6:27 AM

Lets hope more people are pulled out of poverty in years to come!

Cass Allan's curator insight, March 5, 2015 7:03 AM

millennium development goals. Positive news

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Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"


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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 2015 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, February 7, 2015 7:51 PM

After studying this comparison tool and using it to find the best of the best and worst of the worst, I picked out some highlights I'd like to share. Monaco is clearly the place to be born, earn, and live. When compared to the USA, the infant mortality rate is 71% less, the life expectancy is 10 years longer @ 84, and you'll earn 62% more money, no doubt because you have ten more years in which to do so. I believe the stats may be skewed a bit in this country comparison as the very rich live there and they have access to the best medical care, and probably don't have very many infants with them when they make the move from elsewhere, hence the low infant mortality rate. Austria is not a bad second choice as you are 33% less likely to be unemployed. On a sobering note, the life expectancy if you live in Namibia is only 52! Yikes, I'm already 53... It's far worse however in Swaziland. The life expectancy is sadly only 50.5 years and you are 44 times more likely to have AIDS than if you lived here. 26.5% of the population has AIDS! Be thankful for where you live and stop complaining, it's far worse on average in nearly all other countries.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 2015 4:59 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home. 


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High Security Borders

High Security Borders | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Accelerated through the fear from the attacks of 9/11 and all what followed, the so called ‘Western Society’ is constructing the greatest wall ever build on this planet. On different building sites on all five inhabitable continents, walls, fences and high-tech border surveillance are under construction in order to secure the citizens and their high quality of life within this system. The fall of the Berlin Wall was described as the historical moment that marks the demolition of world’s last barrier between nation states. Yet it took the European Union only six years to create with the Schengen Agreement in 1995 a new division only 80km offset to the east of Berlin.

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Miles Gibson's curator insight, February 13, 2015 11:04 AM

Unit 4 political geography 

This article explains how the world is filled with division and segregation. Some of the most notable are the walls are the wall in berlin, the wall/border/river/fence between the u.s. and mexico and the border between north and south Korea is the most notable walls.

This article relates to unit 4 because it shows how people, through borders, have divided them through history creating new politics, culture and borders themselves. The political processes involved can change the policies and shapes of nations in the world.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 2015 4:48 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This map shows that hi-tech political surveillance of borders is highly correlated with the core areas of the global economy and some of the most attractive immigrant destinations.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What else do you see in this map?  What does this say about the world order?  Are there patterns that this map reveals/conceals?   


tom cockburn's curator insight, February 27, 2015 5:19 AM

More than simple  'culture clash' or  'politics of fear' etc

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Slavery Footprint

How many slaves work for you? There are 27 million slaves in the world today. Many of them contribute to the supply chains that end up in the products we use every day. Find out how many slaves work for you, and take action.

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Bay of Bengal: depleted fish stocks and huge dead zone signal tipping point

Bay of Bengal: depleted fish stocks and huge dead zone signal tipping point | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Long treated as a bottomless resource pit, economic over-exploitation of the ocean, pollution and rising sea levels are having a catastrophic impact on life in the bay

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major-global-issues-diagram-lg.jpg (1763x1248 pixels)

major-global-issues-diagram-lg.jpg (1763x1248 pixels) | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
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A really useful diagram that shows some of the range of ideas that teaching geogrpahy addresses
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Trying to reduce the Gender gap in Japan

Trying to reduce the Gender gap in Japan | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Japan will never close its gender gap unless it overhauls its whole approach to work and life, explains Yoko Ishikura.

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oyndrila's curator insight, November 27, 2016 3:38 AM
Developed nations are also not doing enough to empower women. Equal opportunities are needed for all.
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What have the millennium development goals achieved?

What have the millennium development goals achieved? | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The UN has called the MDGs ‘the most successful anti-poverty movement in history’, but what progress has been made on each of the goals?

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World Divided Into 4 Regions With The Same GDP

World Divided Into 4 Regions With The Same GDP | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The map above shows the world divided into 4 regions each with the same GDP. World GDP is roughly $75 trillion making each region roughly $18 trillion.
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A different way of looking at the world...
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United Nations declares 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development | World Tourism Organization UNWTO

United Nations declares 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development | World Tourism Organization UNWTO | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
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look out for news and idea around this topic in the next 6 months
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Child mortality over time

Number of children per 1,000 live births who die before reaching the age of 5.

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27 hilariously bad maps that explain nothing

Maps can illuminate our world; they can enlighten us and make us see things differently; they can show how demographics, history, or countless other factors interact with human and physical geography. But, sometimes, maps can be utter disasters, either because they're wrong or simply very dumb. Here are a collection of maps so hilariously bad that you may never trust the form again. Tellingly, the bulk of the collection comes from cable TV news.

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These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa

These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"African countries are also quite diverse from an ethnic standpoint. As the Washington Post's Max Fisher noted back in 2013, the world's 20 most ethnically diverse countries are all African, partially because European colonial powers divvied up sections of the continent with little regard for how the residents would have organized the land themselves. This map above shows Africa's ethnographic regions as identified by George Murdock in his 1959 ethnography of the continent."

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, political, language, ethnicity.


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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:54 AM

Africa is a very diverse and complicated continent due o mistakes made in the Berlin Conference. The strange boundaries drawn restrict these African nations to be one with their own people not with their enemies.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 4:51 PM

We have seen the repercussions of ethnic tensions play out in the Balkans, the Middle East, and even in the United States, and Africa is no exception. Arbitrarily drawn national borders- the remnants of European colonialism- means that there is often significant ethnic diversity within many African nations. Although this creates interesting blends of language and culture, it has often bred violence in many countries, perhaps most notably in South Africa and Rwanda. Although many members of the West like to lump the entire continent into a single category, this could not be further from the truth. The second largest continent with extreme biodiversity, it has bred thousands of languages and hundreds of different cultural backgrounds, sometimes within a single country. It is important for the West to understand the complex make-up of the African continent in order to avoid the Eurocentric assumptions many Westerners make when discussing the continent. There isn't a single "Africa"- there isn't even a single "Nigeria," but rather a multitude of different peoples and cultures, equally as complex as those found in other regions of the world. This map does a very good job at illustrating the complexity and richness of the continent.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:20 AM

People often underestimate how diverse Africa really is. We often have the tendency to lump all Africans together in one large ethnic group. The actual number of different ethnic groups in Africa is rather staggering. This map can also be used as a partial explanation for the amount of ethnic conflict in Africa. Often times, these ethnic groups are squashed together in states with poorly drawn borders. Under that situation, ethnic conflict becomes inevitable.

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The ‘Quiet Chernobyl’: The Aral Sea

The ‘Quiet Chernobyl’: The Aral Sea | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"Prior to the 1960’s, the Aral Sea was the fourth largest lake and approximately the size of Ireland. Fed by both the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers carrying snowmelt from the mountains to the southeast, the Aral Sea moderated the climate and provided a robust fishing industry that straddled the present-day border between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. For the map savvy, that Aral Sea would be almost unrecognizable—it has long appeared as two basins known as the North and the South Aral Sea since the rivers were diverted for crops, leading to the Aral Sea’s alarming shrinkage. Recent NASA satellite imagery shows the decline that the Aral Sea has undergone since 2000, leaving the South Aral Sea completely dried up in 2014. "

 

Tags: podcast, Maps 101, historical, environment, Central Asia, environment modify, Aral Sea.


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Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:49 AM

Both this podcast and its title are very interesting. Describing the Aral Sea crisis as a "Quiet Chernobyl" highlights the seriousness of what has happened to the Aral Sea over the previous decades. Though the Aral Sea was not the site of a catastrophic nuclear meltdown, what has happened there is just as harmful to the environment and the population in the surrounding area. The difference between what happened with the Aral Sea and what happened at Chernobyl, however, is that the Aral Sea crisis was avoidable. Chernobyl was an accident, the Aral Sea was not. The warnings of what was to come were clearly present at the Aral Sea, but they were ignored. 

 

This shows how the balance between man and nature is a precarious one that must be monitored closely and heeded constantly. As an oasis in one of the world's driest deserts, the Aral Sea had vast amounts of potential to help facilitate farming and generally help to make life in the area possible. People saw this potential and made use of it. This was not wrong in and of itself. What was wrong was that this potential was overused, with no regards for the long-term effects that it would have on the ecosystem, the climate, and the way of life in the region. The natural geography of a place is very important and can be used by human beings to achieve great things, but as soon as we stop caring about sustainability and future generations, those tools fail and disappear, causing long-term problems that can never be fixed. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 19, 2015 12:48 PM

The Aral Sea is just one example of an alarming trend happening worldwide, as ill-advised irrigation efforts continue to distort natural geographical formations, climate, and ecosystems. The loss of the Aral is damaging on so many fronts; the loss of an entire ecosystem within its waters, the damages done to the surrounding ecosystems as a result of climate changes and reduction in the food chain directly related to the Sea's disappearance, and the economic repercussions for the people who live in the region. Once a bustling maritime community of trade, the region now lies dormant, the economic realities for the people who once relied on the Sea's waters as dire as the land is dry. Ship hulls line the ground like animal carcasses, the remains of centuries of human life- a stark reminder that man often takes his power too far, too fast. With other large bodies of water facing the same fate in other regions, it is best hoped that the Aral and its ghost crews that now dominate the landscape serve as a reminder to human civilization that, for all our advances, we cannot play "God" and face no consequences. 

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Wideo - Make animated online videos free

Wideo - Make animated online videos free | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Make a video online with wideo! Create professional marketing videos. Try out our video templates. Create explainer videos.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 17, 2015 1:43 AM
Make a video online with wideo! Create professional marketing videos. Try out our video templates. Create explainer videos.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-tools-for-teaching-people-and-learners/?tag=animation


Jarrod Johnson's curator insight, February 17, 2015 4:26 PM

One example of online video creation.

Alison Rostetter's curator insight, February 21, 2015 12:54 PM

I'm always on the lookout for a good, easy-to-use video/animation maker as 'home-made' videos often inject some life into grammar and, when you learn something with pictures, I think it makes the learning more memorable.

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Adventures in Population Growth

Adventures in Population Growth | IB Geography CORE PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"The International Database at the US Census Bureau [provides] population estimates broken down by country, age and year for essentially every country. [With this data we can track] shifts in population makeup over time. I’ve created a few interesting graphs to show the expected shifts over the next 35 years, including the dependency ratio."


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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 5, 2015 8:18 PM

GTAV AC:G Y10 - Geographies of human wellbeing

CD - The reasons for spatial variations between countries in selected indicators of  human wellbeing

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:30 PM

This is an example on the population growth and development from the recent years of technological innovation.

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 2016 8:04 PM

This article has some excellent animated graphs and population pyramids to show some of the demographic changes that countries will be experiencing from now until 2050.  These animated GIFs are perfect teaching images.  


Tag: population, demographic transition model, APHG.