IB Geography (Dip...
Follow
Find
4.7K views | +0 today
IB Geography (Diploma Programme)
Resources for IBDP geography
Curated by Tony Burton
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Tony Burton from Southmoore AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Infographic Of The Day: Are U.S. Cities Like Detroit Really Dying? | Co.Design

Infographic Of The Day: Are U.S. Cities Like Detroit Really Dying? | Co.Design | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Infographic Of The Day: Are U.S. Cities Like Detroit Really Dying?

Via Mr. David Burton
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

Megapolitan areas compete globally

Megapolitan areas compete globally | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
There's a birth of a new geography: "megapolitans," areas that encompass cities and counties linked through man-made and natural connections.

[Article is linked to idea of global hubs, as applied to USA]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

Outside the Neatline: The Impact of High Speed Rail on Accessibility in China

Outside the Neatline: The Impact of High Speed Rail on Accessibility in China | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

Jie Lin, who is a colleague of mine both at the CtSDC and the Department of Geography Ph.D. program, recently examined the impacts of the planned High Speed Rail Network in the People's Republic of China. Specifically, Jie's focus has been on the increase in accessibility that would be a result of implementing the planned high speed network. Before we dive into Jie's results, however, a little background.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

Himalayan glaciers are melting, says IPCC research - Telegraph

Himalayan glaciers are melting, says IPCC research - Telegraph | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
The Himalayan glaciers are melting after all, according to new research
released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

Can Water Dissolve Geo-political Boundaries? Part 1 : NL-Aid

Can Water Dissolve Geo-political Boundaries? Part 1 : NL-Aid | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
NL-Aid is a 'blog and news agency' about foreign aid, development cooperation, international politics in Africa, Asia and Latin America...

It is very clear that we live in a planet where river basins (land drained by rivers and its tributaries, often vast tract of area) and aquifers (deep under-ground layers of water that extend over large areas) that cross over from one country to other and in some cases several countries. Such river basins and aquifers are known as transboundary waters. By 2000 the continent wise transboundary rivers stood at 261 (the number keeps on changing as new states come up with redefining of geo-political boundaries):

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

Meet the food speculators -- New Internationalist

Meet the food speculators -- New Internationalist | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Who is making a profit from food?...

A food speculator bets on the prices of staples such as wheat, soya and oilseed, to make a profit.

Technically speaking, they are investors who trade in ‘agricultural derivatives’ based on ‘futures’ – or agreements to buy or sell foodstuffs at a certain price for delivery at a later date.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Tony Burton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Linguistic diversity dwindling

Linguistic diversity dwindling | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

"80% of all web communication is in ten languages, yet 95% of humanity speaks roughly 300 languages.  Could Apple Siri and Google Voice help save the world's languages?"

 

This graph stunningly displays the result of dwindling linguistic diversity in this era of globalization and technological innovation.  Why have so many languages been dwindling?  Why are an important few growing? What is the future of the majority of the world's languages that have so few native speakers?   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
GIS student's comment, September 18, 2012 10:57 AM
I think there is a lot of emphasis in this article based on help. The only way certain languages are going to survive is if people help promote them. I feel that most Americans are blind to the substantial amount of languages that exist because everywhere we look people are tuning English as there primary language. Global advertisements are commonly seen in English. The Olympics had an incredible amount as well. I think the root of this problem starts with education of new languages, especially in America. Language is definitely something that needs to be embraced especially at a younger age.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

Global Population Density at a Glance (Infographic)

Global Population Density at a Glance (Infographic) | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
This map does a really good job of simply conveying worldwide population density.

And for good reason; it might be the most intuitive look at global pop. density ever cobbled together. The brainchild of Fathom Information Design, 'Dencity' uses small pixels to connote density, big ones to convey wide-open, unpopulated spaces.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

A Cartography of the Anthropocene

A Cartography of the Anthropocene | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

This is a wonderful series of graphics for HL P3 Global interactions.

The anthroposphere is the human layer that grows inside the biosphere.

By locating the structures and hotspots of human activity, by acknowledging the extent of our footprints and our facilities, perhaps we will glimpse the limits of our world and the importance of redefining what it means to live in and on it.

The items on these maps — cities, paved and unpaved roads, railways, power lines, pipelines, cable Internet, airlines, shipping lanes — are obviously not to scale.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

Anatomy of Facebook | Facebook

Anatomy of Facebook | Facebook | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Facebook Data Team wrote a note titled Anatomy of Facebook. Read the full text here.

Despite the title, this article offers lots of interest for geographers, especially those interested in social interactions and global interactions.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

OU on the BBC: Frozen Planet - OpenLearn - Open University

OU on the BBC: Frozen Planet - OpenLearn - Open University | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

Links to posters and information about the Arctic and Antartic.

Includes a fee online course:

Time: 7 hours
Level: IntroductoryThis unit is a general introduction to the frozen planet, including the temperature in the polar regions; the energy from the Sun and the seasons; reading and understanding graphs and maps; and how the Arctic and Antarctic regions are defined.

Suitable for Extreme Environments theme

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

Alarm as corporate giants target developing countries

Alarm as corporate giants target developing countries | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Diabetes, obesity and heart disease rates are soaring in developing countries, as multinationals find new ways of selling processed food to the poor...

Nestle have a floating supermarket on the Amazon River, and other "developments" -

Links to Food and Health option, and to Global Interactions (HL P3)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

Population density in drylands of the World - Maps and Graphics at UNEP/GRID-Arendal

Population density in drylands of the World - Maps and Graphics at UNEP/GRID-Arendal | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Drylands, the arid regions of the World between temperate regions and deserts, are subjects to long seasons with very little precipitation and drought spells sometimes lasting over several years.

Population density in drylands of the World. Drylands, the arid regions of the World between temperate regions and deserts, are subjects to long seasons with very little precipitation and drought spells sometimes lasting over several years. The most densely populated dryland regions are in developing countries, and the economies in this zone are vulnerable to issues like drought.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

The Sun Belt's Migration Comeback | Newgeography.com

The Sun Belt's Migration Comeback | Newgeography.com | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

Along with the oft-pronounced, desperately wished for death of the suburbs, no demographic narrative thrills the mainstream news media more than the decline of the Sun Belt, the country’s southern rim extending from the Carolinas to California. Since the housing bubble collapse in 2007, commentators have heralded “the end of the Sun Belt boom.”

Yet this assertion is largely exaggerated, particularly since the big brass buckle in the middle of the Sun Belt, Texas, has thrived throughout the recession. California, of course, has done far worse, but its slow population growth and harsh regulatory environment align it more with the Northeast than with its sunny neighbors.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Tony Burton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Corruption versus human development

Corruption versus human development | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

Which countries/regions struggle the most with corruption in their political institutions?  Which countries/regions struggle with development?  Why is corruption seem to be correlated with  development? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 4:40 PM

It seems that New Zealand is the country to live in because it has less corruption. But one day the corruption will start and that would be the country no one would like to be living in. the United States is also a great place to live in but in certain areas. That goes for New Zealand also. But what I am curious why in other countries there is so much corruption in all these other countries like Congo and Afghanistan. Maybe that one day will change.

Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

The Geography of Global Brands

The Geography of Global Brands | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Which countries are home to the most valuable names in business?

"Google tops the list of the world’s most valuable brands, besting Microsoft, Walmart and BMW among others. But which countries have the greatest concentrations of the global brands?

Together, my MPI colleagues Charlotta Mellander, Zara Matheson and I coded the list of Global 500 brands by location and charted them by country. The chart below shows the total brand value (in millions of dollars) of the top 25 nations."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

Canada battles to export its oil

Canada battles to export its oil | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Thanks to oil sands Canada now has the world's third largest reserves of oil, but exporting it is not proving easy.

Over the past two decades, changes in technology and the rising cost of oil have left it with so much recoverable oil in the sands, rocks and clay of the province of Alberta that it is now believed to hold the third largest reserves on earth - after Saudi Arabia and Venezuela.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

The Windward Islands: setting the course for fair trade in the banana industry - video

Simon Rawles hears how fair trade rules are helping remaining banana growers in St Lucia, St Vincent, Dominica and Grenada recover from a hurricane that devastated crops in 2010...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Tony Burton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

2011 UN Human Development Report

2011 UN Human Development Report | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
The Human Development Report (HDR) was first launched in 1990 with the single goal of putting people back at the center of the development process in terms of economic debate, policy and advocacy.

 

With a host of links that connect you to videos, charts, statistics about both the present and projections into that future, this is a fantastic resource for any lesson on development. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, December 3, 2011 8:39 AM
Thanks for recooping the link...I think this one will be incredibly valuable.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

2011 Tied For 10th Hottest Year On Record, U.N. Tells Small Islands 'Fuggedaboutit': Gothamist

2011 Tied For 10th Hottest Year On Record, U.N. Tells Small Islands 'Fuggedaboutit': Gothamist | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

2011 is already tied for the 10th warmest year on Earth since record-keeping began in 1850, according to the United Nations' World Meteorological Organization. Yesterday was also the warmest day ever in NYC, with the mercury hitting 70 degrees in Central Park, breaking the previous high of 69 degrees, which happened in 1990. (Before that, the high of 69, dude, had only been reached in 1896.) The 13 hottest years in modern civilization's history have all have occurred in the last 15 years, or at least that's what secular "scientists" would have you believe, with their precious "facts."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

International financial flows: how do Mexican migrants send remittances back home? | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico

International financial flows: how do Mexican migrants send remittances back home? | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Remittance payments are one of the world’s major international financial flows.

Mexican migrants in the USA send more than 20 billion dollars a year in total back to their families and friends. But how exactly are remittance payments made?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

First Time in Spain\'s History: More People Leaving Country - Hispanically Speaking News

First Time in Spain\'s History: More People Leaving Country  - Hispanically Speaking News | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

The economic crisis that broke out in 2008 will result in a net outflow of people from Spain seeking work, the first time since figures have been kept...

In 2011, forecasts are for 450,000 people to come to Spain - with 351,588 of that predicted number having already arrived by September - compared with 580,850 who will leave the country (407,214 by September) seeking better economic opportunities, thus creating a net emigration of 130,850 people.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

USGS - Forecasting California's Earthquakes--What Can We Expect in the Next 30 Years?

USGS - Forecasting California's Earthquakes--What Can We Expect in the Next 30 Years? | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

In a new comprehensive study, scientists have determined that the chance of having one or more magnitude 6.7 or larger earthquakes in the California area over the next 30 years is greater than 99%.

Such quakes can be deadly, as shown by the 1989 magnitude 6.9 Loma Prieta and the 1994 magnitude 6.7 Northridge earthquakes. The likelihood of at least one even more powerful quake of magnitude 7.5 or greater in the next 30 years is 46%—such a quake is most likely to occur in the southern half of the State.

Building codes, earthquake insurance, and emergency planning will be affected by these new results, which highlight the urgency to prepare now for the powerful quakes that are inevitable in California’s future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

radicalcartography

WORLD CROPLAND

by Bill Rankin, 2009- Interactive map of how the world's cultivated area has expanded since 1700.

"The spread of agriculture over the last 300 years has been a dance of intensification and expansion. Nearly every area of the world has seen agriculture become more locally dense: agricultural land has become more and more agricultural, even in areas where it has been long established and where population density has..."

Radical Cartography, brought to you by Bill Rankin...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tony Burton
Scoop.it!

The Atlas of Aspirational Origins

The Atlas of Aspirational Origins | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

Interesting article that links to the geography and globalization of food:

 

"Provenance is a tricky issue. Over the past few years, the names of agricultural regions, villages, and even specific farms have proliferated on urban menus and shelf labels, providing the aspirational consumer with a shorthand guarantee of authenticity, taste, and, often, local origin..." (cont)

more...
No comment yet.