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IB Geography (Diploma Programme)
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Geographic Travels: Geo-Literacy: Videos by National Geographic and Geographic Travels

Geographic Travels: Geo-Literacy: Videos by National Geographic and Geographic Travels | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

Why geography matters, by one of my all-time favorite geography bloggers - from buying a house to resource exploration to marketing and everything in between.

Use this geo-literacy video entitled "I'm a Geographer, Hire Me" ton convince any doubting students, parents or administrators.

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Troubled Waters [short video from Univ. of Texas at Austin)

Troubled Waters [short video from Univ. of Texas at Austin) | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

Everyone knows water is scarce in deserts. In Northern Mexico, the expansion of commercial dairy farming appears to be having serious adverse impacts on the endemic flora and fauns of the Cuatro Ciénegas area. This  area's biodiversity is so great that is often spoken of as Mexico's "Galapagos".

Dairy farming or rare plants and animals? ~ that is the question...

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Exclusive Interview: Why Tar Sands Oil Is More Polluting and Why It Matters | InsideClimate News

Exclusive Interview: Why Tar Sands Oil Is More Polluting and Why It Matters | InsideClimate News | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

Adam Brandt, global expert on the carbon footprint of fuels, explains why oil sands' 20% greater greenhouse gas emissions are significant.


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Yale Environment 360: Rivers are Largest Source Of Mercury in Arctic Ocean, Study Says

A new study suggests that rivers may be funneling far more toxic mercury into the Arctic Ocean than previously believed, a finding that may portend even greater mercury concentrations in the future as the effects of climate change accelerate the region’s hydrological cycle.

Despite the Arctic's remoteness, scientists have long known that mercury levels in Arctic mammals are among the highest on the planet, a factor largely attributed to mercury being deposited in the Arctic Ocean from the air. But according to Harvard scientists, circumpolar rivers — particularly three great Siberian rivers, the Lena, Ob, and Yenisei — may be contributing twice as much mercury as the atmosphere.

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Apocalypse Soon: Has Civilization Passed the Environmental Point of No Return?

Apocalypse Soon: Has Civilization Passed the Environmental Point of No Return? | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Although there is an urban legend that the world will end this year based on a misinterpretation of the Mayan calendar, some researchers think a 40-year-old computer program that predicts a collapse of socioeconomic order and massive drop in human...

Via Cathryn Wellner
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LAOS: Aiming to leave least developed country list

LAOS: Aiming to leave least developed country list | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

The government of Laos has taken the unique step of stating its ambition to graduate from the UN list of Least Developed Countries (LDC) by 2020.


Via Paola Rattu
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Shell Oil - The Awful Truth

This satire provide a critique of the political, economic and environmental actions of Shell oil in the Niger Delta region.  The biting commentary highlights the obvious lies that have been told by Shell over the years while their company has been ravaging the Niger Delta. 


Via John Peterson, Seth Dixon
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The growth and expansion of Wal-Mart in Mexico | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico

The growth and expansion of Wal-Mart in Mexico | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

Much recent attention in the USA and Mexico has focused on the allegations of bribery related to Wal-Mart de México. 

This article looks at the diffusion of Wal-Mart stores across Mexico.

Recent news reports allege that this aggressive growth may have been facilitated by payments of bribes to expedite construction permits. As of March 2012, Walmex was operating no fewer than 2,106 retail units throughout Mexico. They include 127 Sam’s Clubs, 213 Walmart Supercenters, 94 Suburbias, 385 Bodega Aurreras, 88 Superamas, 358 VIPS and El Portón restaurants, and over 840 Bodega Aurrera Expresses and other small outlets.

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How long will Mexico’s oil reserves last? | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico

How long will Mexico’s oil reserves last? | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

Mexico’s 3P (proven, probable and possible) reserves remained unchanged last year (2011) as new discoveries, mainly in the Chicontepec field, offset oil extraction.

The Chicontepec field alone holds about 17,000 million barrels of oil equivalent (BOE), almost 40% of Mexico’s total 3P reserves of more than 43 million BOE (see graph). Mexico’s total 3P reserves are sufficient for about 32 years at current rates of extraction.

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1964 Mexican postage stamp features unusual map projection | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico

1964 Mexican postage stamp features unusual map projection | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
One of the more beautiful, unusual and useful map projections ever devised was created by cartographer Bernard Cahill.
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China's One-Child Policy

China's One-Child Policy | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Yuanyuan Kelly's curator insight, March 4, 2013 9:27 AM

A really cool infograph regarding China's one child policy!

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:26 PM

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:04 PM

Very simple and easy to interpret graph on the One child policy in China. When thinking about the "has it been successful" section I was troubled. Yes the government came close to its goal of 1.2 Billion but do so they prevented 400 million births. So its successful because they almost hit the mark but at what costs? Natal policies can leave countries without enough people to repopulate the workforce, we have to keep this in mind. Controlling population is a dangerous project.. 

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Melting Sea Ice Could Lead To Pressure on Arctic Fishery by Ed Struzik: Yale Environment 360

Melting Sea Ice Could Lead To Pressure on Arctic Fishery by Ed Struzik: Yale Environment 360 | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
With melting sea ice opening up previously inaccessible parts of the Arctic Ocean, the fishing industry sees a potential bonanza.

But some scientists and government officials have begun calling for a moratorium on fishing in the region until the true state of the Arctic fishery is assessed.

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$1 billion 'ghost town' to be built in New Mexico - Telegraph

$1 billion 'ghost town' to be built in New Mexico  - Telegraph | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
A $1 billion (£620 million) 'ghost town' is to be built in the United States in the name of scientific research.
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Crystal Composition Could Predict Volcanic Eruptions - Science News - redOrbit

Crystal Composition Could Predict Volcanic Eruptions - Science News - redOrbit | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
By studying crystals formed in volcanic rock, experts may be able to predict an impending eruption up to a year in advance, researchers from the University of Bristol have discovered.
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Yale Environment 360: Water Depletion Threatens Future U.S. Food Supplies, Study Says

The rapid depletion of groundwater resources in key U.S. agricultural regions could portend future vulnerabilities in growing the nation’s food, according to a new study. In an assessment of water supplies in California’s Central Valley and the High Plains of the central U.S. — which runs from northwest Texas to southern Wyoming and South Dakota — University of Texas researchers found that in many places water is being used faster than it can be replenished, and that some regions may be unfit for agriculture within decades.

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Yale Environment 360: Papuans Paid a Pittance For Palm Oil Land, Investigation Says

Yale Environment 360: Papuans Paid a Pittance For Palm Oil Land, Investigation Says | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

A major palm oil company has paid indigenous residents of Indonesian Papua $0.65 per hectare for forested land that will be worth $5,000 a hectare once cultivated, according to a report by the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA). The EIA said that Moi indigenous landowners agreed to the land sale — at a price 7,000 times less than the land will eventually be worth.

The clearing of Indonesia’s rain forest for palm oil plantations is having profound effects — threatening endangered species, upending the lives of indigenous people, and releasing massive amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, Tom Knudson writes.

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Yale Environment 360: Seagrasses Hold More Carbon Per Square Kilometer Than Forests

The planet’s seagrass meadows store more than twice as much carbon per square kilometer as forests, demonstrating that coastal vegetation can play an important role in mitigating climate change, a new study says. Writing in the journal Nature Geoscience, a team of scientists calculated that coastal seagrass beds can store up to 83,000 metric tons of carbon per square kilometer, compared with 30,000 metric tons of carbon per square kilometer in typical forests...

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Prestige oil spill - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Prestige oil spill - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

Good example of recent "technological" hazard event.

The Prestige oil spill was an oil spill off the coast of Galicia caused by the sinking of an oil tanker in 2002. The spill polluted thousands of kilometers of coastline and more than one thousand beaches on the Spanish, French and Portuguese coast, as well as causing great harm to the local fishing industry. The spill is the largest environmental disaster of both Spain's history and Portugal's history.

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Why You Should Eat Local Food (Even if You Don’t Care About Food Miles)

Why You Should Eat Local Food (Even if You Don’t Care About Food Miles) | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

I really like this article because it seems almost more personal. Obviously the global effects of shipping food, such as pollution, are all many can talk about when arguing to eat locally. However I find that most people are out of sight out of mind kind of people and won't necessarily consider these risks important because they are not immediately affected. This article however makes some of the more personal, individual arguments for eating locally such as knowing what your local foods look like or how your surroundings look.


Via Steph Dion, Seth Dixon
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Hurricane names and forecast for 2012 | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico

The 2012 hurricane season is underway.

The “official” hurricane season is from 15 May to 30 November each year for Pacific coast storms, and from 1 June to 30 November for Atlantic storms, though most hurricane activity is concentrated in the months from July to September. Hurricanes are also known as typhoons or tropical cyclones...

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How much drugs money is laundered in Mexico each year? | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico

Despite this being an obvious question, there is no simple or generally accepted answer!

According to Mexico’s tax authorities (SHCP), the nation’s financial system “gained” at least 10 billion dollars last year from unrecorded, presumably illicit, activities such as drug trafficking. North of the border, the US State Department believes that money laundering in Mexico accounts for between 8 billion and 25 billion dollars a year, while figures as high as 29 billion dollars have been offered in the US Congress.

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How fast is the ground sinking in Mexico City and what can be done about it? | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico

A recent report from researchers at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) and the Metropolitan Autonomous University (UAM) confirms that the height of the water table below Mexico City is dropping by about one meter a year, as more water is pumped out of the aquifer than the natural replenishment rate from rainfall.

About 60% of Mexico City’s drinking water comes from wells, with the remainder piped into the city, mainly via the Cutzamala system. The researchers say that up to 65% more water is taken from some parts of the Mexico City aquifer than the amount replaced each year by natural recharge.

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Pollution and the Effects On Unregulated Regions

There are many pollutants that are being produced and discarded on a daily basis. However, are these pollutants being properly disposed of?

 


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Google’s Amazon Rainforest Street View Is Ready For You To Explore

Google’s Amazon Rainforest Street View Is Ready For You To Explore | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

"Back in August, Google announced that it was teaming up with nonprofit Foundation for a Sustainable Amazon to map a small section of the massive Rio Negro river (tributary of the Amazon) near Manaus."  Virtual field trip, here we come!


Via Kevreadenn, Lindsay Coogan, Seth Dixon
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One Country’s Table Scraps, Another Country’s Meal

One Country’s Table Scraps, Another Country’s Meal | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Food riots are breaking out abroad but Americans toss a lot of their food in the garbage.

 

What do you consider "garbage" when it comes to food? Take a look at what the average American family wastes each month, and think about where that food could have gone.


Via Dale Fraza, Seth Dixon
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