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One billion slum dwellers

One billion slum dwellers | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
One billion people worldwide live in slums, a number that will likely double by 2030. The characteristics of slum life vary greatly between geographic regions, but they are generally inhabited by the very poor or socially disadvantaged.

 

There was significant publicity last year when the world population reached 7 billion.  Barely a whisper was heard when the global population of slum dwellers exceeded 1 billion.  When the world's population reached 7 billion, it was used as a moment to reflect on sustainable growth, resources and the common good for humanity.  This 'milestone' of 1 billion slum dwellers needs to also serve as a teaching moment to reflect on urbanization, migration, human development and the underlying causes that have lead to this explosive growth primarily in the developing world. 


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Nasry Says Hi's curator insight, January 17, 7:49 AM

So, by 2030, its likely that there will be 2 billion people living in slums.

 

Wonderful.

 

What I find most peculiar is, that no matter how much the first world nations insinuate that they are doing their best to solve the problem, work together to end world hunger, blah blah blah. The fact is, according to a video I recently watched, that no matter how much money in alms are given to those in poverty, the country will almost always include taxes, pay deductions, etcetera, and this amount is more than the amount that they had given to them. So technically, the situation is getting worse.

 

Fantastic.

 

I understand that money is a sensitive matter, but really, if you think about it, the government of poorer countries would be overrun by corruption. All because the richer nations care about making money and put that priority over everything else. And here in the fourth richest nation in the world (as of now), our ministers are getting paid hundreds of thousands of dollars monthly to prevent corruption, but we're still rolling in seas of money.So why not help these less privileged countries?

 

I can think of only one reason, and that reason i have mentioned earlier: Corruption. We might be donating to the people of a country, but before that money goes to the people, it would have to go through the government. And there it begins. Say we donate 2 Million Dollars. A lot of money, right? Well, say that Country X has a hundred members of parliament. And to shut everyone up, everyone gets ten thousand dollars. Common sense tells us that they will not get the full amount. Count the authorities the money has to pass through, how many hands the money has exchanged with, the number of pockets that amount of money has filled, and you get only a fraction of what we gave. Considering Country X is a fairly large country, the amount of money will get further divided and the people will only get probably a millionth of what they were supposed to get.

 

Now I have lived in Singapore all my life, and I know I am not in the right position to say this, because i probably will never know how the poorest of the poor survive. But I'm gonna say it anyway.

 

WHY SO MATERIALISTIC???????

 

The money you have is only temporary. Its just a piece of paper. If you have been corrupted, please stop. Because the poorest people in your country are probably farmers. And farmers make food. More money for them,  more incentive for them to work. More work done, more food you get. The more food you get, the less starved you are, the better your country will improve, and eventually, Country X could be a powerful nation.

 

Singapore is a perfect example. Back when it gained independence in 1965, the entire country was practically a slum. But now, less then half a century later, we are now the fourth richest nation in the world.

 

And for the record, I have no idea why I sounded so angry at the beginning.

 

Sean Lim Lin Yuan's comment, January 27, 11:15 PM
Hi wow
Jung Dohun's comment, January 27, 11:43 PM
It is not so easy as you think. There are many countries that does not have land suitable for farming. Also, farming requires water and many countries does not even have water for people to drink. If it was so easy for a country to be wealthy, there might not even be a poor country at all. There must be a good reason behind it and we, for now should not interfere. At most we can do is to donate :)
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Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables

Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Tony Burton's insight:

Insightful and at times very disturbing account of the tough lives led by Mexican farmhands working for major growers. An excellent starting point for lots of discussions!

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Stop Trying to Save the World

Stop Trying to Save the World | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Big ideas are destroying international development.
Tony Burton's insight:

Why "International Development" needs a rethink.

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Tony Hall's curator insight, November 25, 9:13 AM

This is really interesting article. It would seem that international aid is similar to education in that it is trying to find the 'one big idea' that will solve everything. It's just not going to happen like that. People don't need to think outside the box so much as work with what is in the box already. The big dreams are important as an ultimate goal, but we need to understand that to reach that ultimate goal is going to take time. And that's ok as long as there work being done to get there.

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Global Fishing Watch

Global Fishing Watch | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Technology Illuminating the World’s Fishing Fleet

Global Fishing Watch is a technology platform that uses satellite data to inform the public about overfishing and make global fishing activity more transparent.

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The Drinkable Book - Water is Life - YouTube

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New Analysis Shows Global Exposure to Sea Level Rise | Climate Central

New Analysis Shows Global Exposure to Sea Level Rise | Climate Central | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Explore our new analysis of worldwide exposure to sea level rise & coastal flooding, complete with an interactive graphic via NYT.
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World population to hit 11bn in 2100 – with 70% chance of continuous rise

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A New Frontier for Fracking: Drilling Near the Arctic Circle by Ed Struzik: Yale Environment 360

A New Frontier for Fracking: Drilling Near the Arctic Circle by Ed Struzik: Yale Environment 360 | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
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Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World - GIS Lounge

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World - GIS Lounge | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
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Why Restoring Wetlands Is More Critical Than Ever by Bruce Stutz: Yale Environment 360

Why Restoring Wetlands Is More Critical Than Ever by Bruce Stutz: Yale Environment 360 | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Along the Delaware River estuary, efforts are underway to restore wetlands lost due to centuries of human activity. With sea levels rising, coastal communities there and and elsewhere in the U.S. and Europe are realizing the value of wetlands as important buffers against flooding and tidal surges.
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Scientists Look for Causes of Baffling Die-Off of Sea Stars by Eric Wagner: Yale Environment 360

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Loss of Snowpack and Glaciers In Rockies Poses Water Threat by Ed Struzik: Yale Environment 360

Loss of Snowpack and Glaciers In Rockies Poses Water Threat by Ed Struzik: Yale Environment 360 | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
From the Columbia River basin in the U.S. to the Prairie Provinces of Canada, scientists and policy makers are confronting a future in which the loss of snow and ice in the Rocky Mountains could imperil water supplies for agriculture, cities and towns, and hydropower production.
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Water supply key to outcome of conflicts in Iraq and Syria, experts warn

Water supply key to outcome of conflicts in Iraq and Syria, experts warn | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Security analysts in London and Baghdad say control of rivers and dams has become a major tactical weapon for Isis
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Carbon emissions: past, present and future – interactive

Carbon emissions: past, present and future – interactive | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
As the UN climate talks open in Lima to agree on a draft text for a binding treaty in Paris in 2015, here is a timeline of world’s top 20 emitters of carbon dioxide since the dawn of industrialisation
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NASA found a way to visualize the most important process behind global warming

NASA found a way to visualize the most important process behind global warming | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
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Drive to Mine the Deep Sea Raises Concerns Over Impacts by Mike Ives: Yale Environment 360

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Network Inclusion Round Table 2014: Geographies of Information Inequality in Sub-Saharan Africa

Network Inclusion Round Table 2014: Geographies of Information Inequality in Sub-Saharan Africa | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
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Wooden skyscrapers could be the future of flat-pack cities around the world

Wooden skyscrapers could be the future of flat-pack cities around the world | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
The development of engineered timber could herald a new era of eco-friendly ‘plyscrapers’. Christchurch welcomed its first multistorey timber structure this year, there are plans for Vancouver, and the talk is China could follow
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Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country

Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
A new analysis of sea levels and flood risk around the world offers more evidence that the brunt of climate change will not be borne equally.
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Solar plants causing birds to catch on fire in mid-flight

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As Small Hydropower Expands, So Does Caution on Its Impacts by Dave Levitan: Yale Environment 360

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Qatar World Cup: migrants wait a year to be paid for building offices

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Climate Change Isn’t Main Culprit in Decline of Coral Reefs: Report

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