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Gender Gap Index

Gender Gap Index | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

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Linda Denty's curator insight, October 28, 2013 6:06 PM

Interesting data!

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:35 PM

No surprise here that the countries that are more well off generally have less of a gender gap. One thing that i like to point out about this article is that the united states came in 23rd which i think is pretty humerous since we pride outselfs on our rights and equality but were not even in the top 20 countries in the world when it comes down to equality between genders. The biggest surprise of this article though has to be nicaragua coming in 10th even though every country around it scored poorly. hopefully the nicaraguans can teach their fellow costa ricans and houndurans how to close the gap.

xavia's comment, April 10, 12:38 AM
gender gap chloropleth
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Pass the Books. Hold the Oil.

Pass the Books. Hold the Oil. | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Education is a better economic driver than a country’s natural resources.

 

This NY Times article is compelling fodder for a discussion on economic development.  While having natural resources on the surface sounds like the best valuable asset for a nation economy, why does Friedman argue that an abundance of natural resource can hurt the national economy?  While an educated workforce is obviously an asset, just how important is it compared to other factors? 


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One billion slum dwellers

One billion slum dwellers | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
One billion people worldwide live in slums, a number that will likely double by 2030. The characteristics of slum life vary greatly between geographic regions, but they are generally inhabited by the very poor or socially disadvantaged.

 

There was significant publicity last year when the world population reached 7 billion.  Barely a whisper was heard when the global population of slum dwellers exceeded 1 billion.  When the world's population reached 7 billion, it was used as a moment to reflect on sustainable growth, resources and the common good for humanity.  This 'milestone' of 1 billion slum dwellers needs to also serve as a teaching moment to reflect on urbanization, migration, human development and the underlying causes that have lead to this explosive growth primarily in the developing world. 


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Nasry Says Hi's curator insight, January 17, 7:49 AM

So, by 2030, its likely that there will be 2 billion people living in slums.

 

Wonderful.

 

What I find most peculiar is, that no matter how much the first world nations insinuate that they are doing their best to solve the problem, work together to end world hunger, blah blah blah. The fact is, according to a video I recently watched, that no matter how much money in alms are given to those in poverty, the country will almost always include taxes, pay deductions, etcetera, and this amount is more than the amount that they had given to them. So technically, the situation is getting worse.

 

Fantastic.

 

I understand that money is a sensitive matter, but really, if you think about it, the government of poorer countries would be overrun by corruption. All because the richer nations care about making money and put that priority over everything else. And here in the fourth richest nation in the world (as of now), our ministers are getting paid hundreds of thousands of dollars monthly to prevent corruption, but we're still rolling in seas of money.So why not help these less privileged countries?

 

I can think of only one reason, and that reason i have mentioned earlier: Corruption. We might be donating to the people of a country, but before that money goes to the people, it would have to go through the government. And there it begins. Say we donate 2 Million Dollars. A lot of money, right? Well, say that Country X has a hundred members of parliament. And to shut everyone up, everyone gets ten thousand dollars. Common sense tells us that they will not get the full amount. Count the authorities the money has to pass through, how many hands the money has exchanged with, the number of pockets that amount of money has filled, and you get only a fraction of what we gave. Considering Country X is a fairly large country, the amount of money will get further divided and the people will only get probably a millionth of what they were supposed to get.

 

Now I have lived in Singapore all my life, and I know I am not in the right position to say this, because i probably will never know how the poorest of the poor survive. But I'm gonna say it anyway.

 

WHY SO MATERIALISTIC???????

 

The money you have is only temporary. Its just a piece of paper. If you have been corrupted, please stop. Because the poorest people in your country are probably farmers. And farmers make food. More money for them,  more incentive for them to work. More work done, more food you get. The more food you get, the less starved you are, the better your country will improve, and eventually, Country X could be a powerful nation.

 

Singapore is a perfect example. Back when it gained independence in 1965, the entire country was practically a slum. But now, less then half a century later, we are now the fourth richest nation in the world.

 

And for the record, I have no idea why I sounded so angry at the beginning.

 

Sean Lim Lin Yuan's comment, January 27, 11:15 PM
Hi wow
Jung Dohun's comment, January 27, 11:43 PM
It is not so easy as you think. There are many countries that does not have land suitable for farming. Also, farming requires water and many countries does not even have water for people to drink. If it was so easy for a country to be wealthy, there might not even be a poor country at all. There must be a good reason behind it and we, for now should not interfere. At most we can do is to donate :)
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Why reconstructing Haiti has been so slow

Why reconstructing Haiti has been so slow | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Experts and aid officials discuss ongoing challenges and lessons learnt on the ground in Haiti...

 

Development and humanitarian aid projects must always take local geographic factors into consideration when devising any plan for the future.  Political uncertainty, poor transportation infrastructure, disease and not enough locally based programs are but a few of the issues that continue to plague the communities in Haiti. 


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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 13, 7:06 PM

Haiti is in a prime "natural disaster" zone and it is difficult for a country to recover fully after each "hit".  Disaster after disaster begins to weigh heavily on an already struggling infrastructure, government, and hope.  The earthquake that Haiti experienced in 2009 was particularly devastating.  This article aims to shed some light on a few of the reasons why, two years later, Haiti was in pretty much the same condition.  Haiti's government was basically non-existent before this earthquake, and anything that did exist was quite ineffective at making decisions.  Bureaucratic procedures made incoming aid and their supplies move into Haiti extremely slow.  Some of it stopped coming altogether when cholera began to make a huge presence within the population.  As seen with this situation, as well as in other countries, uncoordinated aid and conflicting agendas of different organizations can do more harm than good.  Also, urban settings are extremely complex and can be puzzling to an outsider, particularly in times of desperate need.  When rebuilding, it is important to consider the future in terms of what else nature and location has in store for them.

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Why Invest in Women?

Why Invest in Women? | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

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2011 UN Human Development Report

2011 UN Human Development Report | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
The Human Development Report (HDR) was first launched in 1990 with the single goal of putting people back at the center of the development process in terms of economic debate, policy and advocacy.

 

With a host of links that connect you to videos, charts, statistics about both the present and projections into that future, this is a fantastic resource for any lesson on development. 


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Seth Dixon's comment, December 3, 2011 8:39 AM
Thanks for recooping the link...I think this one will be incredibly valuable.
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Stop Calling Them 'Developed Countries'

Stop Calling Them 'Developed Countries' | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

This particular graph shows Total Fertility (x axis) and Life Expectancy (y axis) which collectively can explain some of what can be called human development.  This is an interactive graphic that shows both temporal and regional patterns in changes in development. 


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Seth Dixon's comment, April 24, 2012 8:26 PM
Absolutely...the changes in life expectancy show that for the lower classes especially, life in a 'less' developed country today is better than life in many of the developed countries hundreds of years ago.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 17, 2013 9:14 AM

This particular graph shows Total Fertility (x axis) and Life Expectancy (y axis) which collectively can explain some of what can be called human development.  This is an interactive graphic that shows both temporal and regional patterns in changes in development.

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 25, 2013 11:02 PM

A Chapter 2 video to view!

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MDG drinking water target being met is cause for celebration

MDG drinking water target being met is cause for celebration | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Sanjay Wijesekera: This achievement shows that where there is a will, it is possible to truly transform the lives of hundreds of millions of people for the better.

 

The MDG (Millennial Development Goal) to cut the global population that does not have access to clean drinking water was cut in half, and five years ahead of schedule. The World Health Organization and the United Nations are very pleased with this achievement, but it is a timely reminder of the developmental problems of poverty and access that still exist. For example, 783 million people still do not have access to clean drinking water.  3,000 children die each day from diarrheal diseases (usually from bad drinking water and poor sanitation). Although some success should be celebrated, the world, in the currently constituted social, economic and political framework, still does not provide the most basic of requirements for a sizeable portion of humanity.


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World Bank eAtlas of Global Development

"The World Bank eAtlas of Global Development maps and graphs more than 175 thematically organized indicators for over 200 countries, letting you visualize and compare progress on the most important development challenges facing our world. Most indicators cover several decades, so you can see, for example, how 'life expectancy at birth' has improved from 1960 up through the latest year."  This tool should greatly enhance student projects as they will add more data, and see bigger patterns.  To go to the link visit: http://www.app.collinsindicate.com/worldbankatlas-global/en


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Why reconstructing Haiti has been so slow

Why reconstructing Haiti has been so slow | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
Experts and aid officials discuss ongoing challenges and lessons learnt on the ground in Haiti...

 

Development and humanitarian aid projects must always take local geographic factors into consideration when devising any plan for the future.  Political uncertainty, poor transportation infrastructure, disease and not enough locally based programs are but a few of the issues that continue to plague the communities in Haiti. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Paige Therien's curator insight, February 13, 7:06 PM

Haiti is in a prime "natural disaster" zone and it is difficult for a country to recover fully after each "hit".  Disaster after disaster begins to weigh heavily on an already struggling infrastructure, government, and hope.  The earthquake that Haiti experienced in 2009 was particularly devastating.  This article aims to shed some light on a few of the reasons why, two years later, Haiti was in pretty much the same condition.  Haiti's government was basically non-existent before this earthquake, and anything that did exist was quite ineffective at making decisions.  Bureaucratic procedures made incoming aid and their supplies move into Haiti extremely slow.  Some of it stopped coming altogether when cholera began to make a huge presence within the population.  As seen with this situation, as well as in other countries, uncoordinated aid and conflicting agendas of different organizations can do more harm than good.  Also, urban settings are extremely complex and can be puzzling to an outsider, particularly in times of desperate need.  When rebuilding, it is important to consider the future in terms of what else nature and location has in store for them.

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Corruption versus human development

Corruption versus human development | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it

Which countries/regions struggle the most with corruption in their political institutions?  Which countries/regions struggle with development?  Why is corruption seem to be correlated with  development? 


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 4:40 PM

It seems that New Zealand is the country to live in because it has less corruption. But one day the corruption will start and that would be the country no one would like to be living in. the United States is also a great place to live in but in certain areas. That goes for New Zealand also. But what I am curious why in other countries there is so much corruption in all these other countries like Congo and Afghanistan. Maybe that one day will change.