IB Geography (Diploma Programme)
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Resources for IBDP geography
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Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach

Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
This website serves as an off-campus host for text, images, data and other web-based resources associated with the free eText, Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2015 4:58 PM

I'm very excited to see a free eText in Human Geography.  I will be looking at this more closely during the next semester and think that geography teachers will see this as a welcome supplemental to their arsenal of resources. This is definitely on the shortlist of best materials on this site.   


Tags: geography educationAPHG, textbook.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, August 13, 2015 7:24 AM

Human Geography

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 13, 2015 8:52 AM

Gracias a Seth Dixon accedo a este texto de acceso libre que es una interesante Introducción a la Geografía Humana. De fácil navegación se puede acceder a valiosa información textual, a imágenes, datos y otros recursos. Es un producto de Steven Graves, profesor de geografía en California State University, Northridge.

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Big U.S. Cities Growing Faster than Suburbs

Big U.S. Cities Growing Faster than Suburbs | IB Geography (Diploma Programme) | Scoop.it
For the first time in a century, most of America's largest cities are growing at a faster rate than their surrounding suburbs.

 

"As young adults seeking a foothold in the weak job market shun home-buying and stay put in bustling urban centers," this profoundly is changing the demographic processes that create our major urban areas.  "Driving the resurgence are young adults, who are delaying careers, marriage and having children amid persistently high unemployment. Burdened with college debt or toiling in temporary, lower-wage positions, they are spurning homeownership in the suburbs for shorter-term, no-strings-attached apartment living, public transit and proximity to potential jobs in larger cities."  With home ownership no longer the goal and the suburbs the destination of choice, how with this affect the urban structure of or major metropolitan areas? 


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Kim Vignale's comment, July 30, 2012 10:33 PM
It is logical for many single people to live in urban areas due to job availability, convenience of location, and small affordable apartments. Established families resides in suburban areas because houses are bigger and land is vast for young children to grow up in. However, a typical college graduate would find it difficult to find employment right after college; once employed, wages are not high enough for these young adults to buy a house. I would find it more convenient to live in the city because public transportation is available and more jobs are offered in large cities. Once i get established with a career, it would be more logical to buy a house in the suburbs.
Seth Dixon's comment, August 2, 2012 2:39 PM
It is a logical shift in urban processes, especially when you consider that in the United States, fewer and fewer people are 1) getting married young and 2) having children. Both of these makes the suburbs less of an ideal spot young Americans that are leaving college and their parents homes.