IB Biology in the news
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IB Biology in the news
Articles related to the IB Biology syllabus.
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Microbes 'cheaper, fairer' for boosting yields than GM

Microbes 'cheaper, fairer' for boosting yields than GM | IB Biology in the news | Scoop.it
Microbes could boost crop yields and reduce the need for fertilisers at lower cost than GM crops, says an expert.
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Case studies: A hard look at GM crops

Case studies: A hard look at GM crops | IB Biology in the news | Scoop.it
Superweeds? Suicides? Stealthy genes? The true, the false and the still unknown about transgenic crops.
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DNA pioneer James Watson reveals helix story was almost never told

DNA pioneer James Watson reveals helix story was almost never told | IB Biology in the news | Scoop.it
The Double Helix's tale of DNA breakthrough became a big hit but had to overcome hostility from the Nobel winner's colleagues
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Storing Digital Data in DNA

Storing Digital Data in DNA | IB Biology in the news | Scoop.it
Scientists have stored audio and text on fragments of DNA and then retrieved them with near-perfect fidelity—a technique that one day may provide a new way to handle the overwhelming data of the digital age.
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How Brainless Slime Molds Redefine Intelligence [Video]: Scientific American

How Brainless Slime Molds Redefine Intelligence [Video]: Scientific American | IB Biology in the news | Scoop.it
Single-celled amoebae can remember, make decisions and anticipate change, urging scientists to rethink intelligent behavior
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Genetically modified purple tomato 'tastier than normal varieties'

Genetically modified purple tomato 'tastier than normal varieties' | IB Biology in the news | Scoop.it

A genetically modified purple tomato that is tastier than normal varieties and can last for more than a month before going off has been invented by scientists. The GM tomato, which gains its unusual color from a natural pigment known as anthocyanin, could be picked and shipped later due to its longer shelf life, allowing more time for flavour to develop on the vine.

 

Tests showed the shelf life of the tomatoes more than doubled from an average of 21 to 48 days after genetic modification, and they were less likely to go mouldy after harvest.

 

The strain has also been found in earlier studies to fight cancer in mice due to its high levels of antioxidants, and scientists say its qualities could be replicated in other soft fruits like strawberries and raspberries.

 

The tomatoes were modified by scientists at the John Innes Centre in Norfolk to contain two genes from the snapdragon which “switch on” a set of dormant genes in the tomato, causing them to produce more anthocyanin.

 

The pigment occurs naturally in various plants and flowers, and is responsible for many of the blues, reds and purples seen in nature, but also ramps up levels of antioxidants.

The goal of the project was to produce fruit with higher antioxidant levels which could benefit health, and earlier studies have shown that they helped extend the lives of cancer-prone mice by 30 per cent.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Obituary: Francis Crick

BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Obituary: Francis Crick | IB Biology in the news | Scoop.it
Together with James Watson, Francis Crick discovered the structure of DNA, one of the most important scientific advances of the 20th century.
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Mitochondria Versus Nucleus | The Scientist Magazine®

Mitochondria Versus Nucleus | The Scientist Magazine® | IB Biology in the news | Scoop.it
Disruptions in the interaction between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA can lead to deficiencies in the mitochondrial energy-generating process, affecting fitness.
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