IB&A Level Geography
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IB&A Level Geography
Interesting Case studies for IB/A level
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Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time

Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it

Until now, there has been a lack of solid, comprehensive spatial data about African groundwater resources.  Researchers have now done so.  For a more academic article on the subject, here are their findings in Environmental Research Letters. 

 

  


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President Obama on Geography Education

President Obama participated in this year's National Geographic Bee to to "celebrate the important role that geography plays in all our lives."  During that event he made a statement that I think geographers should use more.  Go to 0:45-1:10 in the video clip to hear this message or see the transcript below. 

 

"The study of geography is about more than just memorizing places on a map. It's about understanding the complexity of our world, appreciating the diversity of cultures that exists across continents. And in the end, it's about using all that knowledge to help bridge divides and bring people together."   

 

-President Barack Obama (cool guy)

 

Tags: Geography, GeographyEducation, video, geo-inspiration.


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GIS student's comment, September 9, 2012 10:24 PM
This is a great step for America. Nothing better than the President of the United States pushing for Geography and Geography Education. President Obama tells us what geography really is about, "It's about understanding the complexity of our world, appreciating the diversity of cultures that exists across continents." This is something that every student should know because without appreciating diversity and culture, how can one truly be American, a land where diversity is its heritage.
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Global CO2 emissions

Animated time-lapse video of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions in map form, spanning the 18th century until this current first decade of the 21st centur...

 

This is not a complete data set, but the video still shows the striking connection between CO2 emissions and  the historical geography of industrialization.


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Seth Dixon's comment, August 2, 2012 2:21 PM
I'd love to take credit for this, but I didn't create this video, but am simply sharing a resource that I found online with the broader community. Follow the YouTube link to see info about the creator there (Cuagau1).
Mark V's comment, September 4, 2012 11:41 AM
Frightening and guilt inducing. The US and Europe the biggest historical violators, plus living in the northeastern part of the country which shows the highest concentrations.
Rafael CAYUELA's curator insight, February 3, 3:18 PM

Interesting and well done..

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Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010 | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it
How we die (in one chart)...

 

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer) What are the geographic factors that influence these shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society?  Has anything worsened?  How come?  


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Kim Vignale's comment, July 9, 2012 10:33 PM
In the 1900s, there were more "natural" caused illnesses but not enough medicine or technology to alleviate these diseases, hence, the greater mortality rate. Presently, medicine and technology has changed for the greater good. Many of the diseases are cured and more people living longer due to this. However, mortality caused by heart disease and cancer have increased in 2010; this is probably due to higher calorie diets and exposure to preservatives and radiation.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 10, 2012 7:17 PM
Looking back and comparing the 1900’s to 2010, I think it is becoming quite evident that our surrounding environment and what we consume impacts our health. Honestly what kind of cancer are you not at risk of getting today? Factors can vary from the genetically altered food we consume, radiation emitted from our cell phones or even prolonged exposure to the sun. While combating harmful pathogens and bacteria may have been a critical health concern and challenge of the early 20th century, finding remedies to an increasingly toxic environment may characterize the medical needs of the 21st century.
Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:50 PM

The thing that is positive about this infograph on how we die, is that our mortality rate has indeed gone down a whole lot since 1900. As the article states, we have become more aware of the bacteria taht surrounds us and have learned to be more clean because of it. This has surely cut down the rate in which people die by infectious diseases. However, it is interesting to see that heart diseases remains in one of the top ways that we die, even to this day. Accident deaths have also significantly dropped, probably due to the safety measures taken in the workplaces, or the technological advances that have made fighting wars, less deadly than during the 1900s. 

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One Year of Clouds Covering the Earth

One Year of Clouds Covering the Earth | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it
At any moment, about 60 percent of the earth is covered by clouds, which have a huge influence on the climate.

Via Fortunato Navarro Sanz
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Mapping Global Life Expectancies | All That Is Interesting

Mapping Global Life Expectancies | All That Is Interesting | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it
A fascinating map that charts the life expectancies of people across the world.

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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World Urban Areas Population and Density: A 2012 Update | Newgeography.com

World Urban Areas Population and Density: A 2012 Update | Newgeography.com | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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The Geography of Poverty

The Geography of Poverty | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it

WHERE do the world’s poor live? The obvious answer: in poor countries. But is this age old assumption still the case in the 21st century?

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Philippine capital hit by floods

Philippine capital hit by floods | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it
Flooding caused by torrential rain paralyses parts of Manila, forcing tens of thousands to flee and closing schools, offices and the stock exchange.
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Vast African water source found

Vast African water source found | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it
A newly discovered water source in Namibia could have a major impact on development in the driest country in sub-Saharan Africa.
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America and the West’s dirty little secret

America and the West’s dirty little secret | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it
By importing goods from polluting factories in Asia, Americans and others in developed countries underwrite carbon emissions...

 

This is a compelling question: are reductions in greenhouse gases best measured by production or consumption?  The question that this article is posing is essentially trying to find blame for greenhouse gas emmision, but thinking geographically, ponders where along the commodity chain should the bulk of the blame be placed.  What do you think?  


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Bangladesh: Facing the Challenge of Climate Change

Global warming does not impact all areas equally, and in the future the less environmentally resilient countries will be at increasingly at risk.  Bangladesh, as a flat area prone to flooding, is especially vulnerable to anthropogenic climate change.  However, Bangladesh has implemented many changes in the cultural ecology to make sure that they are using the land differently to strengthen their environmental resilience.     


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Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 10:08 PM

When I think of innovation Bangladesh is not a place I think of. Yet they are coming up with innovative ways to deal with the global climate change. It is sad they are so effected by something they did not cause. 

Stacey Jackson's curator insight, May 8, 2013 8:29 PM

It was inspiring to see people in Bangladesh use ingenuity to adapt to climate change. Considering the nation's vulnerability to the effect of climate change, the introduction of solar panels, rain water harvesting and other techniques is essential. Maybe if other countries had the same sense of urgency, we would be making greater progress in terms of reversing climate change.

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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Arctic ice loss adding equivalent to 20 additional years of greenhouse gas emissions

Arctic ice loss adding equivalent to 20 additional years of greenhouse gas emissions | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it

Melting of white Arctic ice, currently at its lowest level in recent history, is causing more absorption. Thirty years ago there was typically about eight million square kilometres of ice left in the Arctic in the summer, and by 2007 that had halved, it had gone down to about four million, and this year it has gone down below that. The volume of ice in the summer is only a quarter of what it was 30 years ago and that's really the prelude to this final collapse.

 

The polar ice cap acts as a giant parasol, reflecting sunlight back into the atmosphere in what is known as the albedo effect. But white ice and snow reflect far more of the sun's energy than the open water that is replacing it as the ice melts. Instead of being reflected away from the Earth, this energy is absorbed, and contributes to warming.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Historical Earthquake Data

Historical Earthquake Data | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it
This map of all the world's recorded earthquakes between 1898 and 2003 is stunning. As you might expect, it also creates a brilliant outline of the plates of the Earth's crust—especially the infamous "Ring of Fire" around the Pacific Plate.

 

The plate boundaries are amazingly vivid in this geovisualization of the all the earthquakes over  a 105 year span.  How did scientist orginally come up with the theory of plate tectonics?  How did spatial thinking and mapping play a role in that scientific endeavor?


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3-man sailboat makes record voyage

Warming global temperatures and melting polar ice caps have helped a trio of explorers go where few men have gone before.


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The True Size Of Africa | All That Is Interesting

The True Size Of Africa | All That Is Interesting | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it
While Africa tends to take up little space in our consciousness and subsequent policies, the geographical truth of the continent is much more vast.

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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The Geography of Charitable Giving

The Geography of Charitable Giving | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it
Ever wonder how charitable the people are who live in your area? It turns out that lower-income people tend to donate a much bigger share of their discretionary incomes than wealthier people, according to a new study.
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Beyond 7 Billion

Beyond 7 Billion | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it
After remaining stable for most of human history, the world's population has exploded over the last two centuries. The boom is not over: The biggest generation in history is just entering its childbearing years.

 

The Los Angeles Times has produced an in-depth interactive feature centered around the impact of an increasing global population.  With videos, population clocks, narrated graphics, maps, photos and articles, this is treasure trove of resources that cuts across many disciplines. 


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Trisha Klancar's comment, August 21, 2012 2:34 PM
Great link, thanks!
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The Geography of Foreign Aid

The Geography of Foreign Aid | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it

You can choose a country by clicking the map or by selecting the name of the country from the drop down box above.


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Qatar To Make Artificial Cloud

Qatar To Make Artificial Cloud | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it
I'll start this post off with a geography lesson for those of you who don't know where Qatar is. All you need to know based off of this map is one thing: IT'S FREAKING HOT! On average in the summer it can reach up to 104 degrees.
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Saudi women allowed into Olympics

Saudi women allowed into Olympics | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it

"Saudi Arabia is to allow its women athletes to compete in the Olympics for the first time ever, a statement by the country's London embassy says."  In what is viewed as sensitive 'baby steps' towards inclusion for women in activities most in the West take for granted, females will be competing for the Saudi Olympic team in London, something that has been forbidden until very recently.  Allowing their participation also alleviates pressure from the entire team being disqualified due to gender discrimination.  (Apparently they can ride horses - will driving automobiles be far behind?) 


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Rj Ocampo's comment, August 26, 2012 6:14 PM
I believe its amazing to see women from Saudi Arabia to compete in the Olympics. It gives them a chance to take a huge role in their society and may increase their chances of getting more rights in the future.
Audrey Williamson's comment, August 27, 2012 7:51 PM
i think it is great that Saudi Arabia is now letting women compete in the Olympics, it is a small step, but hopefully in the future it will be a gateway to much more freedom for the women.
Haley Wayland's comment, September 3, 2012 12:35 AM
I think it is amazing that Saudi Arabia allowed women to compete in the Olympics. It may just be a small step, but it may open a huge range of opportunities for the Saudi Arabia women. Hopefully, as time progresses, they will be able to have as much freedom as women here, in the United States, do.
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Africa Takes Off

Africa Takes Off | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it

Ask this question: Which region of the world currently is the home to 6 of the 10 fastest growing economies?  Most people (myself included) would be surprised to hear that the region is sub-Saharan Africa.  While Sub-Saharan Africa is still the least economically developed region with some very significant challenges, too often Africa is only taught as a region of problems and negative patterns.  

 

Trade between Africa and the rest of the world has tripled in the last decade.  Since 2005, Africa is officially receiving more private foreign investment than official aid.  With many counties "skipping the landline phase" and going straight to cell phone technologies, the rapid acceleration of technology means that they Africa's economic infrastructure has the potential to increase quickly.      


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