IB&A Level Geography
Follow
Find tag "infographic"
423 views | +0 today
IB&A Level Geography
Interesting Case studies for IB/A level
Curated by Evie Plumb
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Evie Plumb from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Climate Change Infographic

Climate Change Infographic | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ignacio Conejo Moreno's curator insight, March 3, 2013 6:52 AM

Chungo futuro se nos presenta, si no cambiamos nuestros hábitos!

Emily Ross Cook's curator insight, March 4, 2013 8:44 AM

Humans must change their ways - what are some real life recommendations for changing?

mrjacquot's curator insight, March 6, 2013 8:48 PM

For all the doubters...

Rescooped by Evie Plumb from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Women and Land Infographic

Women and Land Infographic | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it
Landesa partners with governments and local NGOs to ensure the world's poorest families have secure land rights, which develops sustainable economic growth and improves education, nutrition, and conservation...

 

Globally speaking, women are the primary agricultural workers yet rarely own land. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Michael Crumpton's comment, March 20, 2013 8:38 PM
I'm not quite sure i understand why the woman aren't allowed time saving technalogy if it is they who till the fields. Why is that?
dilaycock's comment, March 21, 2013 1:30 AM
I think the answer lies in the patriarchal nature of many societies in the developing world. Women provide the labour, but are not in a position to make decisions about management of the land. This situation is exacerbated by gender inequities regarding access to education.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 5:27 PM

New portion of the AP HUG Outline regarding Women in Agriculture

Rescooped by Evie Plumb from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

60 SECONDS ON THE INTERNET

60 SECONDS ON THE INTERNET | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it

Globalization at it's best!


Via Beth Dichter
more...
de Bruijne Benjamin's comment, June 18, 2013 5:40 AM
Et dire que c'est la crise !
Jennifer Samuels's curator insight, June 21, 2013 7:40 PM

I'll have to check the sources, but it doesn't sound unreasonable.

Joshua Lipworth's curator insight, July 24, 2013 11:19 AM

This is great because of blah blah blah

Rescooped by Evie Plumb from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Economic Inequality

Economic Inequality | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 20, 2013 3:48 PM

Make your own conclusions...

Tony Hall's curator insight, February 20, 2013 11:44 PM

Really good series of infographics on unequal distribution of wealth in the world. Perfect for teaching IB Geography Disparities in Wealth topic.

Rescooped by Evie Plumb from A perspective of our world
Scoop.it!

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010 | IB&A Level Geography | Scoop.it
How we die (in one chart)...

 

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer) What are the geographic factors that influence these shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society?  Has anything worsened?  How come?  


Via Seth Dixon, Fortunato Navarro Sanz
more...
Kim Vignale's comment, July 9, 2012 10:33 PM
In the 1900s, there were more "natural" caused illnesses but not enough medicine or technology to alleviate these diseases, hence, the greater mortality rate. Presently, medicine and technology has changed for the greater good. Many of the diseases are cured and more people living longer due to this. However, mortality caused by heart disease and cancer have increased in 2010; this is probably due to higher calorie diets and exposure to preservatives and radiation.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 10, 2012 7:17 PM
Looking back and comparing the 1900’s to 2010, I think it is becoming quite evident that our surrounding environment and what we consume impacts our health. Honestly what kind of cancer are you not at risk of getting today? Factors can vary from the genetically altered food we consume, radiation emitted from our cell phones or even prolonged exposure to the sun. While combating harmful pathogens and bacteria may have been a critical health concern and challenge of the early 20th century, finding remedies to an increasingly toxic environment may characterize the medical needs of the 21st century.
Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:50 PM

The thing that is positive about this infograph on how we die, is that our mortality rate has indeed gone down a whole lot since 1900. As the article states, we have become more aware of the bacteria taht surrounds us and have learned to be more clean because of it. This has surely cut down the rate in which people die by infectious diseases. However, it is interesting to see that heart diseases remains in one of the top ways that we die, even to this day. Accident deaths have also significantly dropped, probably due to the safety measures taken in the workplaces, or the technological advances that have made fighting wars, less deadly than during the 1900s.