I want more science fiction
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I want more science fiction
Science fiction and content that may inspire it
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Ridley Scott Returns to Sci-Fi for The Forever War - IGN

Ridley Scott Returns to Sci-Fi for The Forever War - IGN | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it
The screenwriter of Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters will adapt the classic sci-fi novel The Forever War for producer/director Ridley Scott.
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Pulp Science Fiction Under German Totalitarianism

Pulp Science Fiction Under German Totalitarianism | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it
Pulp science fiction — in this case, meaning both serial magazines and stories and films which emphasized action, adventure, and plot at the expense of character and aspirations to Art —...
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Twelve Forever: Ray Bradbury’s New Lost Story “Dear Santa” | Tor.com

Twelve Forever: Ray Bradbury’s New Lost Story “Dear Santa” | Tor.com | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it

Published for the first time ever in today's issue of The Strand Magazine—the venerable publication that first brought Sherlock Holmes to the world—is perhaps the final lost story from the late Ray Bradbury. Among the endlessly appealing aspects of Bradbury; his insistence upon clinging to childhood at all costs remains perhaps his most consistent theme. Bradbury believed that “If you enjoy living, it is not difficult to keep the sense of wonder.” Further, he was delightfully immature about his interests, asserting “I have never listened to anyone who criticized my taste in space travel, sideshows or gorillas. When this occurs, I pack up my dinosaurs and leave the room.”


Via Ricardo Lourenço, Artur Coelho
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Review of The Hidden Reality: this book covers 7 wildly different multiverse theories

Review of The Hidden Reality: this book covers 7 wildly different multiverse theories | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it
This book covers a LOT of ground. I consider myself fairly well versed in physics in a broader sense having always found that science quite interesting. Even following the field to some degree, it’s easy to get “behind.” The Hidden Reality really did an excellent job of capturing my interest and discussing the topic at hand: multiple universe (multiverse) theories.
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Biology in Science Fiction: Cyborgs and enhanced humans - should we worry?

Biology in Science Fiction: Cyborgs and enhanced humans - should we worry? | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it

It's not just human limbs that can be replaced. For the vision impaired there are artificial retinas and plastic polymer replacement lenses under development. And hundreds of thousands of electronic cochlear ear implants have allowed the deaf or severely hearing impaired to hear. Hip and knee joint replacements are almost routine.

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What is Science Fiction for?

What is Science Fiction for? | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it

NOTE: Thank you so much to everyone who wished us health and safety during and after Hurricane Sandy! I’m happy to report that we’ve got power, cell service, Internet, and cable TV all working again. Thanks again. If anyone wants to help those hit much worse than we were, I urge everyone to make a donation to the American Red Cross Hurricane Relief fund.

No matter how many times the community debates science fiction’s viability, direction, and future, a fundamental question goes unasked: What is the purpose of science fiction? The answer to that question is at the heart of every (often recurring) debate about the genre, yet I have rarely seen it asked directly. Consider:

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Free Philip K. Dick: download 11 short science fiction stories

Free Philip K. Dick: download 11 short science fiction stories | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it

Although he died when he was only 53 years old, Philip K. Dick (1928 – 1982) published 44 novels and 121 short stories during his lifetime and solidified his position as arguably the most literary of science fiction writers. His novel Ubik appears on TIME magazine’s list of the 100 best English-language novels, and Dick is the only science fiction writer to get honored in the prestigious Library of America series, a kind of pantheon of American literature.

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Worldbuilding - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Worldbuilding - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it

Worldbuilding is the process of constructing an imaginary world, sometimes associated with a whole fictional universe.[1] The resulting world may be called a constructed world or a conworld.[2][better source needed] The term "worldbuilding" was popularized at science fiction writers' workshops in the 1970s. Developing an imaginary setting with coherent qualities such as a history, geography, and ecology is a key task for many science fiction or fantasy writers.[3] Worldbuilding often involves the creation of maps, a backstory, and people for the world. Constructed worlds can enrich the backstory and history of fictional works, and it is not uncommon for authors to revise their constructed worlds while completing its associated work. Constructed worlds can be created for personal amusement and mental exercise, or for specific creative endeavors such as novels, video games, or role-playing games.

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Allan Dale Maurer's curator insight, April 1, 2013 1:11 PM

Some of the best hard sf still relies on worldbuilding techniques. A couple of anthologies by Reginald Brentnor included entries from the likes of Poul Anderson and Hal Clement on this topic (still worth hunting down - better info than whole books on writing scifi).

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7 Best-Case Scenarios for the Future of Humanity

7 Best-Case Scenarios for the Future of Humanity | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it

Most science fictional and futurist visions of the future tend towards the negative — and for good reason. Our environment is a mess, we have a nasty tendency to misuse technologies, and we're becoming increasingly capable of destroying ourselves. But civilizational demise is by no means guaranteed. Should we find a way to manage the risks and avoid dystopic outcomes, our far future looks astonishingly bright. Here are seven best-case scenarios for the future of humanity.

Before we get started it's worth noting that many of the scenarios listed here are not mutually exclusive. If things go really well, our civilization will continue to evolve and diversify, leading to many different types of futures.


Via James Keith
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Over rated Authors-Isaac Asimov [Archive] - MobileRead Forums

Hi
have you ever finally gotten around to reading some legendary works of a very famous& celebrated genre author only to find yourself asking: What??.. are they kidding me??

I experienced this earlier this year when ,after years of admiring the Michael whelen cover Art,
I finally got the "Great" Foundation series
by Isaac Asimov for my, then new, Kindle fire.
HORRIBLE just... HORRIBLE!!!

I bailed out of Foundation about 2/3 of the way through and never revisited the series.

First it all seemed awfully dated with his talk about "nuclear powered" this and that

Second the complete lack of powerful or relevant, influential female characters.
it read like a cheesy 1950's sci fi novel where all women are just "secretaries"

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On Science Fiction - Kurt Vonnegut

by Kurt Vonnegut

Years ago I was working in Schenectady for General Electric, completely surrounded by machines and ideas for machines, so I wrote a novel about people and machines, and machines frequently got the best of it, as machines will. (It was called Player Piano, and it's coming out in hard covers again next spring.) And I learned from the reviewers that I was a science-fiction writer.

I didn't know that. I supposed that I was writing a novel about life, about things I could not avoid seeing and hearing in Schenectady, a very real town, awkwardly set in the gruesome now. I have been a sore-headed occupant of a file-drawer labeled ''science- fiction'' ever since, and I would like out, particularly since so many serious critics regularly mistake the drawer for a tall white fixture in a comfort station.

 

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How will the world end? Writing from the near future, a sci-fi master imagines our Doomsday

How will the world end? Writing from the near future, a sci-fi master imagines our Doomsday | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it

By David Brin

 

If and when our civilization expires, we may not even agree on the cause of death. Autopsies of empires are often inconclusive.

Sixty years ago, a German historian Alexander Demandt collected 210 different theories for the fall of the Roman Empire, including attacks by nomads, food poisoning, decline of Aenean character, vanity, mercantilism, a steepening class-divide, ecological degradation, and even the notion that civilizations just get tuckered out after a while.

Some were opposites, like too much Christian piety vs. too little. Or too much tolerance of internal deviance vs. the lack of it. Other reasons may have added together, piling like fatal straws on a camel’s back.

Now it’s your turn! Unlike those elitist compilers over at the Pandora Foundation, our open-source doomsday system invites you, the public, to participate in evaluating how it’s all going to end.

Using World Model 2035 as a shared starting condition, we’ve seed-slotted a thousand general doom scenarios. Groups are already forming to team-reify them. So join one, bringing your biases and special skills. Or else, start your own doomsday scenario, no matter how crackpot! Is Earth running out of phlogiston? Will mole people rise out of the ground, bent on revenge? Later, we’ll let quantum comparators rank every story according to probabilities.

But for now, it’s time for old-fashioned, unmatched human imagination. So have fun! Make your best case.

Convince us all that your chosen Failure Mode is the one that will bring us all down!

To get you started, let’s review the vast range of doom scenarios that have already been cataloged by the good (though dour) folks over at Pandora’s Cornucopia: ...


Via Artur Coelho
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You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet, More Progressive Science Fiction | OurFuture.org

I wasn't raised in a house with liberal social values. My parents didn't even think I should plan on going to college.
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Vote For the Best Science Fiction and Fantasy in Two Separate Centuries – Whatever

Vote For the Best Science Fiction and Fantasy in Two Separate Centuries – Whatever | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it
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Over-extrapolation and rhetorical scientificity in science fiction

Over-extrapolation and rhetorical scientificity in science fiction | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it

I’ve been thinking lately about the importance many readers and authors place on science in science fiction.

It doesn’t bother me that people like to have science in their fiction: it’s one way to create the effect of reality and it can be intellectually stimulating and educational at some levels and in some ways. But, it’s only one way to create the effect of reality…

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Poul Anderson, Stanislaw Lem, Philip K. Dick and me

Poul Anderson, Stanislaw Lem, Philip K. Dick and me | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it
Most of the early writers of science fiction seemed to be either amateurs who began writing sf when they knew of no market for it, or professional writers on mostly quite other themes, who jumped over to science fiction for its freedom of plotting.
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World first: Chinese scientists teleport data, laying the groundwork for quantum computing — or interplanetary Internet

World first: Chinese scientists teleport data, laying the groundwork for quantum computing — or interplanetary Internet | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it

Interplanetary Internet, anyone?

While NASA is busy extending the Internet to outer space by increasing fault-tolerance and caching for packets traveling long distances over long periods of time, Chinese scientists are helping invent something that could make communication between Mars and Earth even more reliable. Or help create the next generation of quantum computers.

I’m talking about data teleportation. Data has been teleported before — as far as 89 miles — but never between two large, physically visible objects.

So the scientists at Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences in Anhui, China entangled photonic quantum bits in a quantum memory node, sent one of the entangled particles to another quantum memory node via an optical cable, made changes to the spinwave state of the nearby photon, and observed the same changes happening in the remote photo.

If you understand this, you’re a genius. Stop reading immediately and create a Star Trek-style matter teleporter, charge the world royalties, and retire as the richest human in the history of the world.

The stupid translation — meaning one I can understand — is that some super-smart geeks mysteriously connected two tiny particles so that they want to be twins but cruelly separated them. They then made changes to Mike (the nearest one) and observed equivalent changes automatically happening in Ike (the farthest one).


Via Wildcat2030
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The Use of Cognitive Estrangement in HG Wells’ The Time Machine

How does Darko Suvin's cognitive estrangement relate to HG Wells The Time Machine?

 

Science fiction began in the late nineteenth century with the emergences of H.G Wells and Jules Verne who are often referred to as the fathers of science fiction. The novels written were based on scientific fact. Authors saw science as an integral part of science fiction and used it in order to educate their audiences. However Verne and Wells each saw that their writing was different to each other. Verne sees Wells work as invention.
Read more: http://bookstove.com/science-fiction/the-use-of-cognitive-estrangement-in-hg-wells-the-time-machine/#ixzz2CI8w1SoV ;

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Raritania: Of Genre Fiction and Literary Fiction

One of the debates currently roiling the section of the blogosphere devoted to science fiction is the one regarding the relative standing of genre and literary fiction - a now-ancient argument into which Arthur Krystal's essay in the New Yorker back in May, and a follow-up this past month, have breathed new life.

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Letters of Note: Blade Runner will prove invincible

Letters of Note: Blade Runner will prove invincible | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it

On October 11th of 1981, having just seen a pre-release glimpse of Blade Runner — a movie that was based on his novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, and which is now regarded by many as the greatest science fiction film ever made — a delighted Philip K. Dick wrote the following letter to the production company responsible for the film and shared his enthusiasm.

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The Machines Of Desire

The Machines Of Desire | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it

"And, I think, partly because I’m terminally infected with the metaphor: that we can build our way out of anything, bound not by our imaginations but only by the speed at which we can develop the necessary skills to make what we see in our heads. I mean, if we’re going to be in the business of selling fantasies, I don’t think it’s a bad one to sell."


Via Artur Coelho
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SF & Fantasy need to stop being so damn eager to please « Damien G. Walter

SF & Fantasy need to stop being so damn eager to please « Damien G. Walter | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it

“It just seems to me that, from Ballard to Herbert, SF was on a mission to invent and explore unknown fresh new psychologies. It was a fascinating, daunting task. We were on to something- and we lost the nerve to do it.”

There’s nothing less interesting than something which only exists to please you. And sometimes things of this kind aren’t just dull, but radically off putting and even offensive. Because something that only aims to please is by its nature manipulative, maybe even exploitative. It’s only trying to please you because it wants something from you. And if the thing it wants is money. Well that’s the most boring and offensive thing of all.

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Allan Dale Maurer's curator insight, April 1, 2013 2:13 PM

I'm not sure he's reading the same SF I'm reading.

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Identifying first, second and third artists in science fiction

Identifying first, second and third artists in science fiction | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it

I came across an interesting post the other week about first, second and third artists in fiction, with particular reference to SF. It overlaps quite well with my last post about progressive conservative, recursive conventional/commercial and radical/experiemental SF forms.

 

The post is a short lament about the belief that SF has largely become the haunting ground of the third artist, which is probably a derogatory term...

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Speculative versus magical technology in high-tech science fiction

Speculative versus magical technology in high-tech science fiction | I want more science fiction | Scoop.it

High-tech science fiction is full or ironies and conflicts. One of the more interesting is the scientistic derision of magical technology. At its extreme, it seems to me to be a negation of the terms of high-tech; a set of scientistic limits imposed upon how far high-technism should, as opposed to could, go…

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Allan Dale Maurer's curator insight, April 1, 2013 2:07 PM

So much SF I read these days - especially what is more properly called science fantasy - leaves out overt explanations of the fantastic elements or offers an explanation that is itsefl fantastic. What do you think about that?