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The Sinking of the Lusitania-- (1918)


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Interesting 9 minute film

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 7, 2014 9:44 PM

On the 99th anniversary of the sinking of the Lusitania, here's a groundbreaking animated propaganda film, dating from 1918, by pioneer animator Winsor McCay.  This is a fascinating historical glimpse at the event as it was recorded at the time, but also demonstrates the power of a new form of technology and how it was used to legitimize military action.  

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The Weekly Wandererhttps://blu173.mail.live.com/?tid=cmRts8QTZc5BGyiQAiZMIHDg2&fid=flinbox&paid=cmvPWjP5Nc5BGpqQAiZMJDPA2&pad=2014-10-25T22%3A07%3A07.407Z&pat=2&pidx=2

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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 26, 2014 12:08 PM
Foto Friday | Gondolier Under the Rialto Bridge, Venice
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 26, 2014 12:11 PM

The Weekly Wanderer

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Where's the best country to die?

Where's the best country to die? | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Palliative care varies dramatically around the globe but the United Kingdom tops the list, says Baroness Finlay, the chairwoman of the National Council for Palliative Care

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Organic Farming on One Acre or Less

Organic Farming on One Acre or Less | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Organic farming is possible even with a small piece of land.

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A Great Idea

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Why are we so reliant on air conditioning? (It's not just climate change, it's bad design)

Why are we so reliant on air conditioning? (It's not just climate change, it's bad design) | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Air conditioners have made architects lazy, and we've forgotten how to design houses that might work without it.

 

A hundred years ago, a house in Florida looked different than a house in New England. The northern house might be boxy, have relatively small windows, almost always two stories with low ceilings, and a big fireplace in the middle. 

In Florida, the house might have high ceilings, tall double-hung windows, and deep porches. Trees would be planted around the house to block the sun. 

Today, houses pretty much look the same wherever you go in North America, and one thing made this possible: central air conditioning. Now, the United States uses more energy for air conditioning than 1 billion people in Africa use for everything.

 

Tags: planning, architecture, housing, urban, place, environment adapt, energy, consumption.


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A GOOD STORY ABOUT AIR CONDITIONING

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 21, 2015 12:44 PM

The recent demographic shift to the "Sun Belt" in the U.S.  coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors).  Our homes are less regionally distinct and in terms of the human/environmental interactions, our answer is greater modifications as opposed to regional adaptations...this article is a call for more architectural improvements instead of more energy consumption to beat the heat.  In Europe however, they see the United States as "over air-conditioned" in the summer.

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:18 PM

The recent demographic shift to the "Sun Belt" in the U.S.  coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors).  Our homes are less regionally distinct and in terms of the human/environmental interactions, our answer is greater modifications as opposed to regional adaptations...this article is a call for more architectural improvements instead of more energy consumption to beat the heat.  In Europe however, they see the United States as "over air-conditioned" in the summer.

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Expanding the Panama Canal

Expanding the Panama Canal | I've started a blog | Scoop.it

"In 2006, Panamanians approved a referendum to expand the Panama Canal, doubling its capacity and allowing far larger ships to transit the 100-year-old waterway between the Atlantic and Pacific. Work began in 2007 to raise the capacity of Gatun Lake and build two new sets of locks, which would accommodate ships carrying up to 14,000 containers of freight, tripling the size limit. Sixteen massive steel gates, weighing an average of 3,100 tons each, were built in Italy and shipped to Panama to be installed in the new locks. Eight years and $5.2 billion later, the expansion project is nearing completion. The initial stages of flooding the canals have begun and the projected opening date has been set for April of 2016."


Tag: Panama, images, transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


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Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:00 PM

I think that much of Central America is presented in Western media as an extremely violent, backwards region, where narcotics and other "hidden" markets dominate the nation's social, cultural, and political structures. Although there is some truth to this, this rendition not only exaggerates the problems these nations face, but help to reinforce negative stereotypes of the region commonly held by many Americans. A story of progress- such as this story of the Panama canal- is widely ignored, which is a shame. The Panama Canal is one of the most crucial waterways in the world, and expanding it will undoubtedly help the Panamanian economy. Although it initially served as the ultimate symbol of colonialism- the United States caused a war and unrecognizably altered the geography of the region to complete the project- it today serves as a symbol of progress in a region of the world widely ignored. It will be interesting to see the impacts this expansion has on trade in the region, as well as the local geography.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 8:31 AM

the expanding of the panama canal is a major event, as everything from flow of trade to the maximum size of ships will be impacted by this improvement. the Iowa class of us battleship was two feet then the canal, specifically so they could go through if they needed to.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:11 AM

This gallery of 29 images is filled with great teaching images.

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America's Quirkiest Towns

America's Quirkiest Towns | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
They ranked hundreds of towns for such magnetic qualities as vibrant main streets, coffee bars, and an eco-friendly vibe. And while plenty of those features may contribute to a town’s unique personality, the top 20 winners in the quirky category take it a step further. One highly ranked town is an unlikely hotbed for Tibetan monks, while another largely forgoes Valentine’s Day to celebrate Charles Darwin instead.

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Great pictures from  travel & leisure

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Why South Carolina’s Confederate flag isn’t at half-staff after church shooting

Why South Carolina’s Confederate flag isn’t at half-staff after church shooting | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
The battle over a fraught symbol is resurrected.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 20, 2015 9:33 AM

The AME church in Charleston S.C. was targeted in a racist-motivated terrorist attack this week.  Many racial issues have come to the fore in the wake of this attack.  Two flags were lowered more than 100 miles away in Columbia, the state’s capital, the one's picture above flying on the dome of the state house.  Whether South Carolina politicians want to or not, the issue of the Confederate Battle Flag has resurfaced because as a sanctioned part of the cultural landscape, it's symbolism is continually called into question.

 

Tags: raceconflict, racism, historical, the Southlandscape.

Christopher L. Story's curator insight, June 22, 2015 9:11 AM

The politics of the flag...amazing

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If modern farming can't sustain bees, how much longer can it sustain us?

If modern farming can't sustain bees, how much longer can it sustain us? | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Our bees and wider farmland ecosystems have been seriously harmed by neonicotinoids, writes Dave Goulson.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neonicotinoid

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Fliss Clooney's curator insight, May 14, 2015 8:09 AM

My local bees are declining in number all the time.  A world without bees is unthinkable.  An important article from the Ecologist

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Events Commemorating Genocide Centennial Begin in Providence

Events Commemorating Genocide Centennial Begin in Providence | I've started a blog | Scoop.it

“For most of the world, the Armenian Genocide is the slaughter you know next to nothing about. But every year on April 24, Genocide Remembrance Day, we Armenians remember the injustice of a crime that is rarely acknowledged and often flatly denied. It was April 24, 1915, when the Armenian intellectuals, professionals, editors and religious leaders in Constantinople were rounded up by the Ottoman authorities — and almost all of them executed. During World War I, the Ottoman Empire killed three of every four of its Armenian citizens. The majority of Armenians alive today are descendants of the few survivors.”


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I did not know that this ever existed

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 21, 2015 8:55 AM

Rhode Island is acknowledging and commemorating the genocide committed by the Ottoman Empire against the Armenia people 100 years ago.  The State House Dome is currently illuminated in red, blue, and orange in commemoration of the Centennial of the Armenian Genocide--it will remain lit in these colors until April 24. Many events are happening throughout the state, including one at Rhode Island College, which will host some musical performances on Wednesday

2.5 million Armenians lived in the Ottoman Empire--1.5 million were killed. Not just killed, but horrifically slaughtered--beheaded, crucified, burned alive in their churches, loaded like cattle onto freight trains and sent to concentration camps, raped, assaulted, sold as slaves, herded into the DerAzor desert and left to die.

The United Nations recognizes the massacres and the systematic destruction of two-thirds of the Armenian population as the first genocide of the 20th century, and has stated that the mishandling of its aftermath set the stage for future genocides, from the Holocaust to Rwanda and Sudan and everything in between. Hitler studied what happened and borrowed many of the Ottoman Empire’s techniques to use against the Jews.

And even though some countries in the world recognize and agree with the UN assessment of the fact, Turkey denies it, and the US still stands silent and refuses to officially state that what happened was genocide...because to do so would offend Turkey, and Turkey is a US political ally.  Many are calling on Israel, a country founded in large part because of a genocide, to acknowledge the first genocide of the 20th century.  

Learn about genocide and teach genocide--what causes it, what perpetuates it, what the cost of denial can be. Don’t remain silent. Be a peaceful person in your own life, and in all your relations with others--and speak up about any wrong or injustice. 

*Most of this post is courtesy of Janet Rith-Najarian, professional geographer and member of the Minnesota Alliance for Geographic Education.


TagsArmenia, genocidepolitical, conflict, Turkey, war, refugees, empirecolonialism, historical.

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What I learned by befriending Iranians on Facebook

Iran looks a certain way to Westerners. But a look into the day to day lives of normal Iranians can change that perception.

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Because the government of Iran is not the people of Iran.  Just like the people hear in the US, we people are not like our government . The people of Iran love the people here I  the US. Most Iranians are simple people living simple lives

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 10, 2015 10:01 PM

Because the government of Iran is not the people of Iran.  I daresay that seems painfully obvious, but we can forget that simple truth.

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Vintage Video of NYC

"Oldest and most incredible footage of New York City ever, including where the WTC would be built. With added maps carefully researched to show where the camera was. 28 shots of classic footage circa 1905." http://tinyurl.com/ohsuobg


Tags: urban, historical, architecture, landscape, NYC.


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Surviving Film
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Maricarmen Husson's comment, March 21, 2015 2:22 PM
Amazing!
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 21, 2015 2:26 PM

"Material de archivo más antiguo y más increíble de la ciudad de Nueva York , incluyendo donde se construiría el World Trade Center. Con mapas añadidos investigado cuidadosamente para mostrar dónde estaba la cámara. 

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, March 24, 2015 4:04 PM

Etonnant !


Pour aller plus loin 


- New York d'hier à aujourd'hui : diaporama

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Like You’ve Never Before Heard It Explained

Like You’ve Never Before Heard It Explained | I've started a blog | Scoop.it

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yiU3Ndi6itk

 

Watch this important video.
 
And then watch it again with your friends.
 
Thierry Vrain, a retired biologist and genetic engineer, explains the links between glyphosate (the key ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup), GMO food and your health.
 
For everyone who has trouble explaining to friends and family why this issue is so important, and why banning glyphosate and GMO crops and foods is so critical, this video lays it out as you’ve never before heard it explained.


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Like You’ve Never Before Heard It Explained a long video
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Wuzea Recherche's comment, March 15, 2015 6:38 AM
Propose de rechercher une ressource en tapant un mot clé dans le champ de recherche. Wuzea : http://www.wuzea.com
Ba'Kem BlackSoul's curator insight, March 25, 2015 2:22 PM

Monsanto, is it in you?!  What is wealth with out health.

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9 questions about the Israel-Palestine conflict you were too embarrassed to ask

9 questions about the Israel-Palestine conflict you were too embarrassed to ask | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Yes, one of the questions is "Why are Israelis and Palestinians fighting?"

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an interesting article

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Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2015 1:02 PM

This story of the Palestinians, Israel, Arabs, and Jews has its roots in Germany at the hands of one of the worst dictators the world has ever seen, Adolf Hitler. His ethnic cleansing of Jews via torture, the gas chamber, and starvation, is one of the bleakest times in recorded humanity. The remaining Jews were a people without a land and so it was agreed that Israel would be formed to provide a safe haven. However the land has been disputed, fought over, and the borders changed so many times that it no longer resembles the initial attempt to provide a refuge for the Jews. Ironically, 700,000 Palestinians had been displaced initially and now number 7,000,000 according to the article; all of them designated as refugees. There is no solve for the problems between the Arabs, Jews, Palestinians and Israel as too much blood has been spilled, and forgiveness is a forgotten word. How do you apologize or forgive for generations of bloodshed, displaced families, borders that constantly change, and religions that contradict one another? I'm glad that I wake every day in the USA. We have our own issues to resolve, but nothing approaches the contradictions and paradoxes this area of the world must live with every day.

Claire Law's curator insight, April 26, 2015 2:07 AM

A good refresher for teachers and a start for students

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:25 PM

Its interesting to see another side to the story and what barriers are now in place from the two opposing cultures.

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The Buried Catchphrase of Classic Hollywood

“The phrase 'Free, white, and 21' appeared in dozens of movies in the ‘30s and ‘40s, a proud assertion that positioned white privilege as the ultimate argument-stopper. It was a catchphrase of the decade, as blandly ubiquitous as any modern meme: a way for white America to check its own privilege and feel exhilarated rather than finding fault.  Read more about the history of the phrase here."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 7, 2:44 PM

I found this glimpse into the American past as startling, even if it shouldn't be.  It jarred me because today many in America bristle or are startled at the notion that 'white privilege' exists today even if there are countless examples that we do not live in a post-racial society.  This glimpse of old-school Hollywood shows how asserting white privilege was common place in the lexicon--equally fascinating is how we've pretended that it never was.  White privilege is no longer flouted in polite company like it once was, but that doesn't mean that it isn't real.    

 

Tags: racecultural normslanguage, racism, culture, unit 3 culture.

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A simple choice between two gorgeous photos reveals your personality

A simple choice between two gorgeous photos reveals your personality | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Introvert or extrovert? A quick photo quiz could reveal it all.

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Great photos for an introvert 

or extrovert

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 30, 2015 9:44 PM

This psychology study found that introverts and extroverts prefer different landscapes for their vacations, and they may even seek out different environments for a home. There are many geographic implications to this idea, and I'm still chewing on them.

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Why is EU free movement so important?

Why is EU free movement so important? | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Where did the idea of free movement of people come from? The precursor to the EU was formed as European leaders came together in the wake of the Second World War, wanting to prevent another catastrophic war. The idea was that allowing people to move across the continent - from countries where there were no jobs to countries where there were labour shortages - would not only boost European growth, but would help prevent war by getting people to mix more across borders.

"The founding fathers of the European Community wanted it to be a construct that also had a political integration and for that you needed people to move because the minute people crossed boundaries and borders, you had deeper integration… So it was both a social as well as an economic aim.


Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, mobility, political, states, migration.


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A great read
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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 6:57 AM

Immigration is a major source of tension within Europe. The influx of immigrants into Europe has led to a nativist backlash in many nations. The free movement of people is a bedrock principle of the European Union. In the aftermath of the Second World War, the leaders of Europe hoped that the open borders policy would  prevent another costly war by allowing people to move to were there were jobs were located. The mixing of cultures would also prevent war. People would develop an understanding of other cultures, which would make the possibility of war more remote. The leaders did not account for the strong nativist strand that often runs through many nations. The UK is threating to withdraw from the EU over this immigration issue. While immigration on the United States gets much of the attention, a more serous crises is actually occurring in Europe.

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Why the Saudis Are Going Solar

Why the Saudis Are Going Solar | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia produces much of its electricity by burning oil, a practice that most countries abandoned long ago, reasoning that they could use coal and natural gas instead and save oil for transportation, an application for which there is no mainstream alternative. Most of Saudi Arabia’s power plants are colossally inefficient, as are its air conditioners, which consumed 70 percent of the kingdom’s electricity in 2013. Although the kingdom has just 30 million people, it is the world’s sixth-largest consumer of oil.Now, Saudi rulers say, things must change. Their motivation isn’t concern about global warming; the last thing they want is an end to the fossil-fuel era. Quite the contrary: they see investing in solar energy as a way to remain a global oil power. The Saudis burn about a quarter of the oil they produce—and their domestic consumption has been rising at an alarming 7 percent a year, nearly three times the rate of population growth.

 

Tags: Saudi Arabia, energy, resources, consumption, Middle East, sustainability.


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Good for Saudi Arabia

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Peter Phillips's curator insight, July 14, 2015 7:47 AM

Interesting take on improving the sustainability of a resource.

Dustin Fowler's curator insight, July 14, 2015 12:13 PM

A great article discussing energy reform in Saudi Arabia.  Another good source of information about some of the reforms being implemented in the kingdom can be found at this link:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVgWtOeWNgg

 

Interesting to see how this change in energy consumption will effect Saudi politics and the economy. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 21, 2015 2:29 PM

The irony here is palpable- if the Saudis overtake the US in terms of solar power, I think I'd lose hope for our future. The most infamous oil-state on the planet has recognized that its costly domestic consumption of its vast oil supplies is hurting its profits, and it would rather seek an alternative energy supply to fuel its own nation so that it can sell more oil to foreign investors. The logic here is actually very sound- Saudi Arabia knows that there is money to be made by cutting down their own oil consumption, and even if the world sees how successful they are in their own adoption of solar power as their main source of electricity, most of the West won't be willing to make the same transition when there's so much Saudi oil to buy. Everyone wins- except American consumers, of course. Oh, and the planet- the burning of fossil fuels is a serious problem our generation must tackle if we are to minimize the damages created by man-made global warming. In the short-term, nothing is set in stone, as we have no idea how successful the Saudis will be in their attempt to harvest solar power on such a large scale. However, the implications of this move is huge- I can only imagine what an influx of Saudi oil on the market would do for US gas prices. 

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Why India and Bangladesh have the world's craziest border

Why India and Bangladesh have the world's craziest border | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
On July 31st India and Bangladesh will exchange 162 parcels of land, each of which happens to lie on the wrong side of the Indo-Bangladesh border. The end of these enclaves follows an agreement made between India and Bangladesh on June 6th. The territories along the world’s craziest border include the pièce de résistance of strange geography: the world’s only “counter-counter-enclave”: a patch of India surrounded by Bangladeshi territory, inside an Indian enclave within Bangladesh. How did the enclaves come into existence?The enclaves are invisible on most maps; most are invisible on the ground too. But they became an evident problem for their 50,000-odd inhabitants with the emergence of passport and visa controls. Independent India and Bangladesh—part of Pakistan until 1971—each refused to let the other administer its exclaves, leaving their people effectively stateless.According to Reece Jones, a political geographer, the plots were cut from larger territories by treaties signed in 1711 and 1713 between the maharaja of Cooch Behar and the Mughal emperor in Delhi, bringing to an end a series of minor wars.It was partition, the division of India and Pakistan, that turned the enclaves into a no-man’s-land. The Hindu maharaja of Cooch Behar chose to join India in 1949 and he brought with him the ex-Mughal, ex-British possessions he inherited. Enclaves on the other side of the new border were swallowed (but not digested) by East Pakistan, which later became Bangladesh.


Tags: borders, geopolitics, political, India, South Asia, Bangladesh.


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Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:10 AM

The images in the above article truly define how the geography of an area can not last forever. Maps are continuously changing and the border changing of Bangladesh and India is a clear example. In the map giving, we can see that there is an odd circular border forming inside of what seems or should be Bangladesh territory in the upper North of India. Because of the zigging and zagging, the border along these two country is the fifth longest in the world. It is important to understand how and why territories and regions are divided, and also the affects it has for the people in the region. Since establishing a proper border is in the works between the two countries, this will allow  residents in the region, who can now choose which country to join. The overall matter is to provide a more simpler border line without a border battle. 

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Ring of Fire

Ring of Fire | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
The Ring of Fire is a string of volcanoes and sites of seismic activity, or earthquakes, around the edges of the Pacific Ocean.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 2015 12:20 PM

The Ring of Fire is a series of plate boundaries where earthquakes and volcanic activity are commonplace.  Surrounding the edge of the Pacific Ocean, the Ring of Fire consists of a string of 452 volcanoes.


Tags physical, tectonics, disasters, K12.

Loreto Vargas's curator insight, July 2, 2015 10:07 AM

“El Anillo de Fuego” es una cadena de volcanes y lugares de actividad sísmica, o temblores, alrededor de los límites del Océano Pacífico.

“L’Anneau de Feu” c’est une chaine de volcans et de sites d’activité sismique, ou tremblements de terre, autour de limites de l’Océan Pacifique.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:54 PM

The Ring of Fire is a series of plate boundaries where earthquakes and volcanic activity are commonplace.  Surrounding the edge of the Pacific Ocean, the Ring of Fire consists of a string of 452 volcanoes.

 

Tags: physical, tectonics, disasters, K12.

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Vandals destroy dam, release 49 million gallons of water into Bay

Vandals destroy dam, release 49 million gallons of water into Bay | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Fremont police say vandals attacked an inflatable dam on Alameda Creek that resulted in the loss of nearly 50 million gallons of water.

Via Seth Dixon
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I saw this on RT the other  day

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 23, 2015 10:11 AM

Because what's more fun than losing nearly 50 millions gallons of freshwater during a drought?  The selfishness of some can be so disheartening for the rest of the community. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 3:12 AM

It is a real shame that people in general would react to the drought this way especially when conditions are extreme. My guess would be that the vandals had a goal not just mess around. Maybe it was a message to the city of Freemont, we will have to see in the future.

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Ottoman Empire against the Armenian people 100 years ago. - Google Search

Ottoman Empire against the Armenian people 100 years ago. - Google Search | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
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Ottoman Empire against the Armenian people 100 years ago.

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Women On 20s

Women On 20s | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Women On 20s aims to compel historic change by convincing President Obama that NOW is the time to put a woman's face on our paper currency. But who should it be? We believe that's for you, the public, to decide from a slate of inspiring American women heroes.

Via Seth Dixon
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I saw this same post on face book

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 10, 2015 10:46 AM

History isn't just about the past--it's also a communal experience about how we collectively choose to remember the past.  How we tell history tells us as much about ourselves as it does previous generations. 

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Where Isis supporters tweet from

Where Isis supporters tweet from | I've started a blog | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Interesting that we only rank 4th

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zane alan berger's curator insight, March 25, 2015 5:38 PM

this photo represents the number of people supporting ISIS worldwide, with the greatest numbers in Saudi Arabia, Syria, and Iraq- Middle Eastern states. It also exposes the surprising number of supporters within the United States.

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:18 PM

This article deals with unit 4 because it has to do with centrifugal forces and war. The graph shows where ISIS is tweeting from and where it is the most and least common. For example Saudi Arabia is the highest with 866 and Tunisia is the lowest with 125 . There is also a graduated symbol map displaying where the tweets are coming from with different sized circles. This is a centrifugal force because it makes the country ISIS is in fight more. This graph and map displays where the conflict is going on and can be helpful for people to research the play of ISIS in their country. 

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Wargaming: computerized scenario planning

Stratfor conducted extensive scenario planning when considering Russia's offensive military options toward Ukraine. In this video some of the broader themes and deduction will be examined.
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Daniel Rasmus's curator insight, March 19, 2015 6:37 PM

Interesting exploration of what Russia might do in Eastern Europe. Great examples of scenario planning - facts and how things might work. Eliminate the impossible and reveal the real options.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 2015 9:05 PM

Technology can be useful when designing strategies and making political decisions when war hits countries. War-gaming can be helpful for Ukraine and even for Russian governments on how to refine their military and political strategies during war. It simulates the question &what if& and can be tested without being hazardous for any one. In fact, war-gaming integrates all possibilities of how and what things can be done and also can narrow to a few options. Computerized animation models help and allow for the construction and display of a lot of options of how things can be done and what can not be. War-gaming can even be useful in predicting what may be happen in the near future.

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A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet

A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Do you know how the internet gets across the ocean? This amazing map shows every cable that makes it possible.

Via Seth Dixon
Stephen Zimmett's insight:
Seth Dixon's insight: Because globalization.
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Olivier Tabary's curator insight, March 25, 2015 4:28 PM

And no, not everything has turned virtual! We still rely on concrete stuff. Cables network says a lot about the way our World works. 

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:07 PM

This article deals with unit 1 because it has to do with maps. This map shows how underwater cables connect the internet throughout the world. The cables transmit 99% of international data instantly. On this map you can also see latency. Another map in this article shows 1912 trade routes and underwater cables today. The routes are similar and the interdependency has stayed but the methods and meanings for each of these things are different. To pass the ocean is risky by the investments, and trading. Sailors took tHess risks and now the tech companies are taking them. The cables are thin in the deep water equalling 3 inches across. In addition the cables are thicker in shallower water. The interesting thing is these cables can go as deep as Mount Everest is high. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:12 AM

Because globalization.  


Tags: Time-Space Compression, development, technology, economic, globalization, industry, unit 6 industry.

Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from SocialAction2015
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We Stand With Shaker: Send a Valentine's Card for Shaker Aamer to the U.S. Ambassador in London, to Ask for His Release from Guantánamo - Articles - Welcome to "Close Guantánamo"

We Stand With Shaker: Send a Valentine's Card for Shaker Aamer to the U.S. Ambassador in London, to Ask for His Release from Guantánamo - Articles - Welcome to "Close Guantánamo" | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
@Darcy DelaproserFor the 13th anniversary of the arrival at Guantánamo of Shaker Aamer, we're asking supporters to send a Valentine's card to the U.S. Ambassador in London, calling for his release.

Via Darcy Delaproser
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@Darcy Delaproser
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