I've started a blog
38 views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from History and Social Studies Education
onto I've started a blog
Scoop.it!

9 Things You May Not Know About the Declaration of Independence

9 Things You May Not Know About the Declaration of Independence | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
As people across the United States celebrate the nation’s birthday, explore nine surprising facts about the founding document adopted on July 4, 1776.

Via Seth Dixon
Stephen Zimmett's insight:

another interesting read by Seth

more...
No comment yet.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Stephen Zimmett
Scoop.it!

The Weekly Wandererhttps://blu173.mail.live.com/?tid=cmRts8QTZc5BGyiQAiZMIHDg2&fid=flinbox&paid=cmvPWjP5Nc5BGpqQAiZMJDPA2&pad=2014-10-25T22%3A07%3A07.407Z&pat=2&pidx=2

Stephen Zimmett's insight:

https://blu173.mail.live.com/?tid=cmRts8QTZc5BGyiQAiZMIHDg2&fid=flinbox&paid=cmvPWjP5Nc5BGpqQAiZMJDPA2&pad=2014-10-25T22%3A07%3A07.407Z&pat=2&pidx=2

more...
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 26, 2014 12:08 PM
Foto Friday | Gondolier Under the Rialto Bridge, Venice
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 26, 2014 12:11 PM

The Weekly Wanderer

Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Dakota Access Pipeline: What You Need to Know

Dakota Access Pipeline: What You Need to Know | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Conflict between Native American protesters and private security personnel over construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline has turned violent. What is the Dakota Access Pipeline?

 

Tags: industry, conflict, economic, energy, resources, environment, indigenous, ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from SocialAction2014
Scoop.it!

Ex-Prisoners Move Crowd to Tears at 40th Anniversary Dinner

Denise reports from Detroit! An evening with Senator Patrick Colbeck, ministry partners and ex-prisoners gets emotional. This was an incredible 40th Anniversary appreciation dinner for the Detroit area.

Via Darcy Delaproser
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Arctic Suicides: It's Not The Dark That Kills You

The Arctic Suicides: It's Not The Dark That Kills You | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Greenland has the world's highest suicide rate. And teen boys are at the highest risk.

 

Like native people all around the Arctic — and all over the world — Greenlanders were seeing the deadly effects of rapid modernization and unprecedented cultural interference. American Indians and Alaska Natives (many of whom share Inuit roots with Greenlanders) had already seen many of their communities buckle under the same pressures.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 21, 11:01 PM

This is an incredibly tragic story; if I could add one word to the sub-title, it would read, "It's not JUST the dark the kills you."  I'm not an environmental determinist, but we can't pretend that the climate/darkness don't play some role in Greenland having 6x the suicide rates of the United States.  See also this article/photo gallery about a similar suicide problem in the indigenous far north of Canada.    

 

Tags: Greenland, Arctic, genderpodcast, indigenous.

Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Surging Seas Interactive Map

Surging Seas Interactive Map | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Global warming has raised global sea level about 8" since 1880, and the rate of rise is accelerating. Rising seas dramatically increase the odds of damaging floods from storm surges.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 1:27 PM

This interactive map from Climate Central dramatically shows what locations are most vulnerable to sea level rise.  You can adjust the map to display anywhere from 1 to 10 feet of sea level rise to compare the impact to coastal communities.  This dynamic map lets to view other layers to contextualize potential sea level rise by toggling on layers that include, population density, ethnicity, income, property and social vulnerability.   

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, climate change, environment, resources, watercoastalmapping, visualization, environment depend, political ecology.

Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from SocialAction2014
Scoop.it!

Davontae Sanford voices frustration over lack of charges against former officer #DavontaeSanford #Exonerate #WrongfullyConvicted

Davontae Sanford voices frustration over lack of charges against former officer #DavontaeSanford #Exonerate #WrongfullyConvicted | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
This has been a hard week for Davontae Sanford. Sanford, you may remember, spent nearly nine years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit. But this week,

Via Darcy Delaproser
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

Where's the best country to die?

Where's the best country to die? | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Palliative care varies dramatically around the globe but the United Kingdom tops the list, says Baroness Finlay, the chairwoman of the National Council for Palliative Care

Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Organic Farming
Scoop.it!

Organic Farming on One Acre or Less

Organic Farming on One Acre or Less | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Organic farming is possible even with a small piece of land.

Via Giri Kumar
Stephen Zimmett's insight:

A Great Idea

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why are we so reliant on air conditioning? (It's not just climate change, it's bad design)

Why are we so reliant on air conditioning? (It's not just climate change, it's bad design) | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Air conditioners have made architects lazy, and we've forgotten how to design houses that might work without it.

 

A hundred years ago, a house in Florida looked different than a house in New England. The northern house might be boxy, have relatively small windows, almost always two stories with low ceilings, and a big fireplace in the middle. 

In Florida, the house might have high ceilings, tall double-hung windows, and deep porches. Trees would be planted around the house to block the sun. 

Today, houses pretty much look the same wherever you go in North America, and one thing made this possible: central air conditioning. Now, the United States uses more energy for air conditioning than 1 billion people in Africa use for everything.

 

Tags: planning, architecture, housing, urban, place, environment adapt, energy, consumption.


Via Seth Dixon
Stephen Zimmett's insight:

A GOOD STORY ABOUT AIR CONDITIONING

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 21, 2015 12:44 PM

The recent demographic shift to the "Sun Belt" in the U.S.  coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors).  Our homes are less regionally distinct and in terms of the human/environmental interactions, our answer is greater modifications as opposed to regional adaptations...this article is a call for more architectural improvements instead of more energy consumption to beat the heat.  In Europe however, they see the United States as "over air-conditioned" in the summer.

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:18 PM

The recent demographic shift to the "Sun Belt" in the U.S.  coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors).  Our homes are less regionally distinct and in terms of the human/environmental interactions, our answer is greater modifications as opposed to regional adaptations...this article is a call for more architectural improvements instead of more energy consumption to beat the heat.  In Europe however, they see the United States as "over air-conditioned" in the summer.

Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Expanding the Panama Canal

Expanding the Panama Canal | I've started a blog | Scoop.it

"In 2006, Panamanians approved a referendum to expand the Panama Canal, doubling its capacity and allowing far larger ships to transit the 100-year-old waterway between the Atlantic and Pacific. Work began in 2007 to raise the capacity of Gatun Lake and build two new sets of locks, which would accommodate ships carrying up to 14,000 containers of freight, tripling the size limit. Sixteen massive steel gates, weighing an average of 3,100 tons each, were built in Italy and shipped to Panama to be installed in the new locks. Eight years and $5.2 billion later, the expansion project is nearing completion. The initial stages of flooding the canals have begun and the projected opening date has been set for April of 2016."


Tag: Panama, images, transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


Via Seth Dixon
Stephen Zimmett's insight:
another great post by Seth Dixon
more...
Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:00 PM

I think that much of Central America is presented in Western media as an extremely violent, backwards region, where narcotics and other "hidden" markets dominate the nation's social, cultural, and political structures. Although there is some truth to this, this rendition not only exaggerates the problems these nations face, but help to reinforce negative stereotypes of the region commonly held by many Americans. A story of progress- such as this story of the Panama canal- is widely ignored, which is a shame. The Panama Canal is one of the most crucial waterways in the world, and expanding it will undoubtedly help the Panamanian economy. Although it initially served as the ultimate symbol of colonialism- the United States caused a war and unrecognizably altered the geography of the region to complete the project- it today serves as a symbol of progress in a region of the world widely ignored. It will be interesting to see the impacts this expansion has on trade in the region, as well as the local geography.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 8:31 AM

the expanding of the panama canal is a major event, as everything from flow of trade to the maximum size of ships will be impacted by this improvement. the Iowa class of us battleship was two feet then the canal, specifically so they could go through if they needed to.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:11 AM

This gallery of 29 images is filled with great teaching images.

Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

America's Quirkiest Towns

America's Quirkiest Towns | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
They ranked hundreds of towns for such magnetic qualities as vibrant main streets, coffee bars, and an eco-friendly vibe. And while plenty of those features may contribute to a town’s unique personality, the top 20 winners in the quirky category take it a step further. One highly ranked town is an unlikely hotbed for Tibetan monks, while another largely forgoes Valentine’s Day to celebrate Charles Darwin instead.

Via Seth Dixon
Stephen Zimmett's insight:

Great pictures from  travel & leisure

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why South Carolina’s Confederate flag isn’t at half-staff after church shooting

Why South Carolina’s Confederate flag isn’t at half-staff after church shooting | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
The battle over a fraught symbol is resurrected.

Via Seth Dixon
Stephen Zimmett's insight:

Another interesting post by Seth Dixon

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 20, 2015 9:33 AM

The AME church in Charleston S.C. was targeted in a racist-motivated terrorist attack this week.  Many racial issues have come to the fore in the wake of this attack.  Two flags were lowered more than 100 miles away in Columbia, the state’s capital, the one's picture above flying on the dome of the state house.  Whether South Carolina politicians want to or not, the issue of the Confederate Battle Flag has resurfaced because as a sanctioned part of the cultural landscape, it's symbolism is continually called into question.

 

Tags: raceconflict, racism, historical, the Southlandscape.

Christopher L. Story's curator insight, June 22, 2015 9:11 AM

The politics of the flag...amazing

Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Introducing ISIS

"The invasion of Iraq was supposed to turn the country into a democracy that posed no threat to the United States, or the rest of the world. Thirteen years later, Iraq has collapsed into three warring states. A third of the country is controlled by ISIS, who have also taken huge amounts of territory in Syria. VICE correspondent Ben Anderson gains exclusive access to the three front lines in Iraq, where Sunni, Shiite and Kurdish forces are fighting for their lives. Anderson visits with the Russian military forces in Syria, meets captured ISIS fighters in Kurdistan, and interviews US policymakers about how the situation in Iraq spun out of control."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 13, 2:15 PM

Many young students are especially baffled at how a terrorist organization can seize control of large chunks of territory.  If you are looking for a good video introduction that explains how and why ISIS was able to gain power and than gain and maintain territory, this is it (it's classroom safe despite the source). 

 

Tags: Syria, war, conflict, political, geopolitics, Iraq, devolution, terrorism, ISISMiddle East.

Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How To Get A Country To Trust Its Banks

How To Get A Country To Trust Its Banks | I've started a blog | Scoop.it

"It's something you can see on every block in most major cities. You probably see one every day and never give give it a second thought. But in Yangon, Myanmar in 2013, an ATM was a small miracle. For decades, Myanmar was cut off from the rest of the world. There were international sanctions, and no one from the U.S. or Europe did business there."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 5, 1:27 PM

We often assume that one form of technology, a system, institute should work equally well where ever it is.  But the nuances of cultural geography mediate how societies interact with technological innovations, and as demonstrated in this Planet Money podcast, "People in Myanmar (Burma) were reluctant to use ATMs because they didn't trust the banks. They weren't sure that the machines would actually give them their money."  

 

Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, poverty, development, economicpodcast.

Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Trailer: One Day on Earth

"One Day on Earth is a unique global movement, community media creation platform, and collaborative film production engine. We invite you to join our international community of thousands of filmmakers, hundreds of schools, and dozens of non-profits, and contribute to this unique global project (with a map of all participants). Many future filming events will be announced in the coming year. One Day on Earth is a community that not only watches, but participates."

 

Tags: video, mapping, social media, place, culture.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from SocialAction2014
Scoop.it!

Lawsuit claims Pamela Smart was wrongly placed in solitary confinement

Lawsuit claims Pamela Smart was wrongly placed in solitary confinement | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
A new lawsuit claims that Pamela Smart was wrongly put into solitary confinement after a prison guard found a plastic cake knife in her cell.

Via Darcy Delaproser
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Old Mexico lives on

Old Mexico lives on | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
On February 2nd 1848, following a short and one-sided war, Mexico agreed to cede more than half its territory to the United States. An area covering most of present-day Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah, plus parts of several other states, was handed over to gringolandia. The rebellious state of Tejas, which had declared its independence from Mexico in 1836, was recognised as American soil too. But a century and a half later, communities have proved more durable than borders. The counties with the highest concentration of Mexicans (as defined by ethnicity, rather than citizenship) overlap closely with the area that belonged to Mexico before the great gringo land-grab of 1848. Some are recent arrivals; others trace their roots to long before the map was redrawn. They didn’t jump the border—it jumped them.

 

Tags: culture, demographics, North America, historical, colonialism, borders, political.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Buried Catchphrase of Classic Hollywood

“The phrase 'Free, white, and 21' appeared in dozens of movies in the ‘30s and ‘40s, a proud assertion that positioned white privilege as the ultimate argument-stopper. It was a catchphrase of the decade, as blandly ubiquitous as any modern meme: a way for white America to check its own privilege and feel exhilarated rather than finding fault.  Read more about the history of the phrase here."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 7, 2:44 PM

I found this glimpse into the American past as startling, even if it shouldn't be.  It jarred me because today many in America bristle or are startled at the notion that 'white privilege' exists today even if there are countless examples that we do not live in a post-racial society.  This glimpse of old-school Hollywood shows how asserting white privilege was common place in the lexicon--equally fascinating is how we've pretended that it never was.  White privilege is no longer flouted in polite company like it once was, but that doesn't mean that it isn't real.    

 

Tags: racecultural normslanguage, racism, culture, unit 3 culture.

Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A simple choice between two gorgeous photos reveals your personality

A simple choice between two gorgeous photos reveals your personality | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Introvert or extrovert? A quick photo quiz could reveal it all.

Via Seth Dixon
Stephen Zimmett's insight:

Great photos for an introvert 

or extrovert

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 30, 2015 9:44 PM

This psychology study found that introverts and extroverts prefer different landscapes for their vacations, and they may even seek out different environments for a home. There are many geographic implications to this idea, and I'm still chewing on them.

Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why is EU free movement so important?

Why is EU free movement so important? | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Where did the idea of free movement of people come from? The precursor to the EU was formed as European leaders came together in the wake of the Second World War, wanting to prevent another catastrophic war. The idea was that allowing people to move across the continent - from countries where there were no jobs to countries where there were labour shortages - would not only boost European growth, but would help prevent war by getting people to mix more across borders.

"The founding fathers of the European Community wanted it to be a construct that also had a political integration and for that you needed people to move because the minute people crossed boundaries and borders, you had deeper integration… So it was both a social as well as an economic aim.


Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, mobility, political, states, migration.


Via Seth Dixon
Stephen Zimmett's insight:
A great read
more...
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 6:57 AM

Immigration is a major source of tension within Europe. The influx of immigrants into Europe has led to a nativist backlash in many nations. The free movement of people is a bedrock principle of the European Union. In the aftermath of the Second World War, the leaders of Europe hoped that the open borders policy would  prevent another costly war by allowing people to move to were there were jobs were located. The mixing of cultures would also prevent war. People would develop an understanding of other cultures, which would make the possibility of war more remote. The leaders did not account for the strong nativist strand that often runs through many nations. The UK is threating to withdraw from the EU over this immigration issue. While immigration on the United States gets much of the attention, a more serous crises is actually occurring in Europe.

Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why the Saudis Are Going Solar

Why the Saudis Are Going Solar | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia produces much of its electricity by burning oil, a practice that most countries abandoned long ago, reasoning that they could use coal and natural gas instead and save oil for transportation, an application for which there is no mainstream alternative. Most of Saudi Arabia’s power plants are colossally inefficient, as are its air conditioners, which consumed 70 percent of the kingdom’s electricity in 2013. Although the kingdom has just 30 million people, it is the world’s sixth-largest consumer of oil.Now, Saudi rulers say, things must change. Their motivation isn’t concern about global warming; the last thing they want is an end to the fossil-fuel era. Quite the contrary: they see investing in solar energy as a way to remain a global oil power. The Saudis burn about a quarter of the oil they produce—and their domestic consumption has been rising at an alarming 7 percent a year, nearly three times the rate of population growth.

 

Tags: Saudi Arabia, energy, resources, consumption, Middle East, sustainability.


Via Seth Dixon
Stephen Zimmett's insight:

Good for Saudi Arabia

more...
Peter Phillips's curator insight, July 14, 2015 7:47 AM

Interesting take on improving the sustainability of a resource.

Dustin Fowler's curator insight, July 14, 2015 12:13 PM

A great article discussing energy reform in Saudi Arabia.  Another good source of information about some of the reforms being implemented in the kingdom can be found at this link:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVgWtOeWNgg

 

Interesting to see how this change in energy consumption will effect Saudi politics and the economy. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 21, 2015 2:29 PM

The irony here is palpable- if the Saudis overtake the US in terms of solar power, I think I'd lose hope for our future. The most infamous oil-state on the planet has recognized that its costly domestic consumption of its vast oil supplies is hurting its profits, and it would rather seek an alternative energy supply to fuel its own nation so that it can sell more oil to foreign investors. The logic here is actually very sound- Saudi Arabia knows that there is money to be made by cutting down their own oil consumption, and even if the world sees how successful they are in their own adoption of solar power as their main source of electricity, most of the West won't be willing to make the same transition when there's so much Saudi oil to buy. Everyone wins- except American consumers, of course. Oh, and the planet- the burning of fossil fuels is a serious problem our generation must tackle if we are to minimize the damages created by man-made global warming. In the short-term, nothing is set in stone, as we have no idea how successful the Saudis will be in their attempt to harvest solar power on such a large scale. However, the implications of this move is huge- I can only imagine what an influx of Saudi oil on the market would do for US gas prices. 

Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why India and Bangladesh have the world's craziest border

Why India and Bangladesh have the world's craziest border | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
On July 31st India and Bangladesh will exchange 162 parcels of land, each of which happens to lie on the wrong side of the Indo-Bangladesh border. The end of these enclaves follows an agreement made between India and Bangladesh on June 6th. The territories along the world’s craziest border include the pièce de résistance of strange geography: the world’s only “counter-counter-enclave”: a patch of India surrounded by Bangladeshi territory, inside an Indian enclave within Bangladesh. How did the enclaves come into existence?The enclaves are invisible on most maps; most are invisible on the ground too. But they became an evident problem for their 50,000-odd inhabitants with the emergence of passport and visa controls. Independent India and Bangladesh—part of Pakistan until 1971—each refused to let the other administer its exclaves, leaving their people effectively stateless.According to Reece Jones, a political geographer, the plots were cut from larger territories by treaties signed in 1711 and 1713 between the maharaja of Cooch Behar and the Mughal emperor in Delhi, bringing to an end a series of minor wars.It was partition, the division of India and Pakistan, that turned the enclaves into a no-man’s-land. The Hindu maharaja of Cooch Behar chose to join India in 1949 and he brought with him the ex-Mughal, ex-British possessions he inherited. Enclaves on the other side of the new border were swallowed (but not digested) by East Pakistan, which later became Bangladesh.


Tags: borders, geopolitics, political, India, South Asia, Bangladesh.


Via Seth Dixon
Stephen Zimmett's insight:
Another great scoop by Seth Dixon
more...
Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:10 AM

The images in the above article truly define how the geography of an area can not last forever. Maps are continuously changing and the border changing of Bangladesh and India is a clear example. In the map giving, we can see that there is an odd circular border forming inside of what seems or should be Bangladesh territory in the upper North of India. Because of the zigging and zagging, the border along these two country is the fifth longest in the world. It is important to understand how and why territories and regions are divided, and also the affects it has for the people in the region. Since establishing a proper border is in the works between the two countries, this will allow  residents in the region, who can now choose which country to join. The overall matter is to provide a more simpler border line without a border battle. 

Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Ring of Fire

Ring of Fire | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
The Ring of Fire is a string of volcanoes and sites of seismic activity, or earthquakes, around the edges of the Pacific Ocean.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 2015 12:20 PM

The Ring of Fire is a series of plate boundaries where earthquakes and volcanic activity are commonplace.  Surrounding the edge of the Pacific Ocean, the Ring of Fire consists of a string of 452 volcanoes.


Tags physical, tectonics, disasters, K12.

Loreto Vargas's curator insight, July 2, 2015 10:07 AM

“El Anillo de Fuego” es una cadena de volcanes y lugares de actividad sísmica, o temblores, alrededor de los límites del Océano Pacífico.

“L’Anneau de Feu” c’est une chaine de volcans et de sites d’activité sismique, ou tremblements de terre, autour de limites de l’Océan Pacifique.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:54 PM

The Ring of Fire is a series of plate boundaries where earthquakes and volcanic activity are commonplace.  Surrounding the edge of the Pacific Ocean, the Ring of Fire consists of a string of 452 volcanoes.

 

Tags: physical, tectonics, disasters, K12.

Rescooped by Stephen Zimmett from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

Vandals destroy dam, release 49 million gallons of water into Bay

Vandals destroy dam, release 49 million gallons of water into Bay | I've started a blog | Scoop.it
Fremont police say vandals attacked an inflatable dam on Alameda Creek that resulted in the loss of nearly 50 million gallons of water.

Via Seth Dixon
Stephen Zimmett's insight:

I saw this on RT the other  day

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 23, 2015 10:11 AM

Because what's more fun than losing nearly 50 millions gallons of freshwater during a drought?  The selfishness of some can be so disheartening for the rest of the community. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 3:12 AM

It is a real shame that people in general would react to the drought this way especially when conditions are extreme. My guess would be that the vandals had a goal not just mess around. Maybe it was a message to the city of Freemont, we will have to see in the future.