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Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories?

Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories? | Education and Training | Scoop.it

This Concept Map, created with IHMC CmapTools, has information related to: Learning Theory v5, Organisation Kolb, Psychology Vygotsky, Psychology Bloom, Piaget genetic epistemology, Psychology Skinner, Montessori constructivism, Dewey...


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Bill Ferguson's curator insight, July 14, 2014 7:56 AM

No wonder there is confusion in education!

Education and Training
How we learn and our strategies to achieve learning
Curated by Bobby Dillard
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Why Believing in Your Students Matters

Why Believing in Your Students Matters | Education and Training | Scoop.it
When I hear statements from educators like: “I have the worst class I’ve had in years,” “These kids can’t do it” or “They don’t want to learn” my heart breaks for the students in their classes and in their schools. I know teaching is complex. The work is hard and seemingly never ending. I will…
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 23, 4:32 PM
I remember a hug and the kind words a junior high teacher shared with me. It makes all the difference. Differences make a difference. This is the currere method informing who we are as teachers and our teaching.
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The Principles of Adult Learning Theory 

The Principles of Adult Learning Theory  | Education and Training | Scoop.it
It has long been understood that adults learn differently from children, and from students of traditional university age. With the recent shift toward continuous education and adult learning, especially in the professional sphere, it has become necessary to quantify these differences more closely.

Instructional design’ is a science-based field that synthesizes pedagogical realities and the neurological facts of learning. Although it can be applied to any learning community, the field has attained widespread recognition due to its role in adult-focused pedagogy.

It builds on and implements existing theories of adult learning in modern, effective ways.

Via Carlos Fosca, Dennis Swender, Ines Bieler
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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, April 17, 9:15 AM

Es bien sabido que los adultos aprendemos de manera diferente que los niños y que incluso los estudiantes universitarios tradicionales. Sin embargo, también es sabido que poco o nada se hace en la mayoría de programas de educación continua para cambiar la estrategia pedagógica del aula universitaria y por ello, una clase para adultos se diferencia poco de una clase tradicional que se ofrece a jóvenes estudiantes de pregrado o incluso de posgrado. La única diferencia radica en que los estudiantes adultos, en este caso, son los que obligan a cambiar la estrategia, cuando introducen preguntas prácticas en clase. El profesor debería planificar su curso y sus clases de una manera diferente, mucho más enfocado a la solución de problemas y a un aprendizaje muy contextualizado, promoviendo el debate y el aprendizaje entre pares. El resto lo ponen los estudiantes que pueden contribuir al aprendizaje de sus compañeros tanto o más que el profesor mismo.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 20, 2:48 PM
"As a general rule, adults need to be involved in planning their instruction and evaluating their results. They should be provided with an environment in which mistakes are safe, expected and a basis for continued learning, in keeping with a problem-centered approach to new ideas."

Those creating and implementing educational policy might want to read this article. Teachers can play a vital role in their own learning.
Margarita Saucedo's curator insight, April 21, 10:51 AM
Andragogía: toma este ámbito de conocimiento
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Peter Senge: How to Overcome Learning Disabilities in Organizations

Peter Senge: How to Overcome Learning Disabilities in Organizations | Education and Training | Scoop.it
As an organization grows, managing the flow demands work items to move from one team/department to another. In quest to make these teams accountable, very specific KPI’s are established and that breeds non-systemic thinking. People look at meeting their own numbers and push the work to next stage
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 17, 2:49 PM
A quick overview of how to overcome not being a learning organization.
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Teaching Strategies

Teaching Strategies | Education and Training | Scoop.it
Facing History offers student-centered teaching strategies that nurture students' literacy and critical thinking skills within a respectful classroom climate. The strategies suggested here can be used with students of all ages with any academic content. See complete list of teaching strategies.

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Chris Carter's curator insight, April 12, 9:15 PM
Student-Centered Teaching Strategies ... Brilliant!!!
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10 work skills for the postnormal era – Work Futures

10 work skills for the postnormal era – Work Futures | Education and Training | Scoop.it
Dion Hinchcliffe tweeted out a graphic (not exactly the one below, but essentially the same) listing skills for 2020 in contrast to 2015 offered up by the World Economic Forum. He got me to thinking…

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 12, 5:17 PM
Normal is normal and is contextual. The ideas of boundless curiousity and being renaissance people appeals to me as a teacher.
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Your Brain on Learning

Your Brain on Learning | Education and Training | Scoop.it
Most trainings fall down because we leave it up to the employee to go back and change their behavior when they go back to an environment that’s already rigged to have them execute the old habit,” she explained. “If they don’t have some intentionality, some chances to develop repetitions of doing it correctly, all the best intentions in the world will fall down.

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David Hain's curator insight, April 12, 2:48 AM

Are you following through on money you are spending on leadership coaching and development? Thats where you get the bangs for your buck!

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 12, 1:26 PM

I also find that many training programs are excellent but when taken back to the job, leaders won't all the new practices to be used. Not it becomes a waste of money.

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, April 13, 3:55 PM
It's about the durable maintenability, or the proficiency of putting into practice the human development (training, coaching, etc.)... I would add four remarks: 

 1. It helps a lot if the leader/manager still before the development shows a genuine interest, even enthusiasm about the development process. Then the participant will know that it is important, he/she should be easier motivated because the workplace is waiting eagerly his/her new or more finetuned skill. 

2. During the training/coaching the facilitator should make it possible that the participants have an as passionate as possible experience, either at the theory as at the practice part. I know, it's not an easy task but without it the money for the development is just thrown out of the window because nobody is learning on purely cognitive basis. If the heart is not there it simply run through without any seeable imprint, if a sort of flow/joy wasn't there, the topics handled are quickly fading...

3. At the end, still during the practice a sort of agreement should be facilitated among the participants (or in case of a personal coaching with the leader/manager and/or with some coworkers) how they exactly will practice in the everyday working relationships what they learned. 

4. After the reinsertion somehow the environment and the participants themselves should be informed and asked for mutual accountability warning in case somebody would fall back into the old habits... 

And you know what? All these are just simple common sense, you do not need for any neuroscience smartness. Of course, it works only if you do it accordingly...
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4 coaching mistakes and how to course-correct

4 coaching mistakes and how to course-correct | Education and Training | Scoop.it
Coaching employees to improve performance can be tricky. Even though your intentions are good, your employees may resist or get defensive. If you get distracted, the conversation goes south without you knowing why. Here are four mistakes leaders make when coaching employees and four course corrections to get it right.
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3 Learning Theories of Instructional Design Infographic - e-Learning Infographics

3 Learning Theories of Instructional Design Infographic - e-Learning Infographics | Education and Training | Scoop.it
The 3 Learning Theories of Instructional Design Infographic helps you understand them and figure out which works well in a learning environment.

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Giving Student Feedback: 20 Tips To Do It Right  

Giving Student Feedback: 20 Tips To Do It Right   | Education and Training | Scoop.it

As teachers, it is essential that we make the process of providing feedback a positive, or at least a neutral, learning experience for the student.

So what exactly is feedback? Feedback is any response from a teacher in regard to a student’s performance or behavior. It can be verbal, written or gestural. The purpose of feedback in the learning process is to improve a student’s performance- definitely not put a damper on it. The ultimate goal of feedback is to provide students with an “I can do this” attitude.


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10 Ways to Make Innovation Real in Your School

10 Ways to Make Innovation Real in Your School | Education and Training | Scoop.it
Building a New Model Together Let's stop fighting change. Instead, let's build on the best practices we've developed over centuries as learners, and embrace next practices that reflect our world. Let's stop fighting the tests. Instead, let's

Via Marta Torán, Sarantis Chelmis, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Chris Carter
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Marta Torán's curator insight, March 24, 3:31 PM

A.J.Juliani nos cuenta 10 maneras de conseguir innovación real en la escuela. Poderosos consejos

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Don’t Leave Learning Up to Chance: Framing and Reflection

Don’t Leave Learning Up to Chance: Framing and Reflection | Education and Training | Scoop.it
When educators take the time to explicitly frame the maker activities and build meaningful reflection in at the end, they're helping to ensure kids are reaching

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How to Increase an Idea's Adoption Rates

How to Increase an Idea's Adoption Rates | Education and Training | Scoop.it
“Daring ideas are like chessmen moved forward. They may be beaten, but they may start a winning game.” [Johann Wolfgang von Goethe] We know from experience that formal leaders influence the behavior of those in their chain of command. CEOs, lead scientists, general managers, and so on. But there's a difference between power and status — some leaders may have status and no power, while others just the opposite. Those who have power and no status may still exercise control over others, as history attests. Without the formal power, status can help us be heard. Enrico Fermi was an Italian physicist at a time when physics wasn't held in high esteem in Italy. The 1938 Nobel Prize winner earned his leadership status through work. His consistent displays of competence, his support of peer scientists across Europe, his sharp intelligence and passion for physics, and some sheer luck, catapulted hi
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How to Learn New Things as an Adult

How to Learn New Things as an Adult | Education and Training | Scoop.it
A new book explores the psychology of mastering skills and absorbing information.
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A Different Approach To Education: This Is How The Japanese Do It

A Different Approach To Education: This Is How The Japanese Do It | Education and Training | Scoop.it
Earlier this month, I set myself on a self-declared journey to research various school systems across the world. My first stop was Finland. The

Via Stephania Savva, Ph.D, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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chanelquantum's comment, Today, 12:41 AM
nice
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Coaching for performance – are you a judge or a facilitator?

Coaching for performance – are you a judge or a facilitator? | Education and Training | Scoop.it
With the pace of business faster than ever, it can be difficult for managers to justify spending hours each month in focused coaching sessions with employees

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Disciplines of a Learning Organization: Peter Senge

Disciplines of a Learning Organization: Peter Senge | Education and Training | Scoop.it
If there is one book that has influenced my business thinking the most, it is Peter Senge’s “The Fifth Discipline – The Art and Practice of Learning Organization” and I have referred to it many times over past years on this blog. Written in 1990, the insights contained in this book are even
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 17, 2:48 PM
Schools by their very definition should be learning organizations, but are not.
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Eight Standards for Putting Skills First in Any Lesson Plan

Eight Standards for Putting Skills First in Any Lesson Plan | Education and Training | Scoop.it

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Adrian Bertolini's curator insight, April 13, 1:46 AM
focusing on skill development, rather than just content acquisition, yields lessons that are both rigorous and engaging.
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The Secret To Learning At The Point-of-Need

The Secret To Learning At The Point-of-Need | Education and Training | Scoop.it
The secret is: ‘Learning’ is rarely (if ever) required at the point-of-need when we're working. Instead, answers, support, insights or guidance are

Via Oliver Durrer, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 12, 5:09 PM
"Point-of-need should be determined by the workers as they face their work challenges to which they require additional confidence and competence to perform a specific action (or set of actions)."

This does not happen with teachers. Someone, other than the teacher, decides what the teacher needs. In my dissertation, I actually wrote that someon-other-than-the-teacher.
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10 ways to make lessons more hands-on

10 ways to make lessons more hands-on | Education and Training | Scoop.it
Many of us want to learn by doing. Our students do, too! Here are some ideas for making learning more hands-on.

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Engage Kids With 7 Times the Effect

Engage Kids With 7 Times the Effect | Education and Training | Scoop.it
The way to engage students is to make sure that they care about the material and know how much you care about them.
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Are Some Teachers Uncoachable?

Are Some Teachers Uncoachable? | Education and Training | Scoop.it

The reality is that most teachers do things that no one else can do. They connect with the unconnected, and they engage the unengaged. They work with the students that come from backgrounds most people can't fathom. Teachers leave a lasting mark on their students. That mark can either be positive or negative. Most work hard to be positive. 



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Receiving Feedback - Six Scary Words That Make Me Sweat

Receiving Feedback - Six Scary Words That Make Me Sweat | Education and Training | Scoop.it
"Would you be open to some feedback?" may be the six scariest words I know. It’s embarrassing to admit what a mess I can be about feedback. I teach this stuff. They’re just words, and so is the feedback that comes with them. For me the problem is one of perspective. No doubt most of the people
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Listening Classes – Tim's Free English Lesson Plans

Listening Classes – Tim's Free English Lesson Plans | Education and Training | Scoop.it
Posts about Listening Classes written by Tim Warre

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Thinking with our Whole Bodies

Thinking with our Whole Bodies | Education and Training | Scoop.it
The the aphorism mens sana in corpore sano (Lat.from Greek philosopher Thales) has come to mean that physical exercise is an important or essential part of mental and psychological well-being. Another way of translating from its ancient Greek origins is a healthy mind in a healthy body. The poet Juvenal used it in a Satire to say that the wise person understands these are the most precious gifts to attend to vs. fame and riches. We spend a lot of time exercising the body, or talking about it, and comparatively little in exercising the mind. The reverse case is also interesting — in Western business culture we spend considerable effort mining the brain and little or none using the body to comprehend, literally grasp. Our bodies have become a transport system for the head. Yet, as any runner would attest, the high endorphin from moving at any pace get
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 9, 6:07 PM
What happens is humans tend to move between the poles of activity and reflection, as if the two are incompatible with each other. They are in fact the poles of a single continuum that we have to move along at various times.
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9 Books Which Made Me an Adult (And 1 You Should Read Anyway)

9 Books Which Made Me an Adult (And 1 You Should Read Anyway) | Education and Training | Scoop.it
I cannot imagine a day where I will feel more pain than that moment. It is the only thing I can’t yet write about. But the only reason I bought her a ring in the first place is because of the top…
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