Education and Training
2.0K views | +0 today
Follow
Education and Training
How we learn and our strategies to achieve learning
Curated by Bobby Dillard
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Dani Shapiro on the Pleasures and Perils of Writing & the Creative Life

Dani Shapiro on the Pleasures and Perils of Writing & the Creative Life | Education and Training | Scoop.it

"It is in the thousands of days of trying, failing, sitting, thinking, resisting, dreaming, raveling, unraveling that we are at our most engaged, alert, alive."


Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, October 22, 2013 9:52 PM

 

There is a mysterious and thought-provoking question; why do people want to write?

 

The answers are as varied as the individual writers themselves. The soul stirs, quickens, when pen is put to paper or fingers fly on the keyboard.

 

The writer's life is greatly romanticized. However, it requires grit. The truth is it can be very lonely. Take heed--if you choose this writer's life--you must drown in it.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2013/10/21/still-writing-dani-shapiro/

 

 

Sarah McElrath's curator insight, October 25, 2013 8:30 AM

So many of these quotes resonated with me. Here's one: "The British author and psychologist Adam Phillips has noted, “When we are inspired, rather like when we are in love, we can feel both unintelligible to ourselves and most truly ourselves.” This is the feeling I think we all yearn for, a kind of hyperreal dream state."

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

The Secrets of How to Write Short | TIME.com

The Secrets of How to Write Short | TIME.com | Education and Training | Scoop.it

"America's writing coach" explains how to artfully write a tweet, epitaph or ransom note."


Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, October 15, 2013 3:41 PM

 

Brevity is beautiful.

 

Short is the new hot.

 

Polish your prose.

 

Land your keyword at the end.

 

Read on for the secrets.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://newsfeed.time.com/2013/08/14/the-secrets-of-how-to-write-short/

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

30 famous authors whose works were rejected (repeatedly, and sometimes rudely) by publishers

30 famous authors whose works were rejected (repeatedly, and sometimes rudely) by publishers | Education and Training | Scoop.it

The revered sage Frank Sinatra once said, "The best revenge is massive success."


Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, October 7, 2013 7:03 PM

 

Have you ever felt the sting of rejection by publishers, family or friends? If so, you are in good company. Reading through some of these rude rejections experienced by 30 famous writers should give you the fortitude you need to keep on writing and publishing.

 

Famous authors such as:

 

George Orwell.  One publisher rejected Mr. Orwell's submission, Animal Farm, with these words:

 

It is impossible to sell animal stories in the USA. 

 

And this one about one of my favorite authors: John Grisham. Mr. Grisham’s first novel, A Time to Kill, was rejected by a dozen publishers and 16 agents before breaking into print and launching Mr. Grisham's best-selling career. 

 

Write on! 

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.examiner.com/article/30-famous-authors-whose-works-were-rejected-repeatedly-and-sometimes-rudely-by-publishers

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

The 5 Biggest Fiction Writing Mistakes (& How to Fix Them) | WritersDigest.com

The 5 Biggest Fiction Writing Mistakes (& How to Fix Them) | WritersDigest.com | Education and Training | Scoop.it
Start your revision by addressing these, and you'll immediately change your story for the better.

Via Carolyn Schriber, Penelope
more...
Jacques Goyette's comment, August 22, 2013 6:59 PM
I believe my writing to be exempt of these mistakes ! Reassuring !
Penelope's comment, August 22, 2013 8:05 PM
Same here! Mine is utterly perfect! ha!
Jacques Goyette's comment, August 22, 2013 9:02 PM
Ah,ah,ah ! That's the spirit !
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

10 Writing Tips From Joyce Carol Oates - Writing Rightly

10 Writing Tips From Joyce Carol Oates - Writing Rightly | Education and Training | Scoop.it
Joyce Carol Oates is one of our favorite writers and writing personalities. A prolific tweeter, the 75 year old today put out 10 pieces of great advice for writing on her Twitter account.

Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, July 19, 2013 2:11 PM

 

What is the old saying? To be successful, follow the advice of successful people. It is easy to search out the advice, but if it is not applied, then it becomes worthless.

 

One of the world's foremost authors, Joyce Carol Oates, dishes out some quick advice via one of my favorite social mediums: Twitter. These top ten countdown tips (ala David Letterman style) are short and actionable enough for anyone to implement.

 

Writers have heard many of them before, but there are some new ones. How about #4? Keep in mind Oscar Wilde: "A little sincerity is a dangerous thing, and a great deal of it is absolutely fatal."

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/18/joyce-carol-oates-writing_n_3617152.html?utm_hp_ref=books

 

 

 

 

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

How To Sell 8 Million Books | Bestseller Labs

How To Sell 8 Million Books | Bestseller Labs | Education and Training | Scoop.it
The method that led author Ray Bradbury from his first $15 short story to selling millions of books.

Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, June 17, 2013 7:49 PM

 

What was the secret of Ray Bradbury's breakthrough; the elusive secret that authors would give their right arm to learn--the one that allowed him to sell 8 million books?

 

He only made a mere $15 for his first paid piece when it was published in the "Super Science Stories" magazine in 1941. But then, the "secret" propelled his work to super stardom. His masterpiece, "Fahrenheit 451" was his 1953 science fiction classic in which he envisaged a world where books were outlawed. It took him only 9 days to write!

 

His secret? Write from your insatiable FASCINATIONS and PERSIST. Very simple but profound advice. Try this yourself and see if your own writing doesn't take flight.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://bestsellerlabs.com/how-to-sell-8-million-books/

 

 

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Take Your Writing From Meh To Memorable With These 12 Simple Techniques - Writing Rightly

Take Your Writing From Meh To Memorable With These 12 Simple Techniques - Writing Rightly | Education and Training | Scoop.it

Are you mesmerized by the beat of the content drum? There's no shortage of advice on how to create "great content."


Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, October 17, 2013 8:04 PM

 

Writers are apprentices. We should continually be working on our craft. Perfect it? Nah. But we can always improve.

 

This wealth-of-tips article was quite a find. The 12 tips are like tiny gold nuggets. If you apply even one,  it should actually take your writing--as it is right now--and color it golden.

 

A few nuggets:

 

o  People love STORIES--don't be afraid to tell one

 

o  Apply a little ALLITERATION - Using the same letter or sound to start multiple words in the same sentence. (EX: Write the way you want)

 

o  Consider CADENCE - Play with syllabication. Just as in music think "rhythm"  (Quick and the Dead)

 

o  Power of THREES - Give examples, adjectives, and sentences in three's (3 little pigs, 3 wishes, etc.)

 

o Longish SENTENCE, then a short one. The short one will sound TRUE.

 

Read through all the tips to pick up some new ideas to add more color to your own writing.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.websearchsocial.com/take-writing-from-meh-to-memorable-with-12-simple-techniques

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

Are You Writing in the POV You Think You’re Writing In? - Marcy Kennedy

Are You Writing in the POV You Think You’re Writing In? - Marcy Kennedy | Education and Training | Scoop.it
By Marcy Kennedy (@MarcyKennedy) Point of view problems are the most common problems I see as a freelance editor. And I’m not surprised. Point of view is a difficult concept to master, yet it’s also the most essential.

Via Lynne Fellows, Penelope, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
Penelope's curator insight, October 11, 2013 7:12 PM

 

Master your point of view (POV) and you have mastered a major part of writing a great story.

 

For those who are new at this lingo, point of view is simply the view from which the story is told. Who's doing the talking? Whose head are you in? POV comes in 4 types:

 

o Second Person - Tells the story using YOU

o Omniscient - Told by an all-knowing narrator

o Third Person - Told from "perspective" of single character

o First Person - The character is telling the story (uses I)

 

For specific examples of each, and further explanations, check out the article in its entirety.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://marcykennedy.com/2013/10/writing-pov-think-youre-writing/

Sarah McElrath's curator insight, October 19, 2013 4:18 PM

Helpful description of POV. 

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

10 Tips For Writing Endings To Your Story - Writing Rightly

10 Tips For Writing Endings To Your Story - Writing Rightly | Education and Training | Scoop.it

"Always keep in mind what is expected in the genre you’re writing. If you’re writing a category romance, then the hero and heroine must unite at the end."


Via Inspire the Muse, Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, August 23, 2013 4:07 PM

 

Writing endings for our stories could be the easiest thing in the world or the hardest. The best way to begin is to ponder on what kind of ending is expected for the genre in which you are writing. If you are writing a category romance, readers are going to expect the love interests to finally get together and have a happy ending. There have been exceptions (Romeo and Juliet or Love Story). If you are a reader anticipating a romantic story and happy ending, do you want to read a tragic ending? I don't.

 

The 10 tips presented should give you a great beginning to write your own ending. Check out the article for all the details.

 

1. Always keep in mind what is EXPECTED in the genre.

2. Avoid the dreaded DEUX EX MACHINE (gods taking care of it).

3. Think APPROPRIATE ending rather than satisfying ending.
4. NO MISERABLE ENDINGS for characters to no real purpose
5. Struggling? Compose an EVENT. Bring most characters together
6. REALLY struggling—go back to the BEGINNING.
7. When the story is over—STOP.
8. BEWARE of TOO MUCH BUILD UP with too quick a resolution.
9. No need to tie up every little plot string, but TIE UP MOST of them
10. EPILOGS: I kind of like them (peek into the future)

 

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://debravega.wordpress.com/2013/08/18/10-tips-for-writing-endings-to-your-story/

 

 

 

Kimberley Vico's curator insight, August 24, 2013 12:40 AM

Like a strong beginning, you ought to have a good ending ~ in any story!  Give it a try...!

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

You’re a Writer! Make it Easy on Yourself

You’re a Writer! Make it Easy on Yourself | Education and Training | Scoop.it
You love writing, the process of developing a story idea, fleshing out the characters, “drawing” the setting with your words and crafting the best story that was ever written. Dreams of top awards dance in your head – hold on right there.

Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, July 22, 2013 7:53 PM

 

Whoa, horsey. Before you start envisioning the writing awards that are going to grace your mantle, start at the beginning. If you have chosen "writing" as your profession of choice, then be a "writer," and write! The more you write, the more prolific you become. That should be a given--unless you are meant to be in some other profession. 

 

In any type of business, the company will usually send you to classes to learn different aspects of your job and improve your skills. When I worked for a major computer company, I had to stay over in Chicago for two entire weeks to learn about all the ins and outs of computer hardware. Yawn. Not my strong suit, to be sure, but it was important to my career, nonetheless.

 

Find ways to improve your craft. My Kindle is currently full of "how to" books on creating characters, plotting or writing faster. I just read a fantastic book called "2K-10K," where the author kept meticulous records of when and how many words she wrote, and came up with a simple, but profound method for increasing her output. It opened my eyes.

 

Another easy tip? I just interviewed an award-winning children's author who found a method that worked for her to zoom her writing along. Whenever she hit a snag, and wasn't sure what to write, she filled it up with XXXXXXX's and came back to fill in later. Ingenius!

 

Find your own writing shortcuts, implement them, and those awards will be gracing your mantle before you know it.

 

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://authormingle.com/writing-tips-and-techniques/youre-a-writer-make-it-easy-on-yourself/

Sharilee Swaity's curator insight, July 22, 2013 8:20 PM

some warm encouraging advice for getting past those writer's block blues ... with quotes from Hemingway.

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

How Writing Regularly Changed My Life (and How You Can Get Started)

How Writing Regularly Changed My Life (and How You Can Get Started) | Education and Training | Scoop.it

I'm not going to tell you that you should write every single day, nor am I going to list out reasons that would make my arguments general enough for everyone."


Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, July 15, 2013 9:29 PM

 

This author makes the case for writing every day and I have to agree with him. Some of the ways that writing can help us:

 

o Writing Helps with RECALL - Remember inportant details

o Writing Keeps Me IN CHECK - Manage your feelings

o Writing Helps Me Share My THOUGHTS - Just get it out!

o Writing Helps Me COMMUNICATE in Life - Become more eloquent

o Writing is REWARDING - Satisfcation from finishing something

 

However, where we part ways in the "how" of the writing. He found that he wrote better and more easily with an app called "Day One" http://dayoneapp.com for the iphone. I personally still like my trusty journal and the feel of the pen to the page. There is no one way to write--just do what feels right to you!

 

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://lifehacker.com/how-writing-regularly-changed-my-life-and-how-you-can-746865755

 

 

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

5 Common Mistakes that Will KILL Your Novel

5 Common Mistakes that Will KILL Your Novel | Education and Training | Scoop.it

Even literary fiction involves some outside force that is causing the contemplation, depression, rebellion, etc...


Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, May 31, 2013 3:47 PM

 

Some interesting points to keep in mind to keep your readers reading. You don't want them to become bored, so each scene needs to move the plot forward. If it starts dragging, so does the reader.  Keep these points close by when writing. These are 5 common problems to new writers of fiction:

 

#1 No Core Antagonist (No BBT)— creates a "soap opera effect"

#2 Antagonist is a Caricature—leave the mustache twirlers to cartoons

#3 Antagonist is Weak—should present BIG stakes for protagonist

#4 Not Enough Scene Antagonists—in other words, more than one

#5 No Scene Antagonist—every scene must have dramatic tension

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://warriorwriters.wordpress.com/2013/03/19/5-common-mistakes-that-will-kill-your-novel/