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How we learn and our strategies to achieve learning
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5 Assessment Forms That Promote Content Retention

5 Assessment Forms That Promote Content Retention | Education and Training | Scoop.it
If we hope to construct enduring understanding in our students, it's critical that, now more than ever, we know their strengths and interests. By incorporating students' strengths and weakness into a

Via Beth Dichter, Cindy Riley Klages
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 22, 2014 6:24 PM

As teachers today we are told that we must teach our students and help them construct "enduring understanding", providing them with the ability to transfer knowledge from one subject area to another subject area. We are also told that we should personalize education, requiring us to know the strengths and weaknesses and incorporate this into our lessons. And let's not forget that we must also assess our students. How can we make our assessments help students with content retention? This post focuses on this question, and provides five suggestions on ways to do this.

The first three suggestions are:

  • Tests Where Notes or Textbooks are Permitted
  • Take-Home Tests
  • Student-Made Tests

These types of tests may take more time to create but they have the ability to be written so that students have to do more than memorize information. There is more information on this in the post.

The next suggestion is:

  • Projects Pre-Approved by the Teacher

This requires that students demonstrate mastery of the subject. This will require the student to create (a 21st century goal) and additional information is in the post, including a discussion of what this might look like.

The final suggestion is:

    • Revisions and Retests to Build Skillsets

    This section discusses what we may do to help out student build their skillsets through feedback and opportunities to construct accurate information.

    As you read this post you may begin to consider alternative ways to assess your students that help them with content retention.

    Kathy Lynch's curator insight, March 23, 2014 1:25 PM

    Ideas to expand thinking on current assessments, particularly for those who do not test well. Thx Beth Dichter!

    Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, March 24, 2014 1:46 PM

    As teachers today we are told that we must teach our students and help them construct "enduring understanding", providing them with the ability to transfer knowledge from one subject area to another subject area. We are also told that we should personalize education, requiring us to know the strengths and weaknesses and incorporate this into our lessons. And let's not forget that we must also assess our students. How can we make our assessments help students with content retention? This post focuses on this question, and provides five suggestions on ways to do this.

    The first three suggestions are:

    Tests Where Notes or Textbooks are PermittedTake-Home TestsStudent-Made Tests

    These types of tests may take more time to create but they have the ability to be written so that students have to do more than memorize information. There is more information on this in the post.

    The next suggestion is:

    Projects Pre-Approved by the Teacher

    This requires that students demonstrate mastery of the subject. This will require the student to create (a 21st century goal) and additional information is in the post, including a discussion of what this might look like.

    The final suggestion is:

    Revisions and Retests to Build Skillsets

    This section discusses what we may do to help out student build their skillsets through feedback and opportunities to construct accurate information.

    As you read this post you may begin to consider alternative ways to assess your students that help them with content retention.

    Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
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    Training the Brain to Listen: A Practical Strategy for Student Learning and Classroom Management

    Training the Brain to Listen: A Practical Strategy for Student Learning and Classroom Management | Education and Training | Scoop.it

    Editor's note: This post is co-authored by Marcus Conyers who, with Donna Wilson, is co-developer of the M.S. and Ed.S. Brain-Based Teaching degree programs at Nova Southeastern University. 

     

    During the school year, students are expected to listen to and absorb vast amounts of content. But how much time has been devoted to equipping students with ways to disconnect from their own internal dialogue (self-talk) and to focus their attention fully on academic content that is being presented? Listening is hard work even for adults. When students are unable to listen effectively, classroom management issues arise.


    Via Elizabeth E Charles, Lynnette Van Dyke
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    Sue Gaardboe's curator insight, January 24, 2014 3:32 AM

    Teaching the difference between hearing (acknowledging there is a noise but not necessarily engaging the brain to understand the sound) and listening (consciously trying to make sense of the sound) would be a good first step too. 

    Funda Sahillioglu's curator insight, January 24, 2014 11:58 AM

    listening plays grat importance in classroom management

    Ness Crouch's curator insight, January 25, 2014 2:58 PM

    Interesting insights. Worth a read.