I Shall Sing
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Videos for Selected Celebrations, Commemorations & Other Observances - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_historical_anniversaries
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Philip K. Dick ~ 16 December 1928 – 2 March 1982 ~ "Blade Runner" (Vangelis Soundtrack)

Video homenaje a la Banda Sonora Original de la película "Blade Runner", compuesta por Vangelis en 1982. Mucho me he pensado la mejor manera de editar la que...

Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American novelist, short story writer and essayist whose published work is almost entirely in the science fiction genre. Dick explored sociological, political and metaphysical themes in novels dominated by monopolistic corporations, authoritarian governments, and altered states. In his later works Dick's thematic focus strongly reflected his personal interest in metaphysics and theology. He often drew upon his own life experiences in addressing the nature of drug abuse, paranoia, schizophrenia, and transcendental experiences in novels such as A Scanner Darkly and VALIS.

The novel The Man in the High Castle bridged the genres of alternate history and science fiction, earning Dick a Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1963. Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said, a novel about a celebrity who awakens in a parallel universe where he is unknown, won the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for best novel in 1975. "I want to write about people I love, and put them into a fictional world spun out of my own mind, not the world we actually have, because the world we actually have does not meet my standards," Dick wrote of these stories. "In my writing I even question the universe; I wonder out loud if it is real, and I wonder out loud if all of us are real."

In addition to 44 published novels, Dick wrote approximately 121 short stories, most of which appeared in science fiction magazines during his lifetime. Although Dick spent most of his career as a writer in near-poverty, ten popular films based on his works have been produced, including Blade Runner, Total Recall, A Scanner Darkly, Minority Report, Paycheck, Next, Screamers, and The Adjustment Bureau. In 2005, Time magazine named Ubik one of the one hundred greatest English-language novels published since 1923. In 2007, Dick became the first science fiction writer to be included in The Library of America series.__ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_K._Dick

__ http://www.philipkdick.com/
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Ludwig van Beethoven ~ 16 December 1770 – 26 March 1827 ~ "Argument to Beethoven's 5th" (Sid Caesar & Nannette Fabray)

Ludwig van Beethoven ([16] December 1770 – 26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist. A crucial figure in the transition between the Classical and Romantic eras in Western art music, he remains one of the most famous and influential of all composers. His best known compositions include 9 symphonies, 5 concertos for piano, 32 piano sonatas, and 16 string quartets. He also composed other chamber music, choral works (including the celebrated Missa Solemnis), and songs.

Born in Bonn, then the capital of the Electorate of Cologne and part of the Holy Roman Empire, Beethoven displayed his musical talents at an early age and was taught by his father Johann van Beethoven and Christian Gottlob Neefe. During his first 22 years in Bonn, Beethoven intended to study with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and befriended Joseph Haydn. Beethoven moved to Vienna in 1792 and began studying with Haydn, quickly gaining a reputation as a virtuoso pianist. He lived in Vienna until his death. During the late 18th century, his hearing began to deteriorate significantly, yet he continued to compose, conduct, and perform after becoming completely deaf.

Beethoven was born of this marriage in Bonn. There is no authentic record of the date of his birth; however, the registry of his baptism, in a Roman Catholic service at the Parish of St. Regius on 17 December 1770, survives. As children of that era were traditionally baptised the day after birth in the Catholic Rhine country, and it is known that Beethoven's family and his teacher Johann Albrechtsberger celebrated his birthday on 16 December, most scholars accept 16 December 1770 as Beethoven's date of birth. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludwig_van_Beethoven

__ http://imslp.org/wiki/Category:Beethoven,_Ludwig_van
__ http://www3.cpdl.org/wiki/index.php/Ludwig_van_Beethoven

__ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Your_Show_of_Shows
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Happy Birthday, Taylor Swift! 13 December 1989 ~ "Begin Again"

Music video by Taylor Swift performing Begin Again (Live from New York City). © 2012 Big Machine Records, LLC

Taylor Alison Swift (born December 13, 1989) is an American singer-songwriter. Raised in Wyomissing, Pennsylvania, Swift moved to Nashville, Tennessee at the age of fourteen to pursue a career in country music. She signed to the independent label Big Machine Records and became the youngest songwriter ever hired by the Sony/ATV Music publishing house. The release of Swift's eponymous debut album in 2006 established her as a country music star. "Our Song", her third single, made her the youngest person to single-handedly write and perform a number one song on the country chart. She received a Best New Artist nomination at the 2008 Grammy Awards.

Swift's second album, Fearless, was released in 2008. Buoyed by the crossover success of the singles "Love Story" and "You Belong with Me", Fearless became the top-selling album of 2009 and was supported by an extensive concert tour. The record won four Grammy Awards, with Swift becoming the youngest ever Album of the Year winner. Swift's third album, 2010's Speak Now, sold over one million copies in its first week of US release and was supported by the thirteen-month Speak Now World Tour. The album's third single, "Mean", won two Grammy Awards. Swift's fourth album, Red, was released in 2012. Its opening US sales of 1.21 million were the highest recorded in a decade, with Swift becoming the only female artist to have two million-plus opening weeks. The lead single, "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together", was Swift's first number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and became a worldwide hit. The Red Tour is scheduled to begin in March 2013.

Swift is known for her hook-laden, narrative songs about her experiences as a teenager and young adult. As a songwriter, she has been honored by the Nashville Songwriters Association and the Songwriters Hall of Fame. Swift's other achievements include six Grammy Awards, eleven American Music Awards, seven Country Music Association Awards, six Academy of Country Music Awards and thirteen BMI Awards. She has sold over 26 million albums and 70 million song downloads worldwide. In addition to her music career, Swift has appeared as an actress in the crime drama CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (2009), the ensemble comedy Valentine's Day (2010) and the animated film The Lorax (2012). Forbes estimates that she is worth over $165 million. As a philanthropist, Swift supports arts education, children's literacy, natural disaster relief, LGBT rights, and charities for sick children. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taylor_Swift

__ http://www.taylorswift.com/
__ https://twitter.com/taylorswift13
__ https://www.facebook.com/TaylorSwift
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Emily Dickinson ~ 10 December 1830 - 15 May 1886 ~ "This Is My Letter to the World"; "Dying" (read by Lee Remick)

Here, actress Lee Remick reads two of Emily Dickinson's poems, "This is my letter to the world" and "Dying." To learn more about "Six Centuries of Verse" or ...

 

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson (December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886) was an American poet. Born in Amherst, Massachusetts, to a successful family with strong community ties, she lived a mostly introverted and reclusive life. After she studied at the Amherst Academy for seven years in her youth, she spent a short time at Mount Holyoke Female Seminarybefore returning to her family's house in Amherst. Thought of as an eccentric by the locals, she became known for her penchant for white clothing and her reluctance to greet guests or, later in life, even leave her room. Most of her friendships were therefore carried out by correspondence.

 

While Dickinson was a prolific private poet, fewer than a dozen of her nearly eighteen hundred poems were published during her lifetime. The work that was published during her lifetime was usually altered significantly by the publishers to fit the conventional poetic rules of the time. Dickinson's poems are unique for the era in which she wrote; they contain short lines, typically lack titles, and often use slant rhyme as well as unconventional capitalization and punctuation. Many of her poems deal with themes of death and immortality, two recurring topics in letters to her friends.

 

Although most of her acquaintances were probably aware of Dickinson's writing, it was not until after her death in 1886—when Lavinia, Emily's younger sister, discovered her cache of poems—that the breadth of Dickinson's work became apparent. Her first collection of poetry was published in 1890 by personal acquaintances Thomas Wentworth Higginson and Mabel Loomis Todd, both of whom heavily edited the content. A complete and mostly unaltered collection of her poetry became available for the first time in 1955 when The Poems of Emily Dickinson was published by scholar Thomas H. Johnson. Despite unfavorable reviews and skepticism of her literary prowess during the late 19th and early 20th century, critics now consider Dickinson to be a major American poet __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emily_Dickinson

 

__ http://www.emilydickinson.org/
__ http://www.emilydickinsoninternationalsociety.org/
__ http://www.emilydickinsonmuseum.org/
__ http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/emily-dickinson

 

 

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10 December: Human Rights Day ~ "The Universal Declaration of Human Rights II"

The Human Rights Action Center presents the 30 articles of The Universal Declaration of Human Rights read aloud by artists, advocates and children in support...

 

Human Rights Day is celebrated annually across the world on 10 December.

 

The date was chosen to honor the United Nations General Assembly's adoption and proclamation, on 10 December 1948, of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), the first global enunciation of human rights and one of the first major achievements of the new United Nations. The formal establishment of Human Rights Day occurred at the 317th Plenary Meeting of the General Assembly on 4 December 1950, when the General Assembly declared resolution 423(V), inviting all member states and any other interested organizations to celebrate the day as they saw fit. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_Rights_Day

 

__ http://www.un.org/events/humanrights/

 

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a declaration adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 10 December 1948 at Palais de Chaillot, Paris. The Declaration arose directly from the experience of the Second World War and represents the first global expression of rights to which all human beings are inherently entitled. It consists of 30 articles which have been elaborated in subsequent international treaties, regional human rights instruments, national constitutions and laws. The International Bill of Human Rights consists of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and its two Optional Protocols. In 1966 the General Assembly adopted the two detailed Covenants, which complete the International Bill of Human Rights; and in 1976, after the Covenants had been ratified by a sufficient number of individual nations, the Bill took on the force of international law. [...]

 

Criticism

 

Most Muslim countries have signed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other human rights agreements. In 1948, Saudi Arabia did not sign the declaration, arguing it violated Islamic law. However, Pakistan (which had signed the declaration) criticized the Saudi position. In 1982, the Iranian representative to the United Nations, Said Rajaie-Khorassani, said that the UDHR was "a secular understanding of the Judeo-Christian tradition", which could not be implemented by Muslims without trespassing the Islamic law. On 30 June 2000, Muslim nations that are members of the Organisation of the Islamic Conference (now the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation) officially resolved to support the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam, an alternative document that says people have "freedom and right to a dignified life in accordance with the Islamic Shari’ah", without any discrimination on grounds of "race, colour, language, sex, religious belief, political affiliation, social status or other considerations". As a secular state, Turkey has signed the declaration of Human Rights in 1948 and other European Human Rights agreements.

 

A number of scholars in different fields have expressed concerns with the Declaration's western bias. These include Irene Oh (Religion and Ethics), Abdulaziz Sachedina (Religion), Riffat Hassan (Theology) and Faisal Kutty (Law). Riffat Hassan argues as follows:

 

"What needs to be pointed out to those who uphold the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to be the highest, or sole, model, of a charter of equality and liberty for all human beings, is that given the Western origin and orientation of this Declaration, the "universality" of the assumptions on which it is based is - at the very least - problematic and subject to questioning. Furthermore, the alleged incompatibility between the concept of human rights and religion in general, or particular religions such as Islam, needs to be examined in an unbiased way."

 

Irene Oh argues that one of the ways to reconcile the two is the approach it from the perspective of comparative ethics.

Kutty writes: "A strong argument can be made that the current formulation of international human rights constitutes a cultural structure in which western society finds itself easily at home ... It is important to acknowledge and appreciate that other societies may have equally valid alternative conceptions of human rights."

 

The Right to Refuse to Kill

 

Groups such as Amnesty International and War Resisters International have advocated for "The Right to Refuse to Kill" to be added to the UDHR. War Resisters International has stated that the right to conscientious objection to military service is primarily derived from, but not yet explicit in, Article 18 the UDHR: the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion.

 

Steps have been taken within the United Nations to make this right more explicit; but those steps have been limited to secondary, more "marginal" United Nations documents. That is why Amnesty International would like to have this right brought "out of the margins" and explicitly into the primary document, namely the UDHR itself.

 

To the rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights one more might, with relevance, be added. It is "The Right to Refuse to Kill."

— Assistant Secretary General of the United Nations, and Nobel Peace Laureate, Sean MacBride, 1974 Nobel Lecture

__ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Declaration_of_Human_Rights

 

Full text of the UDHR http://www.un.org/Overview/rights.html

 

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Happy Birthday, Joshua Bell! 9 December 1967 ~ "Beethoven Violin Concerto in D Major"

'Dolby AAC' Ludwig van Beethoven: Violin Concerto- 1 Joshua Bell, violin note:enjoy wirh headphone...

 

Joshua David Bell (born December 9, 1967) is an American Grammy Award-winning violinist.

 

Bell was born in Bloomington, Indiana, United States, the son of a psychologist and a therapist. Bell's parents were Shirley and Alan P. Bell, Professor Emeritus of Indiana University, in Bloomington, and a former Kinsey researcher. His father is of Scottish descent, and his mother is Jewish (his maternal grandfather was born in Israel and his maternal grandmother was from Minsk). Bell told The Jewish Journal, "I identify myself as being Jewish".

 

Bell began taking violin lessons at the age of four after his mother discovered that her son had taken rubber bands from around the house and stretched them across the handles of his dresser drawer to pluck out music he had heard her play on the piano. His parents got a scaled-to-size violin for their then five-year-old son and started giving him lessons. A bright student, Bell took to the instrument but lived an otherwise normal midwest Indiana life playing video games and excelling at sports, namely tennis and bowling, even placing in a national tennis tournament at the age of ten.

 

Bell made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1985, at age 17, with the St. Louis Symphony. He has since performed with many of the world's major orchestras and conductors. As well as the standard concerto repertoire, Bell has performed new works. Nicholas Maw's violin concerto is dedicated to Bell, who premiered it in 1993 and won a Grammy Award for his recording of the piece. He performed the solo part on John Corigliano's Oscar-winning soundtrack for the film The Red Violin and was also featured in Ladies in Lavender. Bell made an appearance in the movie Music of the Heart, a story about the power of music, with other notable violinists. [...]

 

In an experiment initiated by The Washington Post columnist Gene Weingarten, Bell donned a baseball cap and played as an incognito busker at the Metro subway station L'Enfant Plaza in Washington, D.C. on January 12, 2007. The experiment was videotaped on hidden camera; of the 1,097 people who passed by, only seven stopped to listen to him, and only one recognized him. For his nearly 45-minute performance, Bell collected $32.17 from 27 passersby (excluding $20 from the passerby who recognized him). The night before, he earned considerably more playing the same repertoire at a concert. Weingarten won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing for his article on the experiment. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joshua_Bell

 

__ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Violin_Concerto_%28Beethoven%29

 

__ http://www.joshuabell.com/

 

"Pearls Before Breakfast Can one of the nation's great musicians cut through the fog of a D.C. rush hour? Let's find out." By Gene Weingarten, Washington Post Staff Writer; Sunday, April 8, 2007
__ http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/04/AR2007040401721.html

 

 

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Happy Birthday, Sinéad O'Connor! 8 December 1966 ~ "Mother"

The Wall Live in Berlin Concert Performing Mother with Sinead O'Connor at the Wall concert in Berlin...

 

Sinéad Marie Bernadette O'Connor (born 8 December 1966) is an Irish singer-songwriter who rose to fame in the late 1980s with her debut album The Lion and the Cobra. O'Connor achieved worldwide success in 1990 with a cover of Prince's song "Nothing Compares 2 U".

 

Since then, while maintaining her singing career, she has occasionally encountered controversy, partly due to her statements and gestures - such as her ordination as a priest despite being a woman with a Roman Catholic background - and her strongly expressed views on organised religion, women's rights, war, and child abuse.

 

In addition to her nine solo albums her work includes many singles, songs for films, collaborations with many other artists and appearances at charity fundraising concerts. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sin%C3%A9ad_O%27Connor

 

__ http://www.sineadoconnor.com/

__ http://www.facebook.com/pages/Sinead-OConnor/246972478675081

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Happy Birthday, Sinéad O'Connor! 8 December 1966 ~ "Raglan Road"

 

Sinead O'Connor Raglan Road from Late Late Show Donal Lunny Tribute...

 

Sinéad Marie Bernadette O'Connor (born 8 December 1966) is an Irish singer-songwriter who rose to fame in the late 1980s with her debut album The Lion and the Cobra. O'Connor achieved worldwide success in 1990 with a cover of Prince's song "Nothing Compares 2 U".

 

Since then, while maintaining her singing career, she has occasionally encountered controversy, partly due to her statements and gestures - such as her ordination as a priest despite being a woman with a Roman Catholic background - and her strongly expressed views on organised religion, women's rights, war, and child abuse.

 

In addition to her nine solo albums her work includes many singles, songs for films, collaborations with many other artists and appearances at charity fundraising concerts. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sin%C3%A9ad_O%27Connor

 

__ http://www.sineadoconnor.com/

__ http://www.facebook.com/pages/Sinead-OConnor/246972478675081

 

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Happy Birthday, Jean Ritchie! 8 December 1922 ~ "Blackwaters"

Jean Ritchie (born December 8, 1922) is an American folk music singer, songwriter, and Appalachian dulcimer player. Abigail and Balis Ritchie of Viper, Kentucky had 14 children, and Jean was the youngest. Ten girls slept in one room of the farming family's house in the Cumberland Mountains.

 

Jean Ritchie quickly memorized songs and performed at local dances and the county fairs with Chalmers and Velma NcDaniels ( who grew up with her in Viper) ,where they repeated ly won blue ribbons Hazard. In the late 1940s the family acquired a radio and discovered that what they were singing was hillbilly music, a word they had never heard before. In the mid-thirties Alan Lomax recorded in Kentucky for the Library of Congress's Archive of Folk Song. Among the people he recorded were The Singing Ritchies.

 

Ritchie attended Cumberland College (Now the University of the Cumberlands) in Williamsburg, Kentucky and later the University of Kentucky in Lexington. At college she joined the glee club and choir and learned to play piano. In 1946 she graduated with a BA in social work. During the war, she taught in elementary school. [...]

 

Ritchie became known as "The Mother of Folk". As well as work songs and ballads, Ritchie knew hymns from the "Old Regular Baptist" church she attended in Jeff, Kentucky. These were sung as "lining out" songs, in a lingering soulful way. One of the songs they sang was "Amazing Grace". She wrote some songs, including one on the effects of strip mining in Kentucky. (Some of Ritchie's late 1950s/early 1960s songs on mining she published under the pseudonym "'Than Hall" to avoid troubling her non-political mother, and believing they might be better received if attributed to a man.)

 

"My Dear Companion" appeared on the album Trio recorded by Linda Ronstadt, Dolly Parton, and Emmylou Harris. Judy Collins not only recorded some of Ritchie's traditional songs, "Tender Ladies" and "Pretty Saro", but used a photograph by George Pickow on the front of her album Golden Apples of the Sun (1962).  [...]

 

Ritchie has performed at Carnegie Hall and at the Royal Albert Hall. Her album, None But One, was awarded the Rolling Stone Critics award in 1977.

 

In 2002, Ritchie received a National Endowment For The Arts National Heritage Fellowship, the Nation's highest honor in the folk and traditional arts. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Ritchie

 

Jean Ritchie sole guest on Wood Songs #159 (2000) __ http://128.163.130.14/woodsongs-159.wmv

 

 

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Happy Birthday, Sara Bareilles! 7 December 1979 ~ 'Yellow'

Sara Beth Bareilles (born December 7, 1979) is an American singer-songwriter and pianist. She achieved mainstream success in 2007 with the hit single "Love Song", which brought her into the number one spot on the Billboard Pop 100 chart. She has sold over 1 million records and over 4 million singles in the United States alone and has been nominated for a Grammy Award three times. In the third season of NBC's The Sing-Off, Bareilles was a celebrity judge alongside Ben Folds and Shawn Stockman of Boyz II Men. In February 2012, VH1 placed Bareilles in the #80 spot of the Top 100 Greatest Women in Music. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sara_Bareilles

 

__ http://www.sarabmusic.com/

__ https://twitter.com/SaraBareilles

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Jean Carignan ~ 7 December 1916 - 16 February 1988 ~ "Crowley's Reel"

Jean Carignan plays Crowley's Reel for NFB Film...

 

Jean Carignan, CM (December 7, 1916 – February 16, 1988) was a Canadian fiddler.

 

Born in Lévis, Québec on December 7, 1916. He was a well-known fiddler from Quebec. Joseph Allard, Michael Coleman, and J. Scott Skinner are all brilliant traditional fiddlers whose music Carignan studied. Carignan was a friend of famous violinist and conductor Yehudi Menuhin. In 1974, he was made a Member of the Order of Canada as "the greatest fiddler in North America".[1] He died in Montreal on February 16, 1988 at the age of 71.

 

In 1976, The Folk Music Sourcebook wrote about Carignan : Carignan's technique is amazing, but more so the joy and energy with which he applies it. There are few players in any music who reach his degree of virtuosity without sacrificing feeling or originality'. As a fiddler, he was always aiming for the strictest authenticity in his executions, displaying an attitude of absolute rigor when playing his repertoire of 7000 pieces learned from Coleman, Skinner, Allard, Wellie Ringuette and many others. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Carignan

 

__ http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/articles/emc/jean-carignan

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Dave Brubeck ~ 6 December 1920 - 5 December 2012 ~ "Blue Rondo à la Turk" (ORF-Supercussion)

Performed 11.4.1984 in Vienna by ORF-Supercussion.

 

David Warren "Dave" Brubeck (December 6, 1920 – December 5, 2012) was an American jazz pianist and composer, considered to be one of the foremost exponents of progressive jazz. He wrote a number of jazz standards, including "In Your Own Sweet Way" and "The Duke". Brubeck's style ranged from refined to bombastic, reflecting his mother's attempts at classical training and his improvisational skills. His music is known for employing unusual time signatures, and superimposing contrasting rhythms, meters, and tonalities.

 

His long-time musical partner, alto saxophonist Paul Desmond, wrote the saxophone melody for the Dave Brubeck Quartet's best remembered piece, "Take Five", which is in 5/4 time and has endured as a jazz classic on one of the top-selling jazz albums, Time Out. Brubeck experimented with time signatures throughout his career, recording "Pick Up Sticks" in 6/4, "Unsquare Dance" in 7/4, "World's Fair" in 13/4, and "Blue Rondo à la Turk" in 9/8. He was also a respected composer of orchestral and sacred music, and wrote soundtracks for television such as Mr. Broadway and the animated mini-series This Is America, Charlie Brown. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Brubeck

 

__ http://www.davebrubeck.com/

__ http://www.pacific.edu/Community/Centers-Clinics-and-Institutes/Brubeck-Institute.html

 

__ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Rondo_%C3%A0_la_Turk

__ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_Out_%28album%29

 

__ http://www.pbs.org/brubeck/

__ http://www.npr.org/blogs/therecord/2012/12/05/166571712/remembering-the-vital-force-of-jazz-pianist-dave-brubeck

__ http://www.npr.org/2010/12/03/131731507/celebrating-jazz-pianist-dave-brubeck-s-90th-birthday

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Dave Brubeck ~ 6 December 1920 - 5 December 2012 ~ "Blue Rondo à la Turk" (Saxofollia)

http://www.myspace.com/saxofolliaproject Massimo Ferraguti sax soprano Fabrizio Benevelli sax alto Marco Ferri sax tenore Alessandro Creola sax baritono Live...

 

David Warren "Dave" Brubeck (December 6, 1920 – December 5, 2012) was an American jazz pianist and composer, considered to be one of the foremost exponents of progressive jazz. He wrote a number of jazz standards, including "In Your Own Sweet Way" and "The Duke". Brubeck's style ranged from refined to bombastic, reflecting his mother's attempts at classical training and his improvisational skills. His music is known for employing unusual time signatures, and superimposing contrasting rhythms, meters, and tonalities.

 

His long-time musical partner, alto saxophonist Paul Desmond, wrote the saxophone melody for the Dave Brubeck Quartet's best remembered piece, "Take Five", which is in 5/4 time and has endured as a jazz classic on one of the top-selling jazz albums, Time Out. Brubeck experimented with time signatures throughout his career, recording "Pick Up Sticks" in 6/4, "Unsquare Dance" in 7/4, "World's Fair" in 13/4, and "Blue Rondo à la Turk" in 9/8. He was also a respected composer of orchestral and sacred music, and wrote soundtracks for television such as Mr. Broadway and the animated mini-series This Is America, Charlie Brown. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Brubeck

 

__ http://www.davebrubeck.com/

__ http://www.pacific.edu/Community/Centers-Clinics-and-Institutes/Brubeck-Institute.html

 

__ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Rondo_%C3%A0_la_Turk

__ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_Out_%28album%29

 

__ http://www.pbs.org/brubeck/

__ http://www.npr.org/blogs/therecord/2012/12/05/166571712/remembering-the-vital-force-of-jazz-pianist-dave-brubeck

__ http://www.npr.org/2010/12/03/131731507/celebrating-jazz-pianist-dave-brubeck-s-90th-birthday

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Arthur C. Clarke ~ 16 December 1917 – 19 March 2008 ~ "2001: A Space Odyssey - The Monolith On The Moon"

"If you will pardon so commonplace a simile, we have set off the fire-alarm and have nothing to do but to wait. I do not think we will have to wait for long." Arthur C. Clarke; The Sentinel

Sir Arthur Charles Clarke, CBE, FRAS, Sri Lankabhimanya, (16 December 1917 – 19 March 2008) was a British science fiction author, inventor, and futurist, famous for his short stories and novels, among them 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), and as a host and commentator in the British television series Mysterious World. For many years, Robert A. Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, and Clarke were known as the "Big Three" of science fiction.

Clarke served in the Royal Air Force as a radar instructor and technician from 1941 to 1946. In 1945, he proposed a satellite communication system—an idea that, in 1963, won him the Franklin Institute's Stuart Ballantine Medal. He was the chairman of the British Interplanetary Society from 1947–1950 and again in 1953.

In 1956, Clarke emigrated to Sri Lanka, largely to pursue his interest in scuba diving. That year, he discovered the underwater ruins of the ancient Koneswaram temple in Trincomalee. He lived in Sri Lanka until his death. He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1998,] and was awarded Sri Lanka's highest civil honour, Sri Lankabhimanya, in 2005.__ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_C._Clarke

__ http://www.clarkefoundation.org/
__ Clark's 31-word short story http://www.lettersofnote.com/2011/02/siseneg.html
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"Song for Dead Children" ~ Muriel Rukeyser ~ 15 December 1913 - 12 February 1980

"Song for Dead Children" ~ Muriel  Rukeyser   ~ 15 December 1913 - 12 February 1980 | I Shall Sing | Scoop.it
Song for Dead Children", by Muriel Rukeyser

We set great wreaths of brightness on the graves of the passionate
who required tribute of hot July flowers—
for you, O brittle-hearted, we bring offering
remembering how your wrists were thin and your delicate bones
not yet braced for conquering.

The sharp cries of ghost-boys are keen above the meadows,
and little girls continue graceful and wondering.
Flickering evening on the lakes recalls those young
heirs whose developing years have sunk to earth,
their strength not tested, their praise unsung.

Weave grasses for their childhood—who will never see
love or disaster or take sides against decay
balancing the choices of maturity.
Silent and coffined in silence while we pass
loud in defiance of death, the helpless lie.

October 1935

Muriel Rukeyser (December 15, 1913 – February 12, 1980) was an American poet and political activist, best known for her poems about equality, feminism, social justice, and Judaism. Kenneth Rexroth said that she was the greatest poet of her "exact generation".

One of her most powerful pieces was a group of poems entitled The Book of the Dead (1938), documenting the details of the Hawk's Nest incident, an industrial disaster in which hundreds of miners died of silicosis.

Her poem "To be a Jew in the Twentieth Century" (1944), on the theme of Judaism as a gift, was adopted by the American Reform and Reconstructionist movements for their prayer books, something Rukeyser said "astonished" her, as she had remained distant from Judaism throughout her early life. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muriel_Rukeyser
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Frank Sinatra ~ 12 December 1915 - 14 May 1998 ~ "One For My Baby"

Francis Albert "Frank" Sinatra, (December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998) was an American singer and film actor of Italian origin.

Beginning his musical career in the swing era with Harry James and Tommy Dorsey, Sinatra found unprecedented success as a solo artist from the early to mid-1940s after being signed to Columbia Records in 1943. Being the idol of the "bobby soxers", he released his first album, The Voice of Frank Sinatra in 1946. His professional career had stalled by the 1950s, but it was reborn in 1953 after he won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in From Here to Eternity.

He signed with Capitol Records in 1953 and released several critically lauded albums (such as In the Wee Small Hours, Songs for Swingin' Lovers, Come Fly with Me, Only the Lonely and Nice 'n' Easy). Sinatra left Capitol to found his own record label, Reprise Records in 1961 (finding success with albums such as Ring-a-Ding-Ding!, Sinatra at the Sands and Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim), toured internationally, was a founding member of the Rat Pack and fraternized with celebrities and statesmen, including John F. Kennedy. Sinatra turned 50 in 1965, recorded the retrospective September of My Years, starred in the Emmy-winning television special Frank Sinatra: A Man and His Music, and scored hits with "Strangers in the Night" and "My Way".

With sales of his music dwindling and after appearing in several poorly received films, Sinatra retired for the first time in 1971. Two years later, however, he came out of retirement and in 1973 recorded several albums, scoring a Top 40 hit with "(Theme From) New York, New York" in 1980. Using his Las Vegas shows as a home base, he toured both within the United States and internationally, until a short time before his death in 1998. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Sinatra

__ http://www.sinatra.com/
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10 December: Human Rights Day ~ "The Universal Declaration of Human Rights" (Seth Brau; Amy Poncher)

http://www.humanrightsactioncenter.org Created by Seth Brau Produced by Amy Poncher Music by Rumspringa courtesy Cantora Records...

 

Human Rights Day is celebrated annually across the world on 10 December.

 

The date was chosen to honor the United Nations General Assembly's adoption and proclamation, on 10 December 1948, of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), the first global enunciation of human rights and one of the first major achievements of the new United Nations. The formal establishment of Human Rights Day occurred at the 317th Plenary Meeting of the General Assembly on 4 December 1950, when the General Assembly declared resolution 423(V), inviting all member states and any other interested organizations to celebrate the day as they saw fit. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_Rights_Day

 

__ http://www.un.org/events/humanrights/

 

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a declaration adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 10 December 1948 at Palais de Chaillot, Paris. The Declaration arose directly from the experience of the Second World War and represents the first global expression of rights to which all human beings are inherently entitled. It consists of 30 articles which have been elaborated in subsequent international treaties, regional human rights instruments, national constitutions and laws. The International Bill of Human Rights consists of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and its two Optional Protocols. In 1966 the General Assembly adopted the two detailed Covenants, which complete the International Bill of Human Rights; and in 1976, after the Covenants had been ratified by a sufficient number of individual nations, the Bill took on the force of international law. [...]

 

Criticism

 

Most Muslim countries have signed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other human rights agreements. In 1948, Saudi Arabia did not sign the declaration, arguing it violated Islamic law. However, Pakistan (which had signed the declaration) criticized the Saudi position. In 1982, the Iranian representative to the United Nations, Said Rajaie-Khorassani, said that the UDHR was "a secular understanding of the Judeo-Christian tradition", which could not be implemented by Muslims without trespassing the Islamic law. On 30 June 2000, Muslim nations that are members of the Organisation of the Islamic Conference (now the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation) officially resolved to support the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam, an alternative document that says people have "freedom and right to a dignified life in accordance with the Islamic Shari’ah", without any discrimination on grounds of "race, colour, language, sex, religious belief, political affiliation, social status or other considerations". As a secular state, Turkey has signed the declaration of Human Rights in 1948 and other European Human Rights agreements.

 

A number of scholars in different fields have expressed concerns with the Declaration's western bias. These include Irene Oh (Religion and Ethics), Abdulaziz Sachedina (Religion), Riffat Hassan (Theology) and Faisal Kutty (Law). Riffat Hassan argues as follows:

 

"What needs to be pointed out to those who uphold the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to be the highest, or sole, model, of a charter of equality and liberty for all human beings, is that given the Western origin and orientation of this Declaration, the "universality" of the assumptions on which it is based is - at the very least - problematic and subject to questioning. Furthermore, the alleged incompatibility between the concept of human rights and religion in general, or particular religions such as Islam, needs to be examined in an unbiased way."

 

Irene Oh argues that one of the ways to reconcile the two is the approach it from the perspective of comparative ethics.

Kutty writes: "A strong argument can be made that the current formulation of international human rights constitutes a cultural structure in which western society finds itself easily at home ... It is important to acknowledge and appreciate that other societies may have equally valid alternative conceptions of human rights."

 

The Right to Refuse to Kill

 

Groups such as Amnesty International and War Resisters International have advocated for "The Right to Refuse to Kill" to be added to the UDHR. War Resisters International has stated that the right to conscientious objection to military service is primarily derived from, but not yet explicit in, Article 18 the UDHR: the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion.

 

Steps have been taken within the United Nations to make this right more explicit; but those steps have been limited to secondary, more "marginal" United Nations documents. That is why Amnesty International would like to have this right brought "out of the margins" and explicitly into the primary document, namely the UDHR itself.

 

To the rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights one more might, with relevance, be added. It is "The Right to Refuse to Kill."

— Assistant Secretary General of the United Nations, and Nobel Peace Laureate, Sean MacBride, 1974 Nobel Lecture

__ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Declaration_of_Human_Rights

 

Full text of the UDHR http://www.un.org/Overview/rights.html

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Happy Birthday, Joshua Bell! 9 December 1967 ~ "Stop and Hear the Music"

http://tinyurl.com/q4j6l4 From the Washington Post: Pearls Before Breakfast Can one of the nation's great musicians cut through the fog of a D.C. rush hour? ...

 

Joshua David Bell (born December 9, 1967) is an American Grammy Award-winning violinist.

 

Bell was born in Bloomington, Indiana, United States, the son of a psychologist and a therapist. Bell's parents were Shirley and Alan P. Bell, Professor Emeritus of Indiana University, in Bloomington, and a former Kinsey researcher. His father is of Scottish descent, and his mother is Jewish (his maternal grandfather was born in Israel and his maternal grandmother was from Minsk). Bell told The Jewish Journal, "I identify myself as being Jewish".

 

Bell began taking violin lessons at the age of four after his mother discovered that her son had taken rubber bands from around the house and stretched them across the handles of his dresser drawer to pluck out music he had heard her play on the piano. His parents got a scaled-to-size violin for their then five-year-old son and started giving him lessons. A bright student, Bell took to the instrument but lived an otherwise normal midwest Indiana life playing video games and excelling at sports, namely tennis and bowling, even placing in a national tennis tournament at the age of ten.

 

Bell made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1985, at age 17, with the St. Louis Symphony. He has since performed with many of the world's major orchestras and conductors. As well as the standard concerto repertoire, Bell has performed new works. Nicholas Maw's violin concerto is dedicated to Bell, who premiered it in 1993 and won a Grammy Award for his recording of the piece. He performed the solo part on John Corigliano's Oscar-winning soundtrack for the film The Red Violin and was also featured in Ladies in Lavender. Bell made an appearance in the movie Music of the Heart, a story about the power of music, with other notable violinists. [...]

 

In an experiment initiated by The Washington Post columnist Gene Weingarten, Bell donned a baseball cap and played as an incognito busker at the Metro subway station L'Enfant Plaza in Washington, D.C. on January 12, 2007. The experiment was videotaped on hidden camera; of the 1,097 people who passed by, only seven stopped to listen to him, and only one recognized him. For his nearly 45-minute performance, Bell collected $32.17 from 27 passersby (excluding $20 from the passerby who recognized him). The night before, he earned considerably more playing the same repertoire at a concert. Weingarten won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing for his article on the experiment. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joshua_Bell

 

__ http://www.joshuabell.com/

 

"Pearls Before Breakfast Can one of the nation's great musicians cut through the fog of a D.C. rush hour? Let's find out." By Gene Weingarten, Washington Post Staff Writer; Sunday, April 8, 2007
__ http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/04/AR2007040401721.html

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Happy Birthday, Billy Edd Wheeler! 9 December 1932 ~ "Coal Tattoo"

Billy Edward "Edd" Wheeler (born December 9, 1932, Boone County, West Virginia) is an American songwriter, performer, writer, and visual artist.

 

His songs include Jackson (Grammy award winner for Johnny Cash and June Carter) The Rev. Mr. Black, Desert Pete, Anne, High Flyin' Bird, The Coming of the Roads, It’s Midnight, Ode to the Little Brown Shack Out Back, Coal Tattoo, Winter Sky, and Coward of the County (which inspired a 1981 television movie of the same name) and have been performed by over 160 artists including Judy Collins, Jefferson Airplane, Bobby Darin, The Kingston Trio, Neil Young, Kenny Rogers, Hazel Dickens, Florence and the Machine, Kathy Mattea, Nancy Sinatra, and Elvis Presley. Jackson was also recorded by Joaquin Phoenix and Reese Witherspoon for the movie Walk the Line.

 

Wheeler is the author-composer of eight plays and musicals, a folk opera (Song of the Cumberland Gap), commissioned by the National Geographic Society, and three outdoor dramas: the long-running Hatfields & McCoys at Beckley, West Virginia, Young Abe Lincoln at Lincoln City, Indiana, and Johnny Appleseed, at Mansfield, Ohio. He has authored six books of humor, four with Loyal Jones of Berea, Kentucky: Laughter in Appalachia, Hometown Humor USA, Curing the Cross-Eyed Mule, and More Laughter in Appalachia, and two as sole author: Outhouse Humor, and Real Country Humor / Jokes from Country Music Personalities. His first novel, Star of Appalachia, was published in January, 2004, and his second, co-written with Ewel Cornett, Kudzu Covers Manhattan, in 2005. Song of a Woods Colt, a book of poetry, was published in 1969. Travis and Other Poems of the Swannanoa Valley (With Some Poems and Prayers by Dr. Henry W. Jensen) was published in 1977. He was the featured author in Appalachian Heritage magazine’s 2008 winter issue, which included 16 of his original paintings. North Carolina’s Our State magazine featured him in its December, 2007 issue. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Edd_Wheeler

 

__ http://www.billyeddwheeler.com/

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Happy Birthday, Sinéad O'Connor! 8 December 1966 ~ "Song to the Siren"

a song by Tim Buckley, covered by many musicians, including This Mortal Coil, John Frusciante and Half Man Half Biscuit - here by Sinead...

 

Sinéad Marie Bernadette O'Connor (born 8 December 1966) is an Irish singer-songwriter who rose to fame in the late 1980s with her debut album The Lion and the Cobra. O'Connor achieved worldwide success in 1990 with a cover of Prince's song "Nothing Compares 2 U".

 

Since then, while maintaining her singing career, she has occasionally encountered controversy, partly due to her statements and gestures - such as her ordination as a priest despite being a woman with a Roman Catholic background - and her strongly expressed views on organised religion, women's rights, war, and child abuse.

 

In addition to her nine solo albums her work includes many singles, songs for films, collaborations with many other artists and appearances at charity fundraising concerts. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sin%C3%A9ad_O%27Connor

 

__ http://www.sineadoconnor.com/

__ http://www.facebook.com/pages/Sinead-OConnor/246972478675081

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Happy Birthday, Jean Ritchie! 8 December 1922 ~ "Brightest and Best"

Jean Ritchie (born December 8, 1922) is an American folk music singer, songwriter, and Appalachian dulcimer player. Abigail and Balis Ritchie of Viper, Kentucky had 14 children, and Jean was the youngest. Ten girls slept in one room of the farming family's house in the Cumberland Mountains.

 

Jean Ritchie quickly memorized songs and performed at local dances and the county fairs with Chalmers and Velma NcDaniels ( who grew up with her in Viper) ,where they repeated ly won blue ribbons Hazard. In the late 1940s the family acquired a radio and discovered that what they were singing was hillbilly music, a word they had never heard before. In the mid-thirties Alan Lomax recorded in Kentucky for the Library of Congress's Archive of Folk Song. Among the people he recorded were The Singing Ritchies.

 

Ritchie attended Cumberland College (Now the University of the Cumberlands) in Williamsburg, Kentucky and later the University of Kentucky in Lexington. At college she joined the glee club and choir and learned to play piano. In 1946 she graduated with a BA in social work. During the war, she taught in elementary school. [...]

 

Ritchie became known as "The Mother of Folk". As well as work songs and ballads, Ritchie knew hymns from the "Old Regular Baptist" church she attended in Jeff, Kentucky. These were sung as "lining out" songs, in a lingering soulful way. One of the songs they sang was "Amazing Grace". She wrote some songs, including one on the effects of strip mining in Kentucky. (Some of Ritchie's late 1950s/early 1960s songs on mining she published under the pseudonym "'Than Hall" to avoid troubling her non-political mother, and believing they might be better received if attributed to a man.)

"My Dear Companion" appeared on the album Trio recorded by Linda Ronstadt, Dolly Parton, and Emmylou Harris. Judy Collins not only recorded some of Ritchie's traditional songs, "Tender Ladies" and "Pretty Saro", but used a photograph by George Pickow on the front of her album Golden Apples of the Sun (1962). [...]

 

Ritchie has performed at Carnegie Hall and at the Royal Albert Hall. Her album, None But One, was awarded the Rolling Stone Critics award in 1977.

 

In 2002, Ritchie received a National Endowment For The Arts National Heritage Fellowship, the Nation's highest honor in the folk and traditional arts. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Ritchie

 

Jean Ritchie sole guest on Wood Songs #159 (2000) __ http://128.163.130.14/woodsongs-159.wmv

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Happy Birthday, Sara Bareilles! 7 December 1979 ~ "Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For"

U2 cover live at Joe's Pub 2/16/09...

 

Sara Beth Bareilles (born December 7, 1979) is an American singer-songwriter and pianist. She achieved mainstream success in 2007 with the hit single "Love Song", which brought her into the number one spot on the Billboard Pop 100 chart. She has sold over 1 million records and over 4 million singles in the United States alone and has been nominated for a Grammy Award three times. In the third season of NBC's The Sing-Off, Bareilles was a celebrity judge alongside Ben Folds and Shawn Stockman of Boyz II Men. In February 2012, VH1 placed Bareilles in the #80 spot of the Top 100 Greatest Women in Music. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sara_Bareilles

 

__ http://www.sarabmusic.com/

__ https://twitter.com/SaraBareilles

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Harry Chapin - 7 December 1942 - 16 July 1981 ~ "Mr. Tanner"

Harry Forster Chapin (December 7, 1942 – July 16, 1981) was an American singer-songwriter best known for his folk rock songs including "Taxi", "W*O*L*D", "Flowers Are Red" and the No. 1 hit "Cat's in the Cradle". Chapin was also a dedicated humanitarian who fought to end world hunger; he was a key player in the creation of the Presidential Commission on World Hunger in 1977. In 1987, Chapin was posthumously awarded the Congressional Gold Medal for his humanitarian work. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Chapin

 

__ http://foundationcenter.org/grantmaker/harrychapin/
__ http://www.harrychapinmusic.com/

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Dave Brubeck ~ 6 December 1920 - 5 December 2012 ~ "Blue Rondo à la Turk" (2 pour l'prix d'1)

Très belle interprétation à la guitare de ce standard jazz de Dave Brubeck, par le duo guitaristique "2 pour l'prix d'1" voir toutes leurs vidéos: http://seb...

 

David Warren "Dave" Brubeck (December 6, 1920 – December 5, 2012) was an American jazz pianist and composer, considered to be one of the foremost exponents of progressive jazz. He wrote a number of jazz standards, including "In Your Own Sweet Way" and "The Duke". Brubeck's style ranged from refined to bombastic, reflecting his mother's attempts at classical training and his improvisational skills. His music is known for employing unusual time signatures, and superimposing contrasting rhythms, meters, and tonalities.

 

His long-time musical partner, alto saxophonist Paul Desmond, wrote the saxophone melody for the Dave Brubeck Quartet's best remembered piece, "Take Five", which is in 5/4 time and has endured as a jazz classic on one of the top-selling jazz albums, Time Out. Brubeck experimented with time signatures throughout his career, recording "Pick Up Sticks" in 6/4, "Unsquare Dance" in 7/4, "World's Fair" in 13/4, and "Blue Rondo à la Turk" in 9/8. He was also a respected composer of orchestral and sacred music, and wrote soundtracks for television such as Mr. Broadway and the animated mini-series This Is America, Charlie Brown. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Brubeck

 

__ http://www.davebrubeck.com/

__ http://www.pacific.edu/Community/Centers-Clinics-and-Institutes/Brubeck-Institute.html

 

__ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Rondo_%C3%A0_la_Turk

__ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_Out_%28album%29

 

__ http://www.pbs.org/brubeck/

__ http://www.npr.org/blogs/therecord/2012/12/05/166571712/remembering-the-vital-force-of-jazz-pianist-dave-brubeck

__ http://www.npr.org/2010/12/03/131731507/celebrating-jazz-pianist-dave-brubeck-s-90th-birthday

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Dave Brubeck ~ 6 December 1920 - 5 December 2012 ~ "Blue Rondo à la Turk" (Rastrelli Cello Quartett)

www.rastrelli.de...

 

David Warren "Dave" Brubeck (December 6, 1920 – December 5, 2012) was an American jazz pianist and composer, considered to be one of the foremost exponents of progressive jazz. He wrote a number of jazz standards, including "In Your Own Sweet Way" and "The Duke". Brubeck's style ranged from refined to bombastic, reflecting his mother's attempts at classical training and his improvisational skills. His music is known for employing unusual time signatures, and superimposing contrasting rhythms, meters, and tonalities.

 

His long-time musical partner, alto saxophonist Paul Desmond, wrote the saxophone melody for the Dave Brubeck Quartet's best remembered piece, "Take Five", which is in 5/4 time and has endured as a jazz classic on one of the top-selling jazz albums, Time Out. Brubeck experimented with time signatures throughout his career, recording "Pick Up Sticks" in 6/4, "Unsquare Dance" in 7/4, "World's Fair" in 13/4, and "Blue Rondo à la Turk" in 9/8. He was also a respected composer of orchestral and sacred music, and wrote soundtracks for television such as Mr. Broadway and the animated mini-series This Is America, Charlie Brown. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Brubeck

 

__ http://www.davebrubeck.com/

__ http://www.pacific.edu/Community/Centers-Clinics-and-Institutes/Brubeck-Institute.html

 

__ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Rondo_%C3%A0_la_Turk

__ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_Out_%28album%29

 

__ http://www.pbs.org/brubeck/

__ http://www.npr.org/blogs/therecord/2012/12/05/166571712/remembering-the-vital-force-of-jazz-pianist-dave-brubeck

__ http://www.npr.org/2010/12/03/131731507/celebrating-jazz-pianist-dave-brubeck-s-90th-birthday

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