I Shall Sing
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I Shall Sing
Videos for Selected Celebrations, Commemorations & Other Observances - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_historical_anniversaries
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Allen Ginsberg: June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997 ~ "Howl"

Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997) reads his long poem Howl Text of the poem: http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/pubweb/~cinichol/CreativeWriting/323/GinsbergHowl.htm...

 

Irwin Allen Ginsberg (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet and one of the leading figures of the Beat Generation in the 1950s. He vigorously opposed militarism, materialism and sexual repression. Ginsberg is best known for his epic poem "Howl", in which he celebrated his fellow "angel-headed hipsters" and harshly denounced what he saw as the destructive forces of capitalism and conformity in the United States. This poem is one of the classic poems of the Beat Generation. The poem, which was dedicated to writer Carl Solomon, opens:

 

I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by
madness, starving hysterical naked,
dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn
looking for an angry fix...

  __Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allen_Ginsberg

 

http://www.allenginsberg.org/

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June 1, 1946: Happy Birthday, Jody Stecher! ~ "Walking Through Your Town in the Snow"

Married bluegrass duo perform the timeless country classic, "Walking Through Your Town in the Snow," written by the great Utah Phillips. LYRICS I'm walking t...

 

Jody Stecher (born June 1, 1946) is an American singer and musician, who plays bluegrass and old-time music on banjo, mandolin, fiddle and guitar, and Dagar-vani dhrupad on the sursringar, a rare Indian instrument that is a baritone relative of the sarod. __Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jody_Stecher

 

http://www.dawgnet.com/acd_html/artists/stecher.html

 

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Hazel Dickens: June 1, 1935 – April 22, 2011 ~ "Play Us a Waltz"

From "It's Hard to Tell the Singer from the Song." RIP, Hazel.

 

Hazel Jane Dickens (June 1, 1935 – April 22, 2011) was an American bluegrass singer, songwriter, double bassist and guitarist. Her music was characterized not only by her high, lonesome singing style, but also by her provocative pro-union, feminist songs. Cultural blogger John Pietaro noted that "Dickens didn’t just sing the anthems of labor, she lived them and her place on many a picket line, staring down gunfire and goon squads, embedded her into the cause." The New York Times extolled her as "a clarion-voiced advocate for coal miners and working people and a pioneer among women in bluegrass music". __Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hazel_Dickens

 

"It's Hard to Tell the Singer from the Song" review by Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr., AllMusic.com

 

It's Hard to Tell the Singer from the Song is a beautiful, emotionally raw album from start to finish. Throughout, Dickens creates a music that's traditional and timeless, while also having her feet firmly planted in the here and now. Traditional country songs like "California Cottonfields" clearly share an affinity for the working person, while Dylan's "Only a Hobo" reveals the sacredness of even the "lowliest" life. Dickens also enjoys singing feminist-tinged songs like "You'll Get No More of Me" and the anti-war anthem "Will Jesus Wash the Bloodstains From Your Hands?" Dickens seems to enjoy updating tradition, drawing from her West Virginia background while adding political touches usually absent from folk and country music.

 

Part of the success of this project is that excellent musicians like Jerry Douglas, Russ Barenberg, and Blaine Sprouse offer tasteful support throughout. Dickens' voice also proves a perfect instrument to communicate the stark lyrics of songs like "Hills of Home." Her delivery has more in common with the Carter Family than contemporary bluegrass and country singing, and her old-time vocals add to the emotional impact of this material.

 

Songs like "Hills of Home" and "A Few Old Memories" deal with the sense of loss that comes from leaving behind familiar places like a childhood home. "Play Us a Waltz" sketches a portrait from inside a nursing home, "where there's no one to love, and nothing to do." The characters that inhabit It's Hard to Tell the Singer from the Song long for a sense of place in the modern world and cry out for compassion and understanding. This is powerful album and a mature artistic statement.


http://www.allmusic.com/album/its-hard-to-tell-the-singer-from-the-song-mw0000312769

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Walt Whitman: May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892 ~ "URL of Myself," by Cate Matthews

So. That took a long time. (cont.) Ralph Waldo Emerson (that transcendentalist guy from the late 1800s) wrote an essay called "The Poet," in which he espouse...

 

http://twitter.com/#!/cateematthews

 

Walter "Walt" Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist and journalist. A humanist, he was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both views in his works. Whitman is among the most influential poets in the American canon, often called the father of free verse. His work was very controversial in its time, particularly his poetry collection Leaves of Grass, which was described as obscene for its overt sexuality. __Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walt_Whitman

 

http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/whitman/

http://www.whitmanarchive.org/

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/whitman/

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Walt Whitman: May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892 ~ "Song of Myself" (American Experience, PBS)

"I bequeath myself to the dirt to grow from the grass I love, If you want me again look for me under your boot-soles. You will hardly know who I am or what I...

 

Walter "Walt" Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist and journalist. A humanist, he was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both views in his works. Whitman is among the most influential poets in the American canon, often called the father of free verse. His work was very controversial in its time, particularly his poetry collection Leaves of Grass, which was described as obscene for its overt sexuality. __Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walt_Whitman

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/whitman/

http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/whitman/

http://www.whitmanarchive.org/

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May 31, 1938: Happy Birthday, Peter Yarrow! ~ "The Great Mandala" (with Richie Havens)

THE GREAT MANDALA (The Wheel of Life) - Peter Yarrow So I told him that he'd better shut his mouth And do his job like a man. And he answered "Listen, Father...

 

Peter Yarrow (born May 31, 1938) is an American singer who found fame with the 1960s folk music trio Peter, Paul and Mary. Yarrow co-wrote (with Leonard Lipton) one of the group's most famous songs, "Puff, the Magic Dragon". He is also a political activist and has lent his support to causes that range from opposition to the Vietnam War to the creation of Operation Respect.
__Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Yarrow

 

http://www.peterpaulandmary.com/

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Rest in Peace, Doc Watson ~ March 3, 1923 – May 29, 2012 ~ "Deep River Blues"

Doc pickin "Deep River Blues" in his beautiful Merle Travis influenced style. This was recorded in 1991.

 

Arthel Lane "Doc" Watson (March 3, 1923 – May 29, 2012) was an American guitarist, songwriter and singer of bluegrass, folk, country, blues and gospel music. Watson won seven Grammy awards as well as a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Watson's flatpicking skills and knowledge of traditional American music are highly regarded. He performed with his son Merle for over 15 years until Merle's death in 1985, in an accident on the family farm.  __Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doc_Watson

 

http://www.merlefest.org/

http://www.docsguitar.com/

Guitarist Arthel 'Doc' Watson Interview on NPR's Fresh Air: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1914571

 

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Benny Goodman: May 30, 1909 – June 13, 1986 ~ "Sweet Georgia Brown"

Aurex Jazz Festival, Sep. 3, 1980 at Budokan (Tokyo, Japan)

 

cl: Benny Goodman; p: Teddy Wilson; tp: Tony Terran; tb:Dick Nash; g: Eddie Duran; b: Al Obidenski; dr: John Markham

 

http://www.bennygoodman.com/index.php

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benny_Goodman

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Benny Goodman: May 30, 1909 – June 13, 1986 ~ "Sing Sing Sing"

Sing, Sing, Sing the way it should be played.

 

"Sing Sing Sing" - Carnegie Hall Performance http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NigiwMtWE0

 

from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benny_Goodman

 

“In bringing jazz to Carnegie, [Benny Goodman was], in effect, smuggling American contraband into the halls of European high culture, and Goodman and his 15 men pull[ed] it off with the audacity and precision of Ocean's Eleven.”
—Will Friedwald

 

In late 1937, Goodman's publicist Wynn Nathanson attempted a publicity stunt by suggesting Goodman and his band should play Carnegie Hall in New York City. If this concert were to take place, then Benny Goodman would be the first jazz bandleader to perform at Carnegie Hall. "Benny Goodman was initially hesitant about the concert, fearing for the worst; however, when his film Hollywood Hotel opened to rave reviews and giant lines, he threw himself into the work. He gave up several dates and insisted on holding rehearsals inside Carnegie Hall to familiarize the band with the lively acoustics."

 

The concert was the evening of January 16, 1938. It sold out weeks before, with the capacity 2,760 seats going for the top price of US$2.75 a seat, for the time a very high price [...]

 

By the time the band got to the climactic piece "Sing, Sing, Sing", success was assured. This performance featured playing by tenor saxophonist Babe Russin, trumpeter Harry James, and Benny Goodman, backed by drummer Gene Krupa. When Goodman finished his solo, he unexpectedly gave a solo to pianist Jess Stacy. "At the Carnegie Hall concert, after the usual theatrics, Jess Stacy was allowed to solo and, given the venue, what followed was appropriate," wrote David Rickert. "Used to just playing rhythm on the tune, he was unprepared for a turn in the spotlight, but what came out of his fingers was a graceful, impressionistic marvel with classical flourishes, yet still managed to swing. It was the best thing he ever did, and it's ironic that such a layered, nuanced performance came at the end of such a chaotic, bombastic tune.

 

This concert has been regarded as one of the most significant in jazz history. After years of work by musicians from all over the country, jazz had finally been accepted by mainstream audiences.

 

Recordings were made of this concert, but even by the technology of the day the equipment used was not of the finest quality. [...] "It was Benny's sister-in-law who found the recordings in Benny's apartment [in 1950] and brought them to Benny's attention.”—Ross Firestone

 

Goodman took the newly discovered recording to his record company, Columbia, and a selection was issued on LP. These recordings have not been out of print since they were first issued. In early 1998, the aluminum masters were rediscovered and a new CD set of the concert was released based on these masters. The album released based on those masters went on to be one of the best selling live jazz albums of all time.

 

http://www.bennygoodman.com/index.php

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May 28, 2012: Memorial Day (U.S.) ~ "Aftermath" (Siegfried Sassoon)

AFTERMATH
by Siegfried Sassoon (1920)

 

HAVE you forgotten yet?...

 

For the world's events have rumbled on since those gagged days,
Like traffic checked while at the crossing of city-ways:
And the haunted gap in your mind has filled with thoughts that flow
Like clouds in the lit heaven of life; and you're a man reprieved to go,
Taking your peaceful share of Time, with joy to spare.

 

But the past is just the same--and War's a bloody game...
Have you forgotten yet?...
Look down, and swear by the slain of the War that you'll never forget.

 

Do you remember the dark months you held the sector at Mametz--
The nights you watched and wired and dug and piled sandbags on parapets?
Do you remember the rats; and the stench
Of corpses rotting in front of the front-line trench--
And dawn coming, dirty-white, and chill with a hopeless rain?
Do you ever stop and ask, 'Is it all going to happen again?'

 

Do you remember that hour of din before the attack--
And the anger, the blind compassion that seized and shook you then
As you peered at the doomed and haggard faces of your men?
Do you remember the stretcher-cases lurching back
With dying eyes and lolling heads--those ashen-grey
Masks of the lads who once were keen and kind and gay?

 

Have you forgotten yet?...
Look up, and swear by the green of the spring that you'll never forget.

 

http://www.aftermathww1.com/sassoon.asp

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May 28, 2012: Memorial Day (U.S.) ~ "The Vacant Chair", Kathy Mattea et al

Kathy Mattea, Roy Huskey Jr., Jerry Douglas and others perform "The Vacant Chair".

 

The Vacant Chair
(We Shall Meet But We Shall Miss Him)
(Words: Henry S. Washburn, Music: George F. Root)

 

We shall meet, but we shall miss him

There will be one vacant chair

We shall linger to caress him

While we breathe our evening prayer;

 

When a year ago we gathered

Joy was in his mild blue eye,

But a golden chord is severed

And our hopes in ruin lie. 

 

[chorus]

  We shall meet, but we shall miss him

  There will be one vacant chair

  We shall linger to caress him

  While we breathe our evening prayer;

 

At our fireside, sad and lonely,

Often will the bosom swell,

At remembrance of the story

How our noble Willie fell;

How he strove to bear our banner

Through the thickest of the fight,

And uphold our country's honor

In the strength of manhood's night.

 

[chorus]

 

True, they tell us wreaths of glory

Ever more will deck his brow,

But this soothes the anguish only

Sweeping o'er our heartstrings now.

Sleep today, Oh early fallen,

In thy green and narrow bed,

Dirges from the pine and cypress,

Mingle with the tears we shed.

http://sniff.numachi.com/pages/tiVCNTCHAR;ttVCNTCHAR.html

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May 28, 1956: Happy Birthday, Jerry Douglas! "Big Bug Shuffle"

"We found that an ensemble of three instrumental voices offers unique opportunities and challenges. First, you get to play a lot, and everything you play is of critical importance. The trio challenges and sharpens your skills by giving you responsibility. You are one third the total effort, so your playing is often exposed, if not featured. You will be sorely missed if you get lazy, and you will stick out like a sore thumb if you get sloppy. The relatively spare environment encourages playing that is rhythmically sturdy and textually interesting, yet it still provides the support and interactive stimulation that helps draw out and energize your ideas.

 

"Though demanding, a trio is extremely flexible and responsive. It is a highly conducive medium in which musical energy is easily transmitted. One player can quickly elicit response from the others, effortlessly taking the lead in imparting dynamic direction. With this degree of responsiveness, rhythm can be handled with delicacy and control. Each player has immediate access to the group's interpretation of time and phrasing. No one person dominates; each is able to influence the others. A trio inspires good listening."

 

  from "Skip, Hop & Wobble" liner notes, by Russ Barenberg; Sugar Hill Records SH-CD 3817

 

http://www.jerrydouglas.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerry_Douglas_(musician)

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May 28, 1956: Happy Birthday, Jerry Douglas! "Another Morning"

Bela and Jerry perform Bela's tune "Another Morning" from his Doubletime album. These guys show their musical genius with this performance.

 

"Double Time is an album by American banjoist Béla Fleck, released in 1984. Every song is a duet with some of the stars of the genre. The billing includes Mark O'Connor, Sam Bush, David Grisman, Pat Flynn, Tony Rice, and Jerry Douglas, among others.

 

"In his Allmusic review, Brian Kelly stated, 'the program features a dozen or so warm, homegrown finger exercises that dot the music map everywhere between bluegrass and jazz fusion.' This album can be compared with similar effort by David Grisman, Dawg Duos, where Fleck performs duo with Grisman on one of the tracks." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_Time_(B%C3%A9la_Fleck_album)

 

http://www.jerrydouglas.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerry_Douglas_(musician)

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June 1, 1946: Happy Birthday, Jody Stecher! ~ "Leela Leela" (1974)

Released in 1974 on Jody Stecher's first LP 'Snake Baked a Hoecake," which represents a mix of American, Folk, Irish/Celtic, and Indian styles. Free download...

 

Jody Stecher (born June 1, 1946) is an American singer and musician, who plays bluegrass and old-time music on banjo, mandolin, fiddle and guitar, and Dagar-vani dhrupad on the sursringar, a rare Indian instrument that is a baritone relative of the sarod.  __Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jody_Stecher

 

from "Cornbread, Molasses & Sassafras Tea", by Gadaya

 

“Snake baked a hoecake” is Jody Stecher’s first lp, issued by Bay Records in 1974. In my previous Jody Stecher’s post (“Rasa” with sitarist Krisna Bhatt”) i already told how great musician he is and how he manages to pick up the best from every musical traditions he goes into. On this album, there’s a mix of american and irish/celtic tunes and a awesome song with a indian flavor (Leela,leela…every time i listen to it, it makes me want to sing and dance and go live in an ashram). Jody is playing with a bunch of friends and the whole atmosphere of the lp reflects the good time they have playing together.

 

On his next album, “Going up on the mountain” (one of my favorite lp of all time), he would continue in a more bluegrass vein, with more singing than on this one. There would be also the first duets with Kate Brislin, her wife and musical partner with whom he made some superb records ever since.  __ http://longplayingrecords.wordpress.com/2009/03/05/jody-stecher-friends-snake-baked-a-hoecake/

 

http://www.dawgnet.com/acd_html/artists/stecher.html

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Hazel Dickens: June 1, 1935 – April 22, 2011 ~ "Hills of Home" (granniejans cover)

A Hazel Dickens song. Goodbye, Hazel.Rest in Peace, 04-22-2011...

 

Hazel Jane Dickens (June 1, 1935 – April 22, 2011) was an American bluegrass singer, songwriter, double bassist and guitarist. Her music was characterized not only by her high, lonesome singing style, but also by her provocative pro-union, feminist songs. Cultural blogger John Pietaro noted that "Dickens didn’t just sing the anthems of labor, she lived them and her place on many a picket line, staring down gunfire and goon squads, embedded her into the cause." The New York Times extolled her as "a clarion-voiced advocate for coal miners and working people and a pioneer among women in bluegrass music".  __Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hazel_Dickens

 

"It's Hard to Tell the Singer from the Song" review by Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr., AllMusic.com

 

It's Hard to Tell the Singer from the Song is a beautiful, emotionally raw album from start to finish. Throughout, Dickens creates a music that's traditional and timeless, while also having her feet firmly planted in the here and now. Traditional country songs like "California Cottonfields" clearly share an affinity for the working person, while Dylan's "Only a Hobo" reveals the sacredness of even the "lowliest" life. Dickens also enjoys singing feminist-tinged songs like "You'll Get No More of Me" and the anti-war anthem "Will Jesus Wash the Bloodstains From Your Hands?" Dickens seems to enjoy updating tradition, drawing from her West Virginia background while adding political touches usually absent from folk and country music.

 

Part of the success of this project is that excellent musicians like Jerry Douglas, Russ Barenberg, and Blaine Sprouse offer tasteful support throughout. Dickens' voice also proves a perfect instrument to communicate the stark lyrics of songs like "Hills of Home." Her delivery has more in common with the Carter Family than contemporary bluegrass and country singing, and her old-time vocals add to the emotional impact of this material.

 

Songs like "Hills of Home" and "A Few Old Memories" deal with the sense of loss that comes from leaving behind familiar places like a childhood home. "Play Us a Waltz" sketches a portrait from inside a nursing home, "where there's no one to love, and nothing to do." The characters that inhabit It's Hard to Tell the Singer from the Song long for a sense of place in the modern world and cry out for compassion and understanding. This is powerful album and a mature artistic statement.

 

http://www.allmusic.com/album/its-hard-to-tell-the-singer-from-the-song-mw0000312769

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Hazel Dickens: June 1, 1935 – April 22, 2011 ~ "A Few Old Memories"

From the album "It's hard to tell the Singer from the Song". Complete with hiss and pop.

 

Hazel Jane Dickens (June 1, 1935 – April 22, 2011) was an American bluegrass singer, songwriter, double bassist and guitarist. Her music was characterized not only by her high, lonesome singing style, but also by her provocative pro-union, feminist songs. Cultural blogger John Pietaro noted that "Dickens didn’t just sing the anthems of labor, she lived them and her place on many a picket line, staring down gunfire and goon squads, embedded her into the cause." The New York Times extolled her as "a clarion-voiced advocate for coal miners and working people and a pioneer among women in bluegrass music".  __Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hazel_Dickens

 

 "It's Hard to Tell the Singer from the Song" review by Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr., AllMusic.com

 

It's Hard to Tell the Singer from the Song is a beautiful, emotionally raw album from start to finish. Throughout, Dickens creates a music that's traditional and timeless, while also having her feet firmly planted in the here and now. Traditional country songs like "California Cottonfields" clearly share an affinity for the working person, while Dylan's "Only a Hobo" reveals the sacredness of even the "lowliest" life. Dickens also enjoys singing feminist-tinged songs like "You'll Get No More of Me" and the anti-war anthem "Will Jesus Wash the Bloodstains From Your Hands?" Dickens seems to enjoy updating tradition, drawing from her West Virginia background while adding political touches usually absent from folk and country music.

 

Part of the success of this project is that excellent musicians like Jerry Douglas, Russ Barenberg, and Blaine Sprouse offer tasteful support throughout. Dickens' voice also proves a perfect instrument to communicate the stark lyrics of songs like "Hills of Home." Her delivery has more in common with the Carter Family than contemporary bluegrass and country singing, and her old-time vocals add to the emotional impact of this material.

 

Songs like "Hills of Home" and "A Few Old Memories" deal with the sense of loss that comes from leaving behind familiar places like a childhood home. "Play Us a Waltz" sketches a portrait from inside a nursing home, "where there's no one to love, and nothing to do." The characters that inhabit It's Hard to Tell the Singer from the Song long for a sense of place in the modern world and cry out for compassion and understanding. This is powerful album and a mature artistic statement.


http://www.allmusic.com/album/its-hard-to-tell-the-singer-from-the-song-mw0000312769

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Walt Whitman: May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892 ~ "Leaves of Grass"

This excerpt contains the famous stanza "I think I could turn and live with animals". You can read Leaves of Grass here: http://www.laits.utexas.edu/leavesof...

 

Walter "Walt" Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist and journalist. A humanist, he was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both views in his works. Whitman is among the most influential poets in the American canon, often called the father of free verse. His work was very controversial in its time, particularly his poetry collection Leaves of Grass, which was described as obscene for its overt sexuality. __Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walt_Whitman

 

http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/whitman/

http://www.whitmanarchive.org/

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/whitman/

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May 31: World No Tobacco Day ~ "Smoke! Smoke! Smoke! (That Cigarette)"

A toe tapping romp through (mostly) vintage cigarette TV advertising with music by Asleep at the Wheel. Also featured is the earliest filmed ad for Admiral C...

 

World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) is observed around the world every year on May 31. It is meant to encourage a 24-hour period of abstinence from all forms of tobacco consumption across the globe. The day is further intended to draw global attention to the widespread prevalence of tobacco use and to negative health effects, which currently lead to 5.4 million deaths worldwide annually.

 

The member states of the World Health Organization (WHO) created World No Tobacco Day in 1987. In the past twenty years, the day has been met with both enthusiasm and resistance across the globe from governments, public health organizations, smokers, growers, and the tobacco industry. __Wikipedia  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_No_Tobacco_Day

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smoke!_Smoke!_Smoke!_%28That_Cigarette%29

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asleep_at_the_Wheel

http://www.asleepatthewheel.com/

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May 31, 1955: Happy Birthday, Tommy Emmanuel! ~ "Guitar Boogie"

Guitar Boogie with a differance by the great TE...

 

William Thomas "Tommy" Emmanuel AM (born 31 May 1955) is an Australian guitarist and occasional singer, best known for his complex fingerstyle technique, energetic performances and the use of percussive effects on the guitar. In the May 2008 and 2010 issues of Guitar Player Magazine, he was named as "Best Acoustic Guitarist" in their readers' poll.  In June 2010 Emmanuel was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia (AM).

__ Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tommy_Emmanuel

 

http://www.tommyemmanuel.com/

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Benny Goodman: May 30, 1909 – June 13, 1986 ~ "Sing Sing Sing" (Swing Girls)

 from Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swing_Girls

 

Swing Girls is a 2004 comedy film co-written and directed by the Japanese filmmaker Shinobu Yaguchi about the efforts of a group of high school girls to form a jazz band. [...]

 

The song played by the band for their audition tape was "In the Mood" by the Glenn Miller Orchestra. The first song played at the concert finale is "Moonlight Serenade" by Glenn Miller. The second song played is "Mexican Flyer" by Ken Woodman. It is featured in Space Channel 5, which Tomoko's little sister plays early on in the movie. The final song played is "Sing Sing Sing with a Swing" by Louis Prima.

 

Many of the girls really could not play these instruments, and they did play the performances in the film, after training for only 5 months. To prove this was not movie-magic, a tour was organized after the film with a live CD released shortly after.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benny_Goodman
http://www.bennygoodman.com/index.php

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Benny Goodman: May 30, 1909 – June 13, 1986 ~ "Ding Dong Daddy" (1972)

"This is a performance of the Benny Goodman Quintet, featuring Benny Goodman himself, Gene Krupa, and Lionel Hampton [with Teddie Wilson and George Duvivier]." 

http://www.bennygoodman.com/index.php

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benny_Goodman

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May 29: International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers ~ "Peace Will Come" - Tom Paxton

Tom Paxton's song Videoed in Jacob's Ladder Folk Festival, Israel July 1st 1994...

 

The "International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers", May 29, is "a day to pay tribute to all the men and women who have served and continue to serve in United Nations peacekeeping operations for their high level of professionalism, dedication, and courage and to honor the memory of those who have lost their lives in the cause of peace."

 

It was so designated by United Nations General Assembly Resolution 57/129, on December 11, 2002 after official request of Ukrainian Peacekeepers Association and Government of Ukraine to UN General Assembly and first celebrated in 2003. The date, May 29, marks the anniversary of the creation of the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization (UNTSO), in 1948 to monitor the ceasefire after the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, which was the first ever UN peacekeeping mission.

 

The day is marked at the United Nations Headquarters in New York City with the presentation of the Dag Hammarskjöld Medal, statements by the President of the General Assembly and the Secretary-General a press release regarding the state of UN Peacekeeping missions and the continued necessity of their work.

 

There are also observances around the world, often countries will honor their own peacekeepers abroad, but the UN also organizes festivals, discussion forums, and memorials in cooperation with local and national groups.

 

In 2009, the UN put a special focus on the role of and need for women in peacekeeping, both as role models and also to serve in a number of gender-specific capacities.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Day_of_United_Nations_Peacekeepers

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May 28, 2012: Memorial Day (U.S.) ~ "Attack" (Siegfried Sassoon); Dame Helen Mirren

Dame Helen Mirren reads the poem "Attack" by Siefried Sassoon in support of Peace One Day...

 

At dawn the ridge emerges massed and dun
In the wild purple of the glow'ring sun,
Smouldering through spouts of drifting smoke that shroud
The menacing scarred slope; and, one by one,
Tanks creep and topple forward to the wire.
The barrage roars and lifts. Then, clumsily bowed
With bombs and guns and shovels and battle-gear,
Men jostle and climb to, meet the bristling fire.
Lines of grey, muttering faces, masked with fear,
They leave their trenches, going over the top,
While time ticks blank and busy on their wrists,
And hope, with furtive eyes and grappling fists,
Flounders in mud. O Jesus, make it stop!

 

Source:

From Siegfried Sassoon, Collected Poems

(New York: E. P. Dutton, 1918)

 

This text is part of the Internet Modern History Sourcebook. The Sourcebook is a collection of public domain and copy-permitted texts for introductory level classes in modern European and World history.

 

Unless otherwise indicated the specific electronic form of the document is copyright. Permission is granted for electronic copying, distribution in print form for educational purposes and personal use. If you do reduplicate the document, indicate the source. No permission is granted for commercial use of the Sourcebook.

 

© Paul Halsall, July 1998
halsall@murray.fordham.edu

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/sassoon-attack.asp

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May 28, 1956: Happy Birthday, Jerry Douglas! "From Ankara to Izmir"

"We found that an ensemble of three instrumental voices offers unique opportunities and challenges. First, you get to play a lot, and everything you play is of critical importance. The trio challenges and sharpens your skills by giving you responsibility. You are one third the total effort, so your playing is often exposed, if not featured. You will be sorely missed if you get lazy, and you will stick out like a sore thumb if you get sloppy. The relatively spare environment encourages playing that is rhythmically sturdy and textually interesting, yet it still provides the support and interactive stimulation that helps draw out and energize your ideas.

 

"Though demanding, a trio is extremely flexible and responsive. It is a highly conducive medium in which musical energy is easily transmitted. One player can quickly elicit response from the others, effortlessly taking the lead in imparting dynamic direction. With this degree of responsiveness, rhythm can be handled with delicacy and control. Each player has immediate access to the group's interpretation of time and phrasing. No one person dominates; each is able to influence the others. A trio inspires good listening."

 

  from "Skip, Hop & Wobble" liner notes, by Russ Barenberg; Sugar Hill Records SH-CD 3817

 

http://www.jerrydouglas.com/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerry_Douglas_(musician)

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May 28, 1956: Happy Birthday, Jerry Douglas! "Duke & Cookie"

Sam Bush, Bela Fleck, Mark O'Connor, Edgar Meyer, Jerry Douglas... Recorded 10/12/89

"The Telluride Sessions is an album recorded by five acoustic-music instrumentalists under the name Strength in Numbers and released in 1989 on MCA Records Nashville. The five members are: Sam Bush, Jerry Douglas, Béla Fleck, Mark O'Connor, and Edgar Meyer.

 

The album is progressive bluegrass with jazz structures, but also adds elements from classical music as well. O'Connor, Fleck, and Meyer further developed this genre in their compositions for orchestra and chamber music.

 

Apart from the ground-breaking musicianship, the project is also notable because each song was composed by a different pair of the artists featured. Each possible pair of musicians created one song for the album, one of the reasons for the name of the band, Strength in Numbers. [...] 'Duke and Cookie' (Bush, Douglas)" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Telluride_Sessions

 

http://www.jerrydouglas.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerry_Douglas_(musician)

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