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The Key To Social Media? Maslow's Hierarchy Of Needs Model - State of Search

The Key To Social Media? Maslow's Hierarchy Of Needs Model - State of Search | I never knew .... | Scoop.it
In today's digital marketing landscape content is king. But how do you make sure your content is right and is distributed far and wide for maximum impact? (The Key To Social Media?

Via Susan Bainbridge
Mark McMahon's insight:

although Maslow is less well-known for it, he was the originator of the idea of giving wealth away in order to make more wealth, eg, give people a free "junior" version of your software then offer a full-featured version for a fee. So, I think Maslow was a lot smarter than that old pyramid of needs thingy.

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Rescooped by Mark McMahon from Health Care Social Media Monitor
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Patient Feedback Through Social Media | HealthWorks Collective

Patient Feedback Through Social Media | HealthWorks Collective | I never knew .... | Scoop.it
Hospitals are turning to social media for advice, specifically patient feedback, via questionnaires and surveys on how they can improve their services and facilities.

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
Mark McMahon's insight:

yes that much is true, but in my experience such has lead to an over-supply of poorly designed and sometimes really upsetting surveys.....Authors forget that surveys are also psycho-social connections and marketing tools, eg, if it's a crap survey then the service it came from must be crap also...... conclude a lot of folk. 

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Marie Ennis-O'Connor's curator insight, September 1, 2013 2:31 AM

I like the idea of hospitals using  “e-advisers” such as Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston using their “e-advisers” to help edit brochures to make sure they are patient-friendly.

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Curate Real-Time News and Video with WordPress Media Explorer

Curate Real-Time News and Video with WordPress Media Explorer | I never knew .... | Scoop.it

From Robin Good's insight:

"Automattic, the company behind WordPress has just released a tool which allows WordPress users to curate real-time news coming from Twitter and YouTube video clips without ever leaving the standard WP posting dashboard..."

 

Read full Robin Good's insight below.

 

Find out more: 

http://en.support.wordpress.com/media-explorer/

 


Via Robin Good, Giuseppe Mauriello
Mark McMahon's insight:

this sounds like really useful stuff......

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Stephen Dale's curator insight, September 1, 2013 2:53 AM

Looking forward to when Media Explorer is available for self-hosted Wordpress.org users. Currently limited to WordPress.com users.

Hans Heesterbeek's curator insight, September 1, 2013 9:38 PM

This looks interesting 

Mariska Botha's comment, September 11, 2013 5:23 AM
Have to be honest that I love this...
Rescooped by Mark McMahon from Social Media Classroom
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If You Send Your Kid to Private School, You Are a Bad Person.

If You Send Your Kid to Private School, You Are a Bad Person. | I never knew .... | Scoop.it
You are a bad person if you send your children to private school. Not bad like murderer bad—but bad like ruining-one-of-our-nation’s-most-essential-institutions-in-order-to-get-what’s-best-for-your-kid bad.

Via Seth Dixon
Mark McMahon's insight:

.... but sending you kid to a governemnt school does not make you a good person.  Conclusion: today's schooling doesn't have much to do with personhood.

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Lou Salza's comment, August 30, 2013 6:38 AM
Thanks Seth. Seems this article has legs—my daughter sent it to me as well. We need to stop blaming and star taking responsibility. I respectfully suggest we stop calling them public schools. They are GOVERNMENT schools. I further suggest that some government schools are as swanky as the independent schools the author and you mention. For me it boils down to class--that is; socio-economic status (SES). But even low SES is no reason for any school anywhere, failing to teach children to read. Ever.
I am a product of public schools and I got a good education in the 1960s. There were about the same numbers of children going to private schools back then as there are now. So I don’t get it.
Further more, there are many examples of high achieving public schools in low SES communities. Those schools use interim assessment data to adjust instruction to the students in their care. The fact is lots of government schools fail to use data or apply research that would boost achievement levels. Adding wealthy students to schools who refuse to pay attention wouldn’t help much.
Our failure to teach literacy skills to children in all government schools reached a crisis about twenty years ago and has been heading down hill ever since. The failure has nothing whatever to do with SES, independent schools, or good or bad parenting decisions. In addition to the problems I cite above, another problem is that we have made core content and state curriculum standards originally intended to be a floor through which no child would fall --the aspiration for our children in government schools.
This has migrated from an educational issue to a public health emergency as more students drop out and are consigned to a life of unemployment, underemployment and poverty. Recently Condoleezza Rice and Joel Klein teamed up to author a report from a National Defense Task force indicating that 70% of the high school graduates in the USA are ineligible for military service because they can’t read or they are obese.
Lou Salza's comment, August 30, 2013 6:47 AM
In conclusion, I respectfully suggest that the author of the Slate article do some research. She might find out that the problem is more complex than her solution suggests.
Mark McMahon's comment, September 5, 2013 10:03 AM
In Australia the very top schools are government ones, but in order to get into one of these the moving of house, extra tutoring to get do well in entrance exams and be able to display broad aptitudes, could go real close to paying private school fees in the first place. In addition, because many independent schools cater to narrow sectional interests, surviving your time in one of these can be much harder than getting in or even paying the fees!!
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Notes to self on getting older - gulfnews.com

Notes to self on getting older - gulfnews.com | I never knew .... | Scoop.it
Notes to self on getting older
gulfnews.com
I wonder if it's this tendency to contrariness that has born my new hobby; scaring men. I noticed recently that there's nothing I like more than telling guys I love weight lifting.
Mark McMahon's insight:

Yes, Virginia, not only is there a Santa Claus but there are also women who like to scare men!

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Rescooped by Mark McMahon from Eclectic Technology
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Creating a Character Traits Thesaurus

Creating a Character Traits Thesaurus | I never knew .... | Scoop.it
Because my students need to have a larger repertoire of "Character Traits" to choose from when describing characters in the books we read, we are creating a Visual Thesaurus of traits using Tagul. ...

Via Beth Dichter
Mark McMahon's insight:

really takes the wind out of a Jane Austen novel.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 2, 2013 6:33 PM

This lesson plan is a great way to incorporate a range of technology into a lesson. In this case Paul Solarz (the teacher) realized that students needed to learn to use a thesaurus, and chose to have them focus on traits, as they are a key component of literature. After providing lists of character traits to the students he taught them how to use Tagel (to create the word clouds) and thesaurus.com (free online). Click through to the website to read the full post. You will also find a link to the many word clouds that were created by his students) for some of the features included within it.

If you have students whom are ELL you may want to check out wordsift.com. It uses visual thesaurus (slightly different than thesaurus.com) and has other resources that help many learners, including images that are associated with specific words, the ability to create a workspace and pull in words and images, and lists of words (such as ELA, science, math, history) so students may learn which words are important in different subjects. WordSift does not allow you to make word clouds as do the many other word cloud tools but is a valuable tool to learn to use.

Lauren Thorncraft's curator insight, May 26, 1:47 AM

This resource is a terrific educational and interactive website relevant to the English Syllabus for Stage 2 learners, and links to outcome; 

WRITING AND REPRESENTING 2

OUTCOME

A student:
› identifies and uses language forms and features in their own writing appropriate to a range of purposes, audiences and contexts EN2-7B.

 

The site explain's a lesson idea that could be used to increase student's vocabulary on how to describe character traits/characteristics when composing a writing passage or story. It allows student's to broaden their vocabulary repertoire, and gain skills to be able to compose and present well-structured and coherent texts, that include descriptive and interesting character's. 

 

This site can be used following a lesson that has just explained what traits/characteristics are (such as my IWB resource). The site encourages student's to choose a word from the 'characteristic list' (such as the one on my IWB resource). Then determine its common antonym with help from the thesaurus and create a word cloud for it using the synonyms that were listed on thesaurus.com. Additionally, the site displays a link ‘tagul.com’ which is an ICT resource which allows student’s to create ‘word clouds’. Another great tool to introduce to student’s to assist with expanding vocabulary. 


Overall, this is a great resource that will provide an opportunity for students to learn about characteristics, and accumulate a diverse repertoire of new vocabulary and hopefully assist with writing well-structured and coherent texts.

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The Key To Social Media? Maslow's Hierarchy Of Needs Model - State of Search

The Key To Social Media? Maslow's Hierarchy Of Needs Model - State of Search | I never knew .... | Scoop.it
In today's digital marketing landscape content is king. But how do you make sure your content is right and is distributed far and wide for maximum impact? (The Key To Social Media?

Via Susan Bainbridge
Mark McMahon's insight:

although Maslow is less well-known for it, he was the originator of the idea of giving wealth away in order to make more wealth, eg, give people a free "junior" version of your software then offer a full-featured version for a fee. So, I think Maslow was a lot smarter than that old pyramid of needs thingy.

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Rescooped by Mark McMahon from Health Care Social Media Monitor
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24 Outstanding Statistics on How Social Media has Impacted Health Care

24 Outstanding Statistics on How Social Media has Impacted Health Care | I never knew .... | Scoop.it
Communication has been disrupted through social media but how has the health care industry faired? Dive into an analysis of 24 statistics on the subject.

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
Mark McMahon's insight:

I just love totally unexpected statistics

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Shellfish, slavery and same-sex marriage: How not to read the Bible - ABC Online

Shellfish, slavery and same-sex marriage: How not to read the Bible - ABC Online | I never knew .... | Scoop.it
ABC Online Shellfish, slavery and same-sex marriage: How not to read the Bible ABC Online That the Bible commands a diet of only ceremonially clean food at one stage of redemptive history and then abandons this requirement when Jesus comes to...
Mark McMahon's insight:

massive amounts of the Bible contradict other massive amounts of the Bible.... and yet the whole Book is spritually inspiring. 

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