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The Mystery Of Jupiter's Great Red Spot

The Mystery Of Jupiter's Great Red Spot | I Love Atoms | Scoop.it
Jupiter's Great Red Spot is one of the solar system's most mysterious landmarks.
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“Jupiter’s Great Red Spot should have vanished a long time ago, but it’s still here”, says scientists. Many processes dissipate vortices like the Red Spot. The vortex also loses energy by radiating heat. Finally, the Red Spot sits between two strong jet streams that flow in opposite directions and may slow down its spinning. The atoms seem to slow down while these things are happening. If vortices keep losing heat, the Red Spot might disappear slowly until it’s no more. Scientists are trying to build models after this happened, and predict how long it will take until the Red Spot is just gone.

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The early universe - Symmetry magazine

The early universe - Symmetry magazine | I Love Atoms | Scoop.it
The early universe
Symmetry magazine
Quarks and gluons began clumping together to form protons and neutrons, which then began to form nuclei. Illustration by: Sandbox Studio, Chicago.
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Although everyone has heard that stars has always been there, they actually took 10 billion years just to get from their birthplace to Earth. The mission for particle physicists, physicians who all study particles, is to find out what happened seconds after the Big Bang. Scientists are doing everything they can to get as much information as possible to figure out when the universe will eventually end. The universe began as a big ball of particles and Higgs boson, more commonly referred to as dark matter. They then eventually expanded into hyperspace (universe).  After that, were stars expanding, galaxies forming, and the universe getting massive. The scientists are doing hypotheses on what happened on those first moments of the universe.

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Will Fusion Energy Become Viable? - About - News & Issues

Will Fusion Energy Become Viable? - About - News & Issues | I Love Atoms | Scoop.it
Will Fusion Energy Become Viable? About - News & Issues The nucleus of a hydrogen contains only a single proton, but if you are able to get two hydrogen nuclei to fuse together then you have a helium atom with two protons in the atomic nucleus, and...
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          It seems that scientists are trying to figure out how to make fusion energy possible. In Europe, they are trying to test this project out by using either magnetic confinement fusion and/or inertial fusion. This is the only way right now to find out what they can do. To stimulate what happened, they use the atom of hydrogen. The atom hydrogen has one proton, because they think it’s possible  due to the famous equation, e=mc2. Some scientists agree with this, and they decided to continue with this project. To do this, you must have plasma, gas, solids, and liquids

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Cornell researcher's ultra-thin glass is 2 atoms thick - Shreveport Times

Cornell researcher's ultra-thin glass is 2 atoms thick - Shreveport Times | I Love Atoms | Scoop.it
Cornell researcher's ultra-thin glass is 2 atoms thick
Shreveport Times
University scientists, led by David A.
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            The thinnest piece of glass, which was composed of only two atoms, one of silicon, and one of oxygen, was found by a University of Scientists. When scientists found out about this, they suddenly got to be on Guinness Book of World Records. Some researchers wanted to go a step further. Bending the super special glass was initially thought to be impossible, but they eventually achieved it. The researchers saw that the atoms were wiggling and jiggling around, and how to deform the super special glass.  Now that scientists know that there is this type of glass, they want to know if they can thin it down even further.

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Greenland Ice Sheet Was Smallest When Ocean Was Warm - LiveScience.com

Greenland Ice Sheet Was Smallest When Ocean Was Warm - LiveScience.com | I Love Atoms | Scoop.it
LiveScience.com Greenland Ice Sheet Was Smallest When Ocean Was Warm LiveScience.com To figure out that rate, the team dated some of the marine fossils using a technique involving carbon isotopes, or elements of carbon with different numbers of...
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Greenland has the second-largest ice sheet in the whole world right now. However, was that the same case 10,000 years ago? The answer to that trick question is no, because 10,000 years ago, the temperature around Greenland was hotter than the one today. This is due to global warming. Global warming back then caused the Greenland Ice Sheet to melt by half its original size 10,000 years ago. This is because of amino acids below the surface of the ice sheet that melts the ice on top of the surface. Carbon isotopes were also found in the amino acids which made the melting rate faster.

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Black Hole Jets Contain Heavy Metal Atoms

Black Hole Jets Contain Heavy Metal Atoms | I Love Atoms | Scoop.it
Astronomers find that the accelerated jets propelled from a black hole contain charged metal atoms.

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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Some scientists seem to think that black holes contain heavy metals. Like all the other black holes out there in the universe, they seem to emit a light after absorbing a very huge star. However, in those lights, scientists think that there are highly charged particles. Researchers thought that the jets of light seemed to be completely made of negatively charged atoms, but now they’re thinking that there are positively charged atoms in some places, too. Scientists came up with the hypothesis that the jets of light being scattered were nearly two-thirds the speed of light. Scientists are now trying to find out if this happens to all the other black holes too.

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Protons wander freely in icy gas giant cores | Chemistry World

Protons wander freely in icy gas giant cores | Chemistry World | I Love Atoms | Scoop.it
It has been previously proposed that this ice might enter a 'superionic' phase in which there are relatively mobile hydrogen ions that can support proton currents and give rise to magnetic fields. The new findings ...
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          When you squeeze ice hard enough, some of its protons fall off into the ground. This was stated to be correct when Malcolm Guthrie of Carnegie Institute of Washington and colleagues. Neptune and other gas giants have more ice than what NASA has thought previously. In the depths of earth’s lower mantle, they found out that protons in the ice become separated and fill up the space they were in. This is called the ‘superionic’ state of ice, and that with deionization, it could be reversed. The scientists also found out that if you squeeze ice, the hydrogen atoms will sit midway between the two oxygen atoms 

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When did the first stars form - 750 million years after the Big Bang

When did the first stars form - 750 million years after the Big Bang | I Love Atoms | Scoop.it
An artist’s rendering of the quasar 3C 279 (credit: European Southern Observatory) Determining when stars first started to form through out the early U
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The universe started as a big ball of gas, and exploded into what is now popularly called the ‘Big Bang’.  Scientists say that the very first stars were alive when the universe was only 750,000,000 year old. Until now, scientists were only able to go as far as 1,000,000,000 years into the past, but are trying to learn more. Scientists then found quasars, a massive ball of emanating energy from stars. In the beginning of the universe, the dark matter and energy created from the big bang split apart, and helium, hydrogen, proton, and neutrons. The very first stars were made from these objects.

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