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JC Penney is tanking after terrible sales, outlook

JC Penney is tanking after terrible sales, outlook | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Shares of retailer JC Penney are tanking Friday morning after the company painted a gloomy outlook for the rest of 2016.
The company posted a loss of -$0.22 per share against analyst expectations of -$0.30 a share. Sales, however, fell far short of expectations, generating $2.81 billion, just shy of the projected $2.92 billion. Comparable store sales also declined -0.4% against analyst expectations of a 3.3% increase.
In addition, the retailer slashed its projections for the year. JC Penney cut its outlook for gross margins to an increase of only 0.1% to 0.3% from the original projection of 0.4% to 0.6%.
"While our first quarter sales were below our expectations, we are maintaining our annual comp guidance of 3% to 4% as a result of the positive nature of our recent sales trends, the strength of our Sephora business and our decision to accelerate our appliance rollout," said CEO Marvin Ellison in a press release accompanying earnings.
In response to the news, shares of the company are diving in pre-market trading. As of 7:42 a.m. ET, the stock was down a little over 13% at $6.76 a share.
Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Here's what it feels like to drink the hallucinogenic Amazonian brew ayahuasca
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5 Brands That Nailed Push Notifications This Mother's Day

5 Brands That Nailed Push Notifications This Mother's Day | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Oh, Mother’s Day. The greeting card holiday that always manages to sneak up on you and leaves you scrambling to figure out what to get Mom last minute. Seems like a perfect opportunity for mobile marketers to flex their muscles and come to the rescue with gift ideas, right? Well, many did, and nailed it.
1. Macy's
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From Unorganized Retail To Controlled Fulfillment - How Indian E-Commerce Is Evolving

From Unorganized Retail To Controlled Fulfillment - How Indian E-Commerce Is Evolving | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Kunal Bahl and Rohit Bansal, co-founders of Indian marketplace Snapdeal, recently sat down with the team from venture capital fund Andreessen Horowitz to discuss the e-commerce scene in their country.
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How Sound Will Shape The Advertising Industry

How Sound Will Shape The Advertising Industry | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
LISNR is making a bet that using sound as a data delivery system can radically change how marketers access audiences and what value they can then add.
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Millennials Place Work/Life Balance Before Career Progression [Infographic]

Millennials Place Work/Life Balance Before Career Progression [Infographic] | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
A new reportfrom Deloitte has found that the world's Millennials express little loyalty to their employers and feel that the majority of businesses have little motivation beyond profit. It also found that many Millennials are planning near-term exits from their employers while placing their personal values and interests ahead of [...]
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Email Spells Disaster For Leadership Connection

Email Spells Disaster For Leadership Connection | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Employees crave real connection with their leaders.
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Three Reasons Why Kohl's Shoppers Aren't Ready For Apply Pay

Three Reasons Why Kohl's Shoppers Aren't Ready For Apply Pay | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Heading off its dismal report of a 3.9% same-store sales decline for Q1 2016, Kohl's, the retail favorite of discount-loving shoppersnationwide, recently made a technological splash with the announcement that they were simplifying the brick-and-mortar purchase process by linking Kohl'sstore credit cards and its Yes2You rewards program together under Apply [...]
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Is 'Smart Beta' Investing Still Smart After Taxes?

Is 'Smart Beta' Investing Still Smart After Taxes? | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
In my new book The Overtaxed Investor, I conclude that smart beta investing is still smart after taxes. How is that working for you lately? Let’s pop open the hood and take a look.
Note: I’ve always hated the term “smart beta” because, as my pal Ben Stein says, if something is advertised as smart, it is generally being sold to people who are stupid. Not here. I think smart beta approaches actually are smart.
These factors attempt to capitalize on established market risk factors or anomalies that historically have yielded higher returns than the market as a whole. While academic researchers have discovered a whole Jurassic Park full of factors in the big factor zoo, some of the more popular ones include:
Small Company: small companies tend to do better than large companies, on average, over time.
Value: low priced stocks (relative to book value, earnings, dividends, etc.) do better than high priced stocks.
Quality: high quality (profitable) companies do better than low quality companies even after accounting for their higher initial share prices.
Momentum: stocks that are going up tend to continue to go up.
Low Volatility: stocks that are not very volatile tend to do better than stocks whose price movements are more volatile.
In Wall Street’s gotta-have-a-gimmick world, these factors have been conveniently packaged into exchanged-traded funds for your shopping pleasure. But before we back up the truck, let us pause to consider Cliff Asness’s apothegm: There is no investment product so great that a fee cannot make it bad. The fee I want to highlight here is the one paid to the tax collector.
Morningstar’s website has a nifty tax analysis feature that lets you punch in a fund ticker and see the impact of taxes on its total returns. Here is what it looks like when I plug in some ‘smart-beta’ exchange-traded funds.

Factor
Ticker
1 Year Tax Cost
1 Year A/T Return
Small Company
VB
0.62%
-4.50%
Value
VTV
0.87%
0.35%
Quality
QUAL
0.52%
3.85%
Momentum
MTUM
0.31%
5.28%
Low Volatility
SPLV
0.68%
9.39%
Multi-Factor

0.60%
2.87%
S&P 500
SPY
0.62%
0.50%
Total Stock Market
VTI
0.47%
-1.70%

These data run for the twelve months ending 4/30/2016. We see that different tax costs act as a drag on each one. Value stocks are the worst offenders, because they pay the highest dividends. While I always thought momentum stocks would be a tax powder keg, this turns out to be not only wrong but backwards: because they are always selling losers along the way, momentum’s capital gains net out to be much more friendly than buy-and-hold strategies.
An equally-weighted multi-factor portfolio clocks in with a total tax cost 0.60%, compared to a vanilla factor-neutral S&P 500 index fund at 0.62%, and just a bit higher than the total US stock market at 0.47%.
Meanwhile, after tax, the multi-factor portfolio performed significantly better: up 2.9% for the trailing 12 months versus 0.5% for the S&P 500 and -1.7% for the total stock market fund. These performance numbers are inclusive of the funds’ expense ratios.
That’s my story and I’m sticking to it: factor investing still works even in the taxable accounts of tax-sensitive, high bracket investors. It works even better than the table says, because Morningstar assumes that Joe Taxpayer is getting shaved a mere 15% on dividends and capital gains. As if! High bracket investors are paying 33% in California, 31.5% in New York, and 25% even in zero-tax states like Texas and Florida.
While their relative returns will bounce up and down with the tape, it looks to this observer like smart-beta approaches can be run without undue tax liability compared to their index fund cousins. Park the tax-intensive value stocks in your IRA and the tax-friendly momentum stocks in your brokerage account and you can come out even further ahead.
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Competitive Markets Need A Neutral Referee, Not A Cheerleader

Competitive Markets Need A Neutral Referee, Not A Cheerleader | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
By Susan E. Dudley & Sofie E. Miller
Since the creation of the first regulatory agency in 1887, regulations have had a significant influence on marketplace competition. Although [tweet_quote display=”Some regs seek to improve competition by restraining monopolies, others reduce competition by regulating prices.”]some regulations seek to improve competition by restraining monopolies, others reduce competition by regulating prices,[/tweet_quote] establishing one-size-fits-all standards for products, or acting as non-tariff barriers to trade.
Competition Benefits Consumers
Recognizing the importance of competition at protecting consumers, President Obama recently signed an executive order instructing federal agencies to identify and address barriers to competition. The order asks them to “identify specific actions that they can take in their areas of responsibility to address undue burdens on competition,” and, by May 15, 2016, submit to the Director of the National Economic Council an initial plan “to promote competition, arm consumers and workers with the information they need to make informed choices, and eliminate regulations that restrict competition without corresponding benefits to the American public.”
From left: Neil Eggleston, White House Counsel, Jason Furman, Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers, Jeff Zients, Director of the National Economic Council, and President Barack Obama. (Photo credit: BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
This is a welcome announcement. As the Council of Economic Advisers’ (CEA) issue brief accompanying the order notes, “a long line of economic literature argues that competition among firms benefits consumers via lower prices.” This was most evident from the U.S. experience in the 1970s and 1980s, when bipartisan efforts across all three branches of government eventually led to the abolition of whole agencies such as the Civil Aeronautics Board and the Interstate Commerce Commission, and removal of unnecessary regulation in several previously-regulated industries, with resulting improvements in innovation and consumer welfare.
Deregulation Enables Competition
Unfortunately, the CEA brief does not mention this historical experience nor acknowledge that the government action that brought about these gains for consumers was deregulation. Consequently, it misses an opportunity to remind us what we learned the hard way—that [tweet_quote display=”Regulation of private sector prices, entry & exit tends to benefit regulated industries, often at consumers’ expense.”]regulation of private sector prices, entry and exit tends to benefit the regulated industries, often at the expense of consumers.[/tweet_quote] The removal of economic regulation in the telecommunications and transportation sectors increased consumer choice and aligned service quality with customer preferences. Competitive markets have generated real gains—and not just reallocated benefits—for consumers and for society as a whole, while markets have evolved in beneficial ways that were not anticipated prior to deregulation.
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Entertainment industry pressuring web giants over piracy

Entertainment industry pressuring web giants over piracy | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Internet giants, such as Facebook or Google, might end up being forced to crack down on piracy within their systems, or face consequences, the media is reporting on Monday. That is, if their own methods of combating piracy prove to be inefficient. According to a Times report this morning, civil servants at the Intellectual Property […]
The post Entertainment industry pressuring web giants over piracy appeared first on ITProPortal.
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Dying for Intelligent Calendar Awareness

Dying for Intelligent Calendar Awareness | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
What would we die for in an integrated DevOps tooling solution—something that would make our operations partners stand up and cheer? Intelligent calendar awareness. The most fundamental construct of any release orchestrations (RO) tooling software is the calendar. RO software, no matter who the vendor is, uses a form of the calendar, to outline what […]
The post Dying for Intelligent Calendar Awareness appeared first on DevOps.com.
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8 Signs of a Great Non-profit Strategy

8 Signs of a Great Non-profit Strategy | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
When I work with clients on strategy, one of my greatest responsibilities is to shift their thinking so they can look at things in new ways, step up to a higher plane, and think big. Boards of Directors and staff alike are usually too mired in today's challenges to envision [...]
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2017 Honda Ridgeline: For SUV Buyers Needing A Truck, Or Truck Buyers Needing An SUV? Yes

2017 Honda Ridgeline: For SUV Buyers Needing A Truck, Or Truck Buyers Needing An SUV? Yes | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Photo courtesy American Honda
Slide into the all-new 2017 Honda Ridgeline and your first impression will probably be, “Wow, this is a roomy cabin for a truck.” Start driving the Ridgeline and you’re second impression will quickly be, “Hmm, awfully good ride quality for a truck.” Spend time exploring all the innovative design elements of the Ridgeline, from the cargo area underneath its bed to the advanced driver aids like lane-keeping assist, radar cruise control and brake mitigation, and you’re third impression will be, “This has a lot of unique features for a truck.”
Photo courtesy American Honda
This is because the Honda Ridgeline is the least trucky truck you can buy. In fact, it’s been said the first-generation Honda Ridgeline, sold between 2006 and 2014, was “the truck for people who don’t want a truck.” That might sound like a back-handed compliment, and with past Ridgeline sales averaging about 25,000 units a year it wasn’t the best-selling midsize truck on the market. But much of the last Ridgeline’s sales challenges were driven by economic factors that had nothing to do with it (basically, all trucks struggled for sales in the late 2000s). And in spite of its sales challenges Honda never wavered from extending the Ridgeline into a second, all-new version.
Photo courtesy American Honda
That’s a good thing for both truck and SUV shoppers, because the 2017 Honda Ridgeline builds on the last model’s unique blend of open-bed towing and hauling capabilities paired with SUV-like ride, handling and practical features. At Kelley Blue Book we see more shopping activity around trucks and SUVs than any other vehicle segment. A single model that offers the best of both vehicle types? Probably not a bad idea. In fact, of the 250,000 first-generation Ridgelines still in operation 175,000 remain with their original owners. The vehicle also won multiple industry awards during its production run, including North American Truck of the Year. So it would appear this merged truck-SUV concept has some legs.
Photo courtesy American Honda
Of course calling the Ridgeline an “open-bed Pilot” would make Honda’s engineers cringe. The differences between the two vehicles go far beyond the back half of its body shell. The new truck’s outer shape not only looks more truck-like than the last Ridgeline, it also features a longer and wider bed (5.5 inches bigger in both directions) bolted to a dedicated and reinforced cabin built around Honda’s trademark ACE (Advanced Compatibility Engineering) body structure. Honda even reinforced the rear cabin wall to keep cargo in the bed from piercing the passenger cell during a forward collision. The automaker expects the Ridgeline to earn top safety scores from both NHTSA and IIHS.
Photo courtesy American Honda
Other structural elements dedicated to truck duty include all-new independent front and rear suspensions with Ridgeline-specific hubs, bearings, control arms and dampers. These combine with upgraded unibody mounts and strengthened body joints to increase the Ridgeline’s torsional rigidity by 28 percent compared to the previous model. Honda also worked to reduce cabin noise, vibration and harshness through upgraded body seals and insulation.
Photo courtesy American Honda
This degree of cabin reinforcement manifested in two ways. First, during on-road driving we found the Ridgeline’s cabin quiet and its ride quality very un-truck-like (i.e. smooth and refined, even over freeway expansion joints or rough pavement). Second, during off-road driving the Ridgeline again offered a composed ride on smaller bumps while displaying no creaking and groaning under extreme conditions (such as deep, offset ruts or transitions from flat ground to steep climbs). Competitive midsize trucks from Chevrolet and Toyota were available for back-to-back comparisons, making the benefits of unibody construction quite clear.
Photo courtesy American Honda
After multiple off-road excursions I’m confident the Ridgeline is every bit as rugged and capable as traditional body-on-frame trucks. Unfortunately, I’m also confident the Honda’s smooth ride and refined nature will cause old-school truck buyers to question its “truckness” because many of them feel a quiet, non-bouncy ride is indicative of structural weakness. That’s unfortunate because the Ridgeline’s tow and haul specs are impressive, with a maximum payload of 1,584 pounds and a max tow rating of 5,000 pounds.
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Macy's cut its earnings guidance and shares are tumbling (M)

Macy's cut its earnings guidance and shares are tumbling (M) | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Macy's cut its forecast for earnings this year in its quarterly results out Wednesday.
Its expectations for profits are now lower because people just aren't shopping in malls like they used to.
The retailer now sees adjusted earnings per share (EPS) in a range of $3.15 to $3.40, lower than the previous guidance for $3.80 to $3.90, and less than the estimate for $3.81.
Macy's shares fell by as much as 7% in pre-market trading.
Here's what CEO Terry Lundgren said in the earnings statement (emphasis ours):
We are seeing continued weakness in consumer spending levels for apparel and related categories. In particular, our sales trend relative to expectations meaningfully slowed beginning in mid-March, and first quarter results are below our original outlook. Headwinds also are coming from a second consecutive year of double-digit spending reductions by international visitors in major tourist markets where Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s are key destinations, as well as a slowdown in some center core categories – further intensifying the challenges associated with growing topline sales revenue.
Macy's said it is looking into proposals from potential partners that want to enter joint ventures involving its mall stores and other flagship locations. Meanwhile, it will continue to look for ways to generate revenues from "unproductive real estate," the company said.
In January, Macy's said as many as 3,000 employees would be impacted by a restructuring process; about 165 senior executives at Macy's and Bloomingdale's had the opportunity to voluntarily leave. It also listed 40 stores to be closed.
Macy's reported adjusted EPS of $0.40 for the first quarter, beating the forecast for $0.36. Its net sales fell for a fifth straight quarter and totaled $5.8 billion, lower than analysts' forecast on Bloomberg for $5.93 billion.
Comparable-store sales — at locations open for at least one year —fell 6.1% an owned basis, more than the forecast for a 3.1% drop.

Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: The famous #FollowMeTo Instagram couple who travel the world together are the new faces of one of Macy's brands
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Cross-Component Lineage Apache Hadoop

Cross-Component Lineage Apache Hadoop | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Apache Hadoop® exists within a broader ecosystem of enterprise analytical packages. This includes ETL tools, ERP and CRM systems, enterprise data warehouses, data marts and others. Modern workloads flow from these various traditional analytical sources into Hadoop and then often back out again.
What dataset came from which system, when and how did it change over time? The ability to answer these questions, manage the chain of custody and track cross component lineage of specific data is critical for meeting enterprise compliance and audit requirements.
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How to Use Spring Boot for Serverless Computing

How to Use Spring Boot for Serverless Computing | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Serverless Computing is a relatively new technology which allows developers to build event-driven code which scales and for which you only pay the time it’s running. OpenWhisk is IBM’s serverless computing offering hosted on Bluemix.
With OpenWhisk developers can implement actions via JavaScript, Swift and Docker. Via Docker other programming languages like Java can be used. This article describes how you can use Spring Boot to develop an action, how to build a Docker image, and how to register and trigger the serverless action.
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Shasta Ventures partner on the 'brain damage' that happens when a startup's value crashes

Shasta Ventures partner on the 'brain damage' that happens when a startup's value crashes | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Nihkil Basu Trivedi got his start as an entrepreneur early: in 2009, during his sophomore year at Princeton, he founded a startup called Artsy that helps art collectors find contemporary works. Artsy is still going strong today with over 100 employees.
He joined Shasta Ventures in 2012, where he focuses on consumer tech startups, plus education, health care, and other areas of interest.
We talked to Basu Trivedi — that's his full last name — for our feature on what happens now that Silicon Valley has moved out of its latest easy-money boom cycle.
Here's a lightly edited version of our conversation:
Business Insider: Describe what's going on right now in Silicon Valley. Is there a big change afoot?
Basu Trivedi: The venture community has realized that a number of companies were funded at valuations that were far ahead of their fundamental progress as businesses, and that some of those companies are not actually that great fundamental businesses ... The ones that are not great might ultimately be zeros, so a bunch of people are going to lose a lot of money. The ones that actually might be great might still be able to survive as a result of that, but their last round valuation is a potential handicap to them being able to survive because they might need another round to survive.
A number of companies will fail because they won't be able to raise a next round, they're just not great businesses, they're being outcompeted, they're losing money on every order.
BI: What about raising a down round? Can't companies do that as a last-ditch effort to survive?
Basu Trivedi: Sometimes the gap is so wide, and there are so many egos around the table, that just doesn't happen. Or instead of doing the brain damage associated with a down round and a total recap [recapitalization], they just sell the business.
A lot of companies will survive because they scrapped together a round, and some of those rounds will be recaps. I've heard of companies already that have gone from valuations in the tens or hundreds of millions of dollars at the last round, to being in the single-digit millions pre.
BI: Does it matter if you recap? What's so bad about it? Doesn't it give the company a chance to survive?
Basu Trivedi: Often a recap is associated with a RIF [reduction in force], either pre the downround or concurrently with the downround. The business is not doing as well as it should be, it's not performed for whatever reason. There are often layoffs associated with it.
That phrase, brain damage, gets used over and over again when it comes to recap.

The key, though — what everybody has in their minds when they do a down round or a recap — is how do we make sure that the people around the table after that are incentivized to go for it? There's often a new option pool created as well, so that's even more dilution to existing investors, all the preferences get reset.
That phrase, brain damage, gets used over and over again when it comes to recap. You have to rally all troops to do it again.
It's particularly tough on employees who have left the company, exercised their options, bought shares, and those are all — if they're not worthless, then you're way underwater on that.
BI: Almost like starting over again?
Basu Trivedi: Yes. And that's almost how investors evaluate it. If you do a total recap at 10 million-pre [a $10 million valuation, before the added money of the new round] do we think it has 10x potential at 10-pre? Or 20x potential at 10-pre?
Say you've already as an investor put in 5 million bucks or 10 million bucks into a company, that's all gone anyway. That's sunk costs. The mentality of doing a downround recap is it's effectively a whole new investment. That's one way we've approached these kinds of decisions at Shasta, and I know how other firms have approached it. Pretend this is a brand new company....would we do it as a whole new investment?
But there's also shiny brand new company that just came out of YC that's raising at that exact same valuation. So the decision becomes, do you recap this thing that's got maybe a bunch of customers, technology, legacy stuff built, but you're recapping the whole thing and there's all the brain damage associated with that, or instead do you make a brand new investment in the brand new shiny thing, that's been around for only 6 months and is growing nicely, at same price?
BI: What about companies that sell mostly to other startups and their employees? Catering companies? Fancy bars? Real estate companies?
Basu Trivedi: If you talk to the investors who were around as the last dot-com bust of 2000 happened, there were a ton of businesses back then that were selling to startups.
There are good businesses that have SMBs [small-to-mid-size businesses], startups as customers, that are recurring revenue businesses that are must haves for those companies. You can't just get rid of payroll system or your HR function to cut costs. Obviously if you die, you churn.
We very much prioritize companies if they are selling into startups whether they're core, they're must-haves, they're daily habits and behaviors, versus things that might be just nice-to-haves.
BI: Have you been involved with or heard of companies cutting costs, cutting the nice-to-haves?
Basu Trivedi: I don't have a good top-of-mind example for you. My intuition suggests it's definitely happening...It's got to happen. There are so many companies that are burning over 500k a month, that means they're burning a million every two months. A million dollars is a lot of money.
BI: Where do you cut? How do founders make those decisions?
Tons of companies have been putting together RIF plans in last 3 to 6 months.
Basu Trivedi: The more impactful decisions if you look at burn are not food every day, they're people. So you start thinking about where do we trim? Where do we have fat in our organization, and the first to go is the trimming of the fat. Then in some cases, to make the business work, you have to go deeper into the muscle, and all the way close to the bone.
Then it becomes prioritization, we look at engineering, and marketing, and customer success, and sales and all the different functions. Who are the strongest performers and not the strongest?
Tons of companies have been putting together RIF plans in last 3 to 6 months. And a lot of those are first-time founders who have never done a RIF before, so there's a ton of inertia and worry if we make RIF and we're going to lose our growth engines. Because were going to cut these couple marketing people. Or we're going to cut engineering and that means our product's not going to get better at the pace it needs to get better. That's where the really tough discussions happen with the board.
BI: When you look at potential investments, is there more scrutiny today?
Basu Trivedi: Yes, there's more scrutiny today than there was 12 months ago around the fundamentals of the business.
I think 12 months ago, I don't know if we invested in companies based on this, but we certainly took seriously some companies that we wouldn't take as seriously today. Because we were kind of worried about the unit economics 12 months ago, but maybe we felt like the consumer pain point was so huge, and the potential for it to grow explosively high, so we might have overlooked unit economics. Where today we are focused on the unit economics/gross margin question.
...Obviously, there's going to be less on-demand company investments. It's partly because of this unit economics question. It's also because people are looking at a company like Uber and Uber Eats and the things that it can do and realizing, man, when you have economies of scale, it's really hard to compete.
BI: When will things recover? How will this play out?
Basu Trivedi: Quoting our partner Doug Pepper — It's not like there are dark clouds. There's so much fundamental innovation that's going to happen in the next couple of years...
Autonomous transportation, that has the potential to generate trillions of dollars of value across so many industries, also lead to a lot of lost value for incumbents that are going to be disrupted...A lot of interesting stuff around consumer finance, around health and medicine...
What Doug said, "it's not as if there are dark clouds, it's just that the rainbows have gone away."
BI: Any bright side to all this?
Basu Trivedi: Hiring might become a little easier. If you have raised money then there's potentially less competition. It's more of a moat than it was. That's like a haves vs. have-nots situation. That's good for the haves.
BI: Any good news for the have-nots?
Basu Trivedi: If you look at it historically, the best time to start the next generational company has always been out of the ashes of correction.
BI: How long will it go on?
Basu Trivedi: I think we're going to be in this mode for next year and a half to two years. I don't see that changing because exits are not going to suddenly flood in. Everyone's being measured right now.

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Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: We dare you to oversleep with Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson’s new motivational alarm clock app
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Mobile technology contributions to development in the fintech sector

Mobile technology contributions to development in the fintech sector | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
From Africa to Asia, access to finance is vital to unlocking growth and development. Mobile technology is the key and with just about 62 per cent of the world’s population having a bank account, according to the reports from World Bank, mobile money has a lot of room for extraordinary development. In the year 2011, […]
The post Mobile technology contributions to development in the fintech sector appeared first on ITProPortal.
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How Cutting Database Management Systems Costs Can Spur Digital Innovation

How Cutting Database Management Systems Costs Can Spur Digital Innovation | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
The ability to invest in strategic digital initiatives is one of the most important enterprise needs today. At least three factors contribute to the flexibility needed for such investments. The fourth is the culmination of the first three and is the centerpiece of this post -- savings on database management systems investments that can be redirected towards the enterprise’s digital needs. These can be defined as the use of new technologies such as social, mobile, analytics, cloud, and embedded sensors (i.e. the Internet of Things).
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Uber’s CEO bites tongue on Apple giving Chinese rival $1bn

Uber’s CEO bites tongue on Apple giving Chinese rival $1bn | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Apple's $1bn investment in China's Didi Chuxing may be a blow for Uber, but company chief Travis Kalanick is paying it coy on how he really feels about the deal. The news that the Cupertino giant was making the single largest investment in the Chinese taxi-summoning service, which boasts more than 87-percent of the market for ride-sharing and over 99-percent … Continue reading
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Confusion as a Service Is Ruling The Container Land

Confusion as a Service Is Ruling The Container Land | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Containers as a Service, often referred to CaaS, is the latest delivery model of cloud computing. It involves exposing the entire container management platform as a hosted service, delivered through a self-service model. Similar to IaaS that exposes the building blocks of infrastructure, and PaaS, which delivers the runtime and [...]
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Can Trend In Home Improvement Help Home Depot?

Can Trend In Home Improvement Help Home Depot? | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
If you’ve watched any of those popular home improvement or flip-this-house TV programs, you might be thinking the do-it-yourself industry is one of those few retail segments that is ringing up higher sales. You might be right. When Home Depot reports its Q1 results before the bell Tuesday, the numbers will be on the saw table for all to see.
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Shaking Up Customer Engagement In Hospitality With Hilton

Shaking Up Customer Engagement In Hospitality With Hilton | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Most of us can't conceptualize life before digital. In the old days people looking for a hotel would drive down the road. If the hotel was all booked up, they would drive on down the road to the next hotel. Enter Hilton, a 96 year old brand that has innovated at every turn. In the 1950s Hilton wanted to make it easier for customers to book rooms and created the world's first central reservations office where customers could book over the phone, telegram or teletype. The office consisted of a team of eight “agents” who would write on a chalk board to book reservations. How times have changed! In this week’s modern customer podcast we talk with Mark Weinstein, Senior Vice President and Global Head of Loyalty and Partnerships for Hilton Worldwide.
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Taking A Market-Driven Approach To The Evolution Of Diversity & Inclusion

Taking A Market-Driven Approach To The Evolution Of Diversity & Inclusion | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) was a hot button issue during the last two Academy Award seasons, but in between things went back to the status quo and no real momentum was gained. There are people, however, who do make D&I their business year round, not just when it makes headlines or comes to the fore when given a stage like the Oscars. One of those people is Caroline Wanga. As Vice President, Diversity & Inclusion / Corporate Social Responsibility at Target, Wanga is responsible for driving organizational change in support of the retailer’s inclusion efforts – both within the company and throughout the communities they serve. From her frontline perspective, Wanga has not just seen D&I evolve as we first came to know it in American enterprise, but she helps drive that evolution at Target and in the industry today. When talking about this evolution, the first thing she points out is that there is a common theme, whether we are talking about Diversity & Inclusion past, present or future. That common theme is in the concept of systems.
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Former Sun Microsystems CEO Scott McNealy's New Focus On Social Media Innovation

Former Sun Microsystems CEO Scott McNealy's New Focus On Social Media Innovation | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
When one thinks about the companies that laid the foundation of the commercial internet, one thinks of companies like Cisco, AOL, IBM, and Sun Microsystems, among others. Sun was co-founded by Scott McNealy, who did not have a technical background, and yet ran one of the most successful tech-centric companies of ‘80s and ‘90s. The company created Java , Solaris Unix, and the Network File System to name three of many products designed by the company. Oracle purchased Sun Microsystems in 2010 for $7.4 billion, and since then, McNealy has invested in and advised a number of technology companies from his home-base in Silicon Valley.
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