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Null collections/arrays from MVC model binding

Null collections/arrays from MVC model binding | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
I’m firmly in the camp of the Framework Design Guidelines guidance on collection properties and return values: DO NOT return null values from collection properties or from methods returning collections.
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I'm only responsible for what I say not for what you understand.
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Five Principles to Run a Digital IT ~ Walk the Talk.

Five Principles to Run a Digital IT ~ Walk the Talk. | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Principles are statements of values. Things that define why one make a decision one way or another. These core decision values guide the behavior of individuals within an organization.
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Qpid Dispatch Router Installation On Your Linux Machine - DZone IoT

Qpid Dispatch Router Installation On Your Linux Machine - DZone IoT | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
A tutorial on how to install a Qpid router on your linux computer. Qpid can be used to send messages between multiple devices.
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The inside story of Apple's forgotten project to change how we explore the world from our computers

The inside story of Apple's forgotten project to change how we explore the world from our computers | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Years before Google and Oculus started daydreaming about virtual reality, Apple already had a “VR” product on the market.
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Donald Trump keeps giving Republicans major cause for alarm — because he's still attacking them

He said he wouldn't say it.
But Donald Trump seemingly couldn't resist.
"I wonder if I could say — you know, remember lyin'. Lyin'. I won’t say ‘Lyin' Ted' — I refuse to say it," he told a crowd during a Friday rally in Fresno, California.
“Lyin’ Ted!" Trump then exclaimed. "Holds that Bible high, puts it down, and then he lies. Lyin’ Ted. Well, I’m going to retire that from Ted — I’m not going to call Ted that anymore."
Trump had resurrected perhaps his most infamous moniker to discuss shifting it from Ted Cruz, the Texas senator who challenged him for the Republican nomination, to Hillary Clinton.
But the incident helped illuminate a still-signature part of Trump's campaign rallies: his insults of fellow Republicans.
The Manhattan billionaire is nearly a full month into being the GOP's presumptive nominee, but his rallies over the past week have shown that he doesn't appear to be easing up on fellow Republicans who have drawn his ire.
During a Tuesday rally in New Mexico, for example, Trump unleashed on Susana Martinez, the state's governor. Martinez is the first Latina governor in US history. And she's a Republican.
But all that didn't stop Trump for attacking Martinez — one of a handful of GOP governors who have yet to come out in support of Trump — for not attending his rally.
"We have to get your governor to get going — she’s got to do a better job, OK?" Trump said. "Your governor has got to do a better job. ... She’s not doing the job. Hey, maybe I’ll run for governor of New Mexico — I’ll get this place going. She’s not doing the job. We got to get her moving. Come on. Let’s go, governor."
GOP strategist and commentator Evan Siegfried, who is anti-Trump, wrote on Business Insider the following day that the remark showed Republicans can't trust the real-estate magnate.
He wrote:
A few days ago, Trump’s campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, made it clear to Republicans that if they distanced themselves from Trump, they would not face any retribution. This was a smart move considering how toxic Trump is with every key demographic needed to win an election. Unfortunately, it seems that Donald Trump either did not get the memo or, even worse, he decided to ignore it. The message this sends to other Republicans should be chilling: Trump cannot be taken at his word.
Later in the week, Trump homed in on two of his favorite targets that have said they will not support him: Jeb Bush, the former Florida governor and failed 2016 presidential hopeful, and Mitt Romney, the 2012 GOP nominee.
Claiming that he had "a store that's worth more money" than Romney during a Wednesday rally in Anaheim, California, Trump said if Romney would've decided to run for president in this election cycle "he would've been out quickly."
"I understand losers," Trump said of Romney.
Trump also compared Romney to several animals.
Romney "walked like a penguin around the stage," Trump said.
"He choked like a dog," Trump continued continued. "You ever see in athletics? He's a choker. And you know the truth, I hate to say it: Once a choker, always a choker. I was nasty about it."
Of Bush, Trump resurrected his "low-energy" label of the one-time 2016 presidential candidate.
"Jeb hasn't done it yet," Trump said regarding Bush endorsing his candidacy. "He will get a burst of energy, and then he will do it. He needs to get up the energy. No, Jeb has not been nice."
In that same Anaheim rally, Trump spent brief moment discussing the State Department inspector general's report faulting Clinton's email practices, saying it's "not so good."
Tony Fratto, who served as deputy press secretary during the George W. Bush administration, called Trump a "vile creature" when discussing his continued penchant for ripping Republicans.
"Look, I don't whitewash my views on this — I think there's never been a more vile creature to ever run for president than Donald Trump," Fratto told Business Insider in an interview last week. "I think too many people tend to treat him like a normal candidate and look at the things he says and does and tries to find normal explanations for them, but there aren't any normal explanations for them because he's a monster."
"And monsters don't do normal, rational things," he continued.
Fratto said he had "no earthly idea" why he would target Martinez when he needs to improve his standing among both women and Hispanics, groups with which Trump holds distinctly low favorability ratings.
"Because there is no normal idea — there is no normal, rational reason for that," he said. "It is irrational and destructive, and that's why I think ultimately, at the end of the day, that's why he loses."
Last week's NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll found that Trump has consolidated support within the party.
That poll found just 6% of Republicans surveyed said they wouldn't back Trump in the fall, while 86% responded that they'd support the presumptive Republican nominee. An ABC News/Washington Post poll found near identical results.
But Fratto said consolidating the party isn't going to be enough to win, and the constant insults will have to stop for Trump to have a shot.
"We have had the Republican Party unified for multiple elections," he said. "And the truth is we've won the popular vote in exactly one election since 1988. So in the best of times, with the best of candidates, and a unified party, we have a difficult time winning national elections."
He continued:
If you think we're going to win one with a candidate that is intent every single day to divide the party is all you need to know about why he's going to lose. The question for me isn't whether he's going to win or lose — I'm very confident he's going to lose — the question is how much damage is he going to do to the party.
How long will people like me feel like we want to be a part of a party that would nominate someone like him and have to spend all of our time explaining the really ridiculous things that he does.
Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: OBAMA: Trump’s proposals are aimed at getting 'tweets and headlines' rather than keeping America safe
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Five Tips for Managing Database Servers in Production

Five Tips for Managing Database Servers in Production | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Your web application or mobile API needs a database, so you'll likely be using apt-get install postgres or brew install postgres to get up-and-running on your laptop. When you deploy to the cloud, you'll decide to run the same command used previously. Everything should be production-ready, right? Well not quite.
There's much more to running and managing a database in production than meets the eye. This article outlines tips for managing a production database, giving you some helpful resources on how to get started.
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BMW has created 100 years worth of incredible machines — here are some of the best

BMW has created 100 years worth of incredible machines — here are some of the best | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
What can be said about BMW that hasn't been said before?
The German luxury carmaker, which celebrated its 100th birthday this year, has for its entire history released a seemingly never-ending stream of breathtaking, record-setting, and smile-inducing machines that have consistently beguiled the automotively inclined.
The essence of BMW boils down to its uncanny ability to produce successful new ideas while remaining faithful to its heritage.
And that heritage, by the way, includes innumerable victories in motorsport — on two wheels and four.
Here is the story of 100 years of BMW, one of the best brands around.The Bavarian Motor Works story begins with aircraft engines. Their IIIa radial engine quickly gained a reputation for being one of the best and most reliable of its time. Orders from the German government flooded in, overwhelming the small factory.
Now about that logo: While it is widely known as the "propeller," the blue and white center was meant to represent the Bavarian flag. It was designed by the brother of Karl Rapp, who founded BMW predecessor company Rapp Motorenwerke.
After the company was barred from building military-aircraft engines following World War I, BMW produced its first motorcycle, the R32, in 1923. It was very innovative.
While they are rarely sold, recent prices for R32s at auction include $163,000 for a 1924 model in 2009 and a $139,000 in 2011 for a 1925 model.
See the rest of the story at Business Insider
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To-Do Lists with Eclipse Tasks View

To-Do Lists with Eclipse Tasks View | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Eclipse has a cool feature which might not be known to everyone: the "To-Do" (or Tasks) List which keeps track of what I have to do:Tasks View
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Chuck Todd confronts Bernie Sanders on his superdelegate strategy: 'Isn't it a bit hypocritical?'

Chuck Todd confronts Bernie Sanders on his superdelegate strategy: 'Isn't it a bit hypocritical?' | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Chuck Todd confronted Sen. Bernie Sanders about his "hypocritical" superdelegate strategy.
In an interview on "Meet The Press" that aired on Sunday, Todd noted that Sanders is "basically contradicting" himself by urging superdelegates in states that Sanders won to represent voters from that state, while asking other superdelegates to consider polls that show Sanders beating presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump in hypothetical head-to-head general election match-ups.
"You're saying you want them to respect the vote in their state, then at the same time, you say, 'But oh, by the way, for those of you that are a superdelegate in a state that Clinton won, why don't you think about the general election?'" Todd said.
"It's a little bit hypocritical to be on both sides of those issues," he added.
Sanders said that Todd was mischaracterizing his position and maintained that his argument regarding superdelegates was that he had more "momentum and energy and enthusiasm" than Hillary Clinton and that many should not have declared their allegiance to Clinton early on.
"All that I am saying is for those superdelegates who came onboard before I was even in the race, you have got the very grave responsibility to make sure that Trump does not become elected president of the United States."
In a separate interview on "Face The Nation" on Sunday, Sanders reiterated his concerns over the Democratic primary process. The senator criticized superdelegates that pledged themselves to Clinton before other candidates got in the race and repeatedly said closed primaries that only allow registered Democrats to vote were "dumb."
"When you have a situation where 400 superdelegates came onboard Clinton's campaign before anybody else was in the race, 8 months before the first votes was cast — that's not rigged, it's just a dumb process which has certainly disadvantaged our campaign."
Despite Sanders persistence, the senator's path to winning the majority of pledged delegates before the Democratic National Convention in July appears virtually impossible.
There are still 930 pledged delegates still up for grabs. California will award the majority of the remaining delegates following its June 7 primary, according to the New York Times.
Polls show Sanders and Clinton in a tight race in the Golden State, making it incredibly difficult for Sanders to close the 270 pledged delegate gap between himself and Clinton even if he does win California. As FiveThirtyEight notes, a strong showing in New Jersey, which also awards a large chunk of delegates on June 7, could help Clinton reach the number of delegates needed to secure the nomination before the polls even close in California.
Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Watch Obama roast Trump at the White House Correspondents' Dinner
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The inside story of Apple's forgotten project to change how we explore the world from our computers (AAPL)

The inside story of Apple's forgotten project to change how we explore the world from our computers (AAPL) | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Years before Google and Oculus started daydreaming about virtual reality, Apple already had a “VR” product on the market.
Apple called it QuickTime Virtual Reality, or QuickTime VR.
It's one of the strangest projects in Apple history: Started during the years when Steve Jobs was busy with NeXT, it was ahead of the tech industry by decades but was unloved in its later years, and eventually was wound down.
"When QuickTime VR came out, it wasn't video, it was still images, and they were stitched together to create a 360 view of the world," John Sculley, who was CEO of Apple from 1983 to 1993, told Business Insider. "At the time it seemed pretty amazing."
So while QuickTime VR wasn't exactly like the immersive skydiving videos you can find on YouTube today, it was still innovative, and lessons from its development can inform the current immersive video craze that's being spearheaded by companies like Google, Facebook, and Samsung.
Here’s the story behind Apple's forgotten VR project:
Ahead of its time
QuickTime VR was designed to do many of the same things as the 360-degree videos now found on Facebook, immersing the viewer in a different physical space — or a look at a specific object — through panoramic images.
At the time, it was magic. Users could look around a virtual world simply by dragging their mouse. Today, there are thousands of YouTube videos that let you do essentially the same thing online.
But in the early 90s, when QuickTimeVR was developed in Apple's Human Interface Group, digital video cameras weren't yet at the point where they are now. There weren't 360-degree cameras like Google's Jump available either.
So the solution was to take a whole bunch of photos with a still camera, and then stitch them together to make a QuickTime panorama. Apple's QuickTimeVR was an image file format that let computers display and explore these panoramas.
"The first way I did panoramic photography was a little bit of a cheat. So what you do is, you take a million pictures and you animate between them," Dan O'Sullivan, one of the early QuickTime VR engineers and a professor at NYU, told Business Insider. "I did all this with a single camera, because imagining the matrix of cameras we now use was just too expensive."
But even when the photos were taken, it took quite a lot of computer power to stitch them together into a panorama — the kind of thing even our phones can do today.
"It was extremely onerous, the stitching and all of that. It was quite a lot of work," O'Sullivan said. Apple even had to buy a Cray supercomputer to do a lot of the processing.
Here's what the software looked like when it launched in 1995:

Years of development
QuickTime VR was actually a project in Apple's labs for years before it was officially released to the public as a stand-alone product in 1995.
In fact, in its earliest days as a research project in Apple's Human Interface Lab in 1991, it started as researchers who just wanted to play with cutting-edge technology and systems, like Apple's HyperCard. They were trying to create digital objects in 3D.
"I was just some punk intern that [Mike Mills, inventor of QuickTime] brought in, and I had these notions of what I wanted to do. So we're at something of an impasse, and I was just this little freak sitting in the corner scanning a Coca-Cola can," O'Sullivan said.
But the early experiments were wildly successful, which led to top Apple brass devoting more resources to the project, including a Cray supercomputer.
"I remember when Sally Ride — she was on the board of directors at Apple at the time — she couldn't believe it, that she could manipulate a 3D geometry in real time," Sculley said. "That was how all the stuff started."
So the Quicktime VR team, including Eric Chen, who eventually debuted the software in 1995, started to come up with a new way to stitch photographs together, and used it to photograph major landmarks using the new panorama technology. One of the first big immersive images was from the top of the Golden Gate Bridge. Apple received permission from the mayor of San Francisco to let them ascend to the top. That image can still be seen on Sullivan's NYU website today, and it was included as a demo on early QuickTime CDs.
After the Quicktime VR team did a demo at MacWorld, one of the biggest conferences at the time, the team got to go on even wilder trips to take 360-degree images — like Russia and Paris.
"When I demoed it on the stage at Macworld, Apple knew this rich woman who was important at the National Gallery. And then the National Gallery knew somebody who was important in Russia. So anyway, we were off on the plane to Russia," O'Sullivan said.
But the biggest QuickTime VR project would begin after it left Apple's research labs.
OJ Simpson
QuickTime VR first gained national attention when NBC used its technology to map Nicole Simpson's condominium complex during the OJ Simpson trial in 1995.
NBC photographed 26 different locations at Simpson's condo, using QuickTimeVR to stitch them together into 360-degree panoramas. On air, the anchor Jack Ford used those visuals to give viewers a sense of the scene.
Apple worked closely with NBC and even provided a copy of the software before it was released.
"I knew that the story of the discovery of the bodies, the blood trail, the logistics and places at OJ's house were all going to be discussed at length, and through one friend at Apple I heard a whisper of QuickTimeVR that was yet to be," David Bohrman, a technology consultant who was then executive producer of news specials at NBC, told Business Insider.
"We took a series of, maybe there were 10 or 12 locations down that walkway, which is where the blood trail was found and blood spots were found," Bohrman said. The nodes continued to "the back of the condo, where in theory it's proposed that his car or some car whisked [Simpson] away."
"Our reporter Jack Ford was able to bring up the exact geography and orient it and show what they were talking about. He could slightly zoom in, and manipulate it. It was an amazingly effective tool," Bohrman said.
After it made its debut on NBC, QuickTime VR went on to power experiences like "Star Trek: The Next Generation Interactive Technical Manual," a digital book that was distributed on CD.
Poor man's VR

It's difficult not to read about Apple's experiments with panoramic images and not draw a connection to the recent rise of 360-degree videos on platforms like Facebook and YouTube — or even the immersive aspects of services like Google Maps Street View.
Much of what's called VR these days isn't a full interactive environment, but is instead a descendant of the panoramic images that Apple pioneered.
"The head-mounted VR did exist at that time. So it was a poor man's VR. Calling it VR was controversial and somewhat presumptuous," O'Sullivan continued.
In a way, the composition aspects of immersive panoramas haven't changed a whole lot since the early 1990s — it's just easier to do these days.
"Quicktime VR was like a poor man's VR, and you know it's interesting now, I feel like there are still those two strains within VR. There's kind of the photographic VR, where you just take 360-degree video, and then there's the other kind of VR where it's more interactive," O'Sullivan said.
When Steve Jobs returned to Apple, QuickTime VR was de-emphasized. Apple put out its last QuickTime VR-specific press release in 1997, although Apple continued to use it to provide 360-degree views of new products like iPods as late as 2006. "Quicktime VR all really happened in that Scully window before Steve came back, and I think that Apple does not pay any attention to the stuff that happened during those years," Bohrman said.
Ultimately, it's not that surprising that Apple would take a shot at virtual reality — even in a rudimentary form — years before the public was ready to catch on.
"Even to this day Apple is not the most advanced technology company when it comes to data science like Google and Facebook, but it leads the world in terms of user experience," Sculley said. "We were into experiences and obviously Quicktime and Quicktime VR were great examples of that."
Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Google created a virtual reality paint brush lets you walk through your own artwork
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AWS Lambda With API Gateway

In a previous post, I showed you how to create and deploy an AWS Lambda. We will continue that work and look at updating just the code for that lambda. We will also add a REST endpoint to the AWS Lambda using AWS API Gateway.
So before you continue... if you haven't already, please follow the instruction in the previous post to make sure you have a running AWS Lambda instance.
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Moving Streaming Analytics Out of the Data Center

Moving Streaming Analytics Out of the Data Center | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
This blog focuses on moving streaming analytics outside the confines of the traditional data center. Moving streaming analytics closer to where data originates can be accomplished by leveraging an enterprise-grade data movement application, married with an extremely lightweight streaming engine. This combination is being used by forward-looking organizations to solve usage cases in a number of areas, including:Cyber Security – Identify a malicious intrusion before or as it occurs.Fraud – Analyze streaming transactions to determine which needs immediate attention.Predictive Maintenance – Predict outlier conditions from streaming machine and sensor data.Customer Experience and Marketing – Use streaming data insights to personalize interactions.Stream Data Management – Transform and clean data in motion, storing only what you need.IoAT (Internet of AnyThing) data includes any new data source generated from sensors and machines, server logs, clickstream web application servers, social media, as well as files and email. By reacting rapidly, a high degree of analytic intelligence such as IoAT data can be collected from its origin to help companies gain fast insights to outpace their competition. Whether it’s personalizing a “next best offer” or providing an immediate treatment to an early warning alert, IoAT data is only beginning to impact bottom line revenues. The time to act is now, but what components do we need to add to our modern data applications?
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The 'Nobel Prize of high school competitions' just got the most money it's received in a century from a biotech giant

The 'Nobel Prize of high school competitions' just got the most money it's received in a century from a biotech giant | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
The "Nobel Prize of high school competitions" just got the most money it's ever received in its 95 years of existence from biopharmaceutical giant Regeneron.
On Thursday at the American Museum of Natural History, Regeneron made the largest single commitment the Science Talent Search (STS), the nation’s oldest and most prestigious high school science competition, has ever received.
Oh, and Neil deGrasse Tyson was there too.
The unprecedented $100 million donation is estimated to last the next decade. This will not only double the amount of prize money given to students and schools, but will also be used to support new outreach and equity programs to reach more students across US, encouraging interest and participation in science, technology, engineering, and math research (STEM), Maya Adjmera, president and CEO of the Society for Science and the Public (SSP), told Business Insider.
The competition is the flagship program of the SSP, which promotes understanding and appreciation of science and the vital role it plays in human advancement.
“The Science Talent Search is an incubator for some of world’s greatest scientists, academics, entrepreneurs, and executives of innovative and leading companies,” Adjmera said at a press conference on Thursday. “Among its alumni are 12 Nobel Laureates, five National Medal of Science winners, and an Oscar winner.”
The real heroes
The STS has been changing the lives of high school students for nearly a century, enabling confidence, encouraging curiosity, and instilling sense of pride in being part of an important and impressive community, Adjmera said.
And the founders of Regeneron are a testament to that.
When George Yancopoulos, founding scientist and Chief Scientific Officer at Regeneron, was growing up, his heroes were famous ball players and he dreamed of becoming one. But that all changed when he started attending the Bronx High School of Science, where kids spoke in “hushed tones in the hallways about the real heroes” — students who had won what was then known as the Westinghouse Science Talent Search.
“Legend was that these kids were destined to change the world: Invent amazing things, cure disease,” Yancopoulos said at the press conference. “That changed everything for me. I had new goals. I wanted to become one of these kids. I wanted to win a Westinghouse. I wanted to become a freaking scientist and I wanted to make a real difference in the world.”
The press conference was speckled with STS alumni. Aside from Yancopoulos, who went on to become a finalist in the 1976 STS, Regeneron’s President and CEO, Len Schleifer, who also founded the company was a semifinalist in 1970 and Adjmera was a finalist in 1985.
Although Tyson, who was Yancopoulos’ friend and classmate at the Bronx High School of Science, was quick to point out that he was not a winner or semifinalist in the competition (in fact he didn’t even enter), knowing other students who were was a point of pride for him.
“The knowledge that they were doing this created a landscape of learning, an atmosphere of discovery,” Tyson said.
With this new money, Regeneron and the Society hope to expand the reach of their competition so that it doesn’t only focus on prestigious schools. They will support teachers, research labs, and grant programs, making sure to allow other schools to access to opportunities that hadn’t been there before.
“Right now the competition is dominated by the best, elite high schools,” Yancopoulos told Business Insider. “But all it takes is a couple of dedicated teachers with a little support and guidance to run important research programs that can produce winners in this competition and more importantly kids who are going to go on to become scientists and change the world.”
Science has fallen off as one of the top destinations for talents, Yancopoulos said. Through programs like the Science Talent Search, the Society and Regeneron hope to get the nation back on track with science.
“Over last few decades society has gotten confused about who the real heroes are,” Yancopoulos said. “Just like many of you out here I got hooked on reality shows like 'American Idol' and 'So You Think You Can Dance.' But the reality show we should care about the most is the Science Talent Search. Because it’s the reality show that’s helping find the greatest young minds who can change our world for the better.”
SEE ALSO: A 17-year-old just won $150,000 for her ingenious method of cleaning polluted streams
SEE ALSO: The 25 best STEM high schools in the US
Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Bill Nye Reveals The Huge Problem With How We Teach Science
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The inside story of Apple's forgotten project to change how we explore the world from our computers (AAPL)

The inside story of Apple's forgotten project to change how we explore the world from our computers (AAPL) | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
AP Photo/Paul Sakuma
Years before Google and Oculus started daydreaming about virtual reality, Apple already had a “VR” product on the market.
Apple called it QuickTime Virtual Reality, or QuickTime VR.
It's one of the strangest projects in Apple history: Started during the years when Steve Jobs was busy with NeXT, it was ahead of the tech industry by decades but was unloved in its later years, and eventually was wound down.
"When QuickTime VR came out, it wasn't video, it was still images, and they were stitched together to create a 360 view of the world," John Sculley, who was CEO of Apple from 1983 to 1993, told Business Insider. "At the time it seemed pretty amazing."
So while QuickTime VR wasn't exactly like the immersive skydiving videos you can find on YouTube today, it was still innovative, and lessons from its development can inform the current immersive video craze that's being spearheaded by companies like Google, Facebook, and Samsung.
Here’s the story behind Apple's forgotten VR project:
Ahead of its time
AP Photo/Paul SakumaQuickTime VR was designed to do many of the same things as the 360-degree videos now found on Facebook, immersing the viewer in a different physical space — or a look at a specific object — through panoramic images.
At the time, it was magic. Users could look around a virtual world simply by dragging their mouse. Today, there are thousands of YouTube videos that let you do essentially the same thing online.
But in the early 90s, when QuickTimeVR was developed in Apple's Human Interface Group, digital video cameras weren't yet at the point where they are now. There weren't 360-degree cameras like Google's Jump available either.
So the solution was to take a whole bunch of photos with a still camera, and then stitch them together to make a QuickTime panorama. Apple's QuickTimeVR was a image file format that let computers display and explore these panoramas.
"The first way I did panoramic photography was a little bit of a cheat. So what you do is, you take a million pictures and you animate between them," Dan O'Sullivan, one of the early QuickTime VR engineers and a professor at NYU, told Business Insider. "I did all this with a single camera, because imagining the matrix of cameras we now use was just too expensive."
But even when the photos were taken, it took quite a lot of computer power to stitch them together into a panorama — the kind of thing even our phones can do today.
"It was extremely onerous, the stitching and all of that. It was quite a lot of work," O'Sullivan said. Apple even had to buy a Cray supercomputer to do a lot of the processing.
Here's what the software looked like when it launched in 1995:
Youtube Embed:
http://www.youtube.com/embed/6XEDlgtLmAs
Width: 854px
Height: 480px
Years of development
QuickTime VR was actually a project in Apple's labs for years before it was officially released to the public as a stand-alone product in 1995.
In fact, in its earliest days as a research project in Apple's Human Interface Lab in 1991, it started as researchers who just wanted to play with cutting-edge technology and systems, like Apple's HyperCard. They were trying to create digital objects in 3D.
"I was just some punk intern that [Mike Mills, inventor of QuickTime] brought in, and I had these notions of what I wanted to do. So we're at something of an impasse, and I was just this little freak sitting in the corner scanning a Coca-Cola can," O'Sullivan said.
But the early experiments were wildly successful, which led to top Apple brass devoting more resources to the project, including a Cray supercomputer.
"I remember when Sally Ride — she was on the board of directors at Apple at the time — she couldn't believe it, that she could manipulate a 3D geometry in real time," Sculley said. "That was how all the stuff started."
So the Quicktime VR team, including Eric Chen, who eventually debuted the software in 1995, started to come up with a new way to stitch photographs together, and used it to photograph major landmarks using the new panorama technology. One of the first big immersive images was from the top of the Golden Gate Bridge. Apple received permission from the mayor of San Francisco to let them ascend to the top. That image can still be seen on Sullivan's NYU website today, and it was included as a demo on early QuickTime CDs.
After the Quicktime VR team did a demo at MacWorld, one of the biggest conferences at the time, the team got to go on even wilder trips to take 360-degree images — like Russia and Paris.
AP Photo/Paul Sakuma
"When I demoed it on the stage at Macworld, Apple knew this rich woman who was important at the National Gallery. And then the National Gallery knew somebody who was important in Russia. So anyway, we were off on the plane to Russia," O'Sullivan said.
But the biggest QuickTime VR project would begin after it left Apple's research labs.
OJ Simpson
QuickTime VR first gained national attention when NBC used its technology to map Nicole Simpson's condominium complex during the OJ Simpson trial in 1995.
NBC photographed 26 different locations at Simpson's condo, using QuickTimeVR to stitch them together into 360-degree panoramas. On air, the anchor Jack Ford used those visuals to give viewers a sense of the scene.
Apple worked closely with NBC and even provided a copy of the software before it was released.
"I knew that the story of the discovery of the bodies, the blood trail, the logistics and places at OJ's house were all going to be discussed at length, and through one friend at Apple I heard a whisper of QuickTimeVR that was yet to be," David Bohrman, a technology consultant who was then executive producer of news specials at NBC, told Business Insider.
"We took a series of, maybe there were 10 or 12 locations down that walkway, which is where the blood trail was found and blood spots were found," Bohrman said. The nodes continued to "the back of the condo, where in theory it's proposed that his car or some car whisked [Simpson] away."
"Our reporter Jack Ford was able to bring up the exact geography and orient it and show what they were talking about. He could slightly zoom in, and manipulate it. It was an amazingly effective tool," Bohrman said.
After it made its debut on NBC, QuickTime VR went on to power experiences like "Star Trek: The Next Generation Interactive Technical Manual," a digital book that was distributed on CD.
Poor man's VR
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It's difficult not to read about Apple's experiments with panoramic images and not draw a connection to the recent rise of 360-degree videos on platforms like Facebook and YouTube — or even the immersive aspects of services like Google Maps Street View.
Much of what's called VR these days isn't a full interactive environment, but is instead a descendant of the panoramic images that Apple pioneered.
"The head-mounted VR did exist at that time. So it was a poor man's VR. Calling it VR was controversial and somewhat presumptuous," O'Sullivan continued.
In a way, the composition aspects of immersive panoramas haven't changed a whole lot since the early 1990s — it's just easier to do these days.
"Quicktime VR was like a poor man's VR, and you know it's interesting now, I feel like there are still those two strains within VR. There's kind of the photographic VR, where you just take 360-degree video, and then there's the other kind of VR where it's more interactive," O'Sullivan said.
When Steve Jobs returned to Apple, QuickTime VR was de-emphasized. Apple put out its last QuickTime VR-specific press release in 1997, although Apple continued to use it to provide 360-degree views of new products like iPods as late as 2006. "Quicktime VR all really happened in that Scully window before Steve came back, and I think that Apple does not pay any attention to the stuff that happened during those years," Bohrman said.
Ultimately, it's not that surprising that Apple would take a shot at virtual reality — even in a rudimentary form — years before the public was ready to catch on.
"Even to this day Apple is not the most advanced technology company when it comes to data science like Google and Facebook, but it leads the world in terms of user experience," Sculley said. "We were into experiences and obviously Quicktime and Quicktime VR were great examples of that."
NOW WATCH: Google created a virtual reality paint brush lets you walk through your own artwork
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This incredible new first-person shooter is perfect for newcomers and veterans alike

This incredible new first-person shooter is perfect for newcomers and veterans alike | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Playing video games online with other actual human beings can be messy. It brings to mind the too-often accurate stereotype of angry gamers yelling through their headsets at "noobs." It doesn't have to be this way.
Enter "Overwatch."
It's an incredible, new first-person multiplayer shooter that's designed from top to bottom to buck that image and appeal to everyone. You too!
What is "Overwatch?"
"Overwatch" is a colorful, bright, and silly multiplayer shooter made by Blizzard, the same company behind "World of Warcraft."
It takes place in a futuristic fantasy world in the aftermath of a war that tore the world apart.
An international task force called "Overwatch" restored peace to the world, and now, it looks like another threat is on the rise. The characters you can choose from are either members of "Overwatch" or one of the dastardly villains fighting against them.
Really, the story just acts as a sort of tone-setting backdrop for the actual gameplay — everything centers around fighting against your friends in beautifully detailed arenas that range from the streets of Hollywood to abandoned industrial complexes to ancient Japanese temples.
What makes "Overwatch" so special is that it makes itself accessible to people of all gaming backgrounds, primarily through its incredibly diverse character roster.
Choose your character
The brilliant design of "Overwatch" starts when you're faced with the choice of who to play, because each character appeals to a different type of player.
Maybe your only experience with first-person shooters is casual fun in "Halo" or "Call of Duty." Maybe the last first-person shooter you played was "GoldenEye" on the Nintendo 64 (whoa, pal). Try someone like Soldier: 76, who has an arsenal that's instantly familiar to anyone who's picked up any first-person shooter in the last decade.
If you come to "Overwatch" with a lot time spent in MMOs (like Blizzard's "World of Warcraft"), characters who require a bit more creative strategy like Mei are perfect. Rather than rely on precise aim and quick shooting prowess, Mei slows enemies to a crawl with her freeze gun and can erect giant walls of ice that block enemies from progressing through choke points.
She's a "Defense" character, intended to...defend her teammates. That helps to take the onus off you, potentially freaked out player, from having to respond with lightning-fast reflexes.
Regardless of what types of games you played in the past, "Overwatch" is almost guaranteed to have a character for you. There are 21 in total! That's a lot of options!
And if you really don't know who to pick, "Overwatch" makes it easy to figure out who will best match up with your playstyle and experience level.
Each character has a pre-defined role — either Offensive, Defensive, Tank, or Support — that helps players understand what they should be focusing on during a battle. Tank characters jump into the fray and try to soak up as much damage as possible, and Supports tend to hang back and try to keep their teammates alive by healing them or protecting them with shields.
Within those broader categories, characters are rated on a difficulty level that scales from one to three, ensuring that someone who's brand new to the game won't get completely overwhelmed by character that's unusual, like the speedy ninja character Genji.
Well-worn territory
It's important to note that none of this is particularly innovative, but Blizzard excels at creating the definitive version of any well-worn genre. "World of Warcraft" wasn't the first massive multiplayer online game, but it iterated on previous games and made the best and most user-friendly MMO of its generation. That's why it's been so successful for so long.
In the same way, "Overwatch" isn't really treading new ground — it shares a lot of its DNA with games like "Team Fortress" and "Call of Duty" — but Blizzard took the multiplayer shooter formula and figured out how to crack it wide open and make it accessible to everyone.
So, regardless of whether you've spent countless hours in online multiplayer arenas, or if you're just an avid "Candy Crush" player, you should give "Overwatch" a try. You're guaranteed to find a character that works for you.
Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: New film takes you inside the cut-throat world of professional eSports
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How To Find A First Job That Doesn't Make You "Pay Your Dues"

You didn't rack up college debt so you could get coffee; here's how to find a job that offers more meaningful work.
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The Image That Might Change the Way You Look at the Millennium Falcon

The Image That Might Change the Way You Look at the Millennium Falcon | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
The Image That Might Change the Way You Look at the Millennium Falcon | See more about Millennium Falcon, Han Solo and Falcons.
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The most innovative desserts the inventor of the Cronut has dreamed up

The most innovative desserts the inventor of the Cronut has dreamed up | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
The inventor of the Cronut has an Instagram full of other creations that will make your jaw drop.
Chef Dominique Ansel first created the Cronut, a croissant/doughnut hybrid, on May 10, 2013. Three years after the success, Ansel is still creating delicious treats and posting them online for the world to drool over — from lattes with sweet garnishes to cups made of chocolate chip cookie.
The delectable looking eats can be purchased at his restaurant and his bakery in New York City, or his bakery in Tokyo.
Keep scrolling to see some of his most innovative sweets.Along with the cronut, another signature treat of Ansel's is this cup made of cookie filled with milk dubbed the "cookie shot."
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The treats sometimes have a cute flare to them like this hula girl religieuse. It's a cream puff filled with rum pineapple jam and milk chocolate ganache.
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This cow is also a cream puff.
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BMW has created 100 years worth of incredible machines — here are some of the best

BMW has created 100 years worth of incredible machines — here are some of the best | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
What can be said about BMW that hasn't been said before?
The German luxury carmaker, which celebrated its 100th birthday this year, has for its entire history released a seemingly never-ending stream of breathtaking, record-setting, and smile-inducing machines that have consistently beguiled the automotively inclined.
The essence of BMW boils down to its uncanny ability to produce successful new ideas while remaining faithful to its heritage.
And that heritage, by the way, includes innumerable victories in motorsport — on two wheels and four.
Here is the story of 100 years of BMW, one of the best brands around.
SEE ALSO: This is what it's like to fly a personal seaplane around New York City
The Bavarian Motor Works story begins with aircraft engines. Their IIIa radial engine quickly gained a reputation for being one of the best and most reliable of its time. Orders from the German government flooded in, overwhelming the small factory.
Now about that logo: While it is widely known as the "propeller," the blue and white center was meant to represent the Bavarian flag. It was designed by the brother of Karl Rapp, who founded BMW predecessor company Rapp Motorenwerke.
After the company was barred from building military-aircraft engines following World War I, BMW produced its first motorcycle, the R32, in 1923. It was very innovative.
While they are rarely sold, recent prices for R32s at auction include $163,000 for a 1924 model in 2009 and a $139,000 in 2011 for a 1925 model.
See the rest of the story at Business Insider
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Using Composer With WordPress

What Is Composer?Composer is a dependency manager for PHP which allows you to easily manage any third party libraries within your application. You can specify an exact version you want to use on any of the third party packages. Composer will then look up the tag version of this package and download that version into your application.
When developing with WordPress you are dependent on multiple third party libraries for your website to work, things like the core WordPress code and the specific version you're running. Third party plugins from wordpress.org can change the functionality of your website so you're dependent on these running the latest version. This is the reason why composer can be used to manage the updates of your plugins, themes, and the core WordPress code on your WordPress site.
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When a major upcoming PlayStation 4 game got delayed, its maker got death threats

When a major upcoming PlayStation 4 game got delayed, its maker got death threats | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Video game fans are passionate, no doubt, but sometimes that passion bleeds over into less-than-savory behavior. Take, for instance, the case of game developer Sean Murray — he's the guy in charge of Hello Games, the studio that's making "No Man's Sky."
Never heard of it? It's this gorgeous game right here about space exploration:
It's coming to the PlayStation 4 and PC this August. But that's a new development — the game was originally scheduled to launch on June 21. Its delay was officially announced on Friday evening, but the delay was reported earlier this week by Kotaku; that's an important detail to pay attention to, because there was a period of uncertainty between the Kotaku report and the official announcement of the delay. During those few days, Hello Games and Sony stayed silent on social media regarding the report; they also didn't respond to press requests for a statement.
In that period of uncertainty, Hello Games received a number of death threats from aggrieved fans who wanted answers. Murray tweeted about the experience on Saturday night:


I have received loads of death threats this week, but don't worry, Hello Games now looks like the house from Home Alone #pillowfort — Sean Murray (@NoMansSky) May 28, 2016


Murray is a congenial, shy gentleman. He's nice enough that he's quick to make a joke about the experience of receiving death threats over the delay of a video game. But let's be clear: what Murray's dealing with is far from an okay response to — again — the delay of a video game. Should Hello Games have responded to the rumor earlier? Perhaps.
Murray acknowledged that as well:


Sorry I haven't been able to say anything til now. With retail games, there are legal/external reasons why you can't talk freely about dates — Sean Murray (@NoMansSky) May 28, 2016


But that minor mistake is nowhere near a reasonable justification for threatening someone's life. Murray didn't respond to request for comment, but he did issue another goof on the death threats via Twitter:


Tell me when its safe to remove the marbles and oil from the stairs. It's getting really cumbersome, and I need the toilet — Sean Murray (@NoMansSky) May 28, 2016


Here's hoping that he's made it to the bathroom. "No Man's Sky" launches on the PlayStation 4 and PC on August 9.
Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Here's the real reason Disney stopped making video games
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I might have found the best hot dog in America — and it's not where you'd expect

I might have found the best hot dog in America — and it's not where you'd expect | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Thousands of Americans will be putting chairs in the backyard and firing up the grill for Memorial Day weekend.
Plumes of savory smoke will surely dot the nation — and many will be heading to a warehouse store like Costco to buy barbecue and party supplies in bulk beforehand.
Racks of ribs and five-pound packs of hot dogs will be flying off the shelves in a celebratory bulk-buying frenzy.
Yet so many shopping for dogs to grill themselves will breeze right past perhaps the best hot dogs in the country: Costco's.
I'm no hot-dog connoisseur, but of all I've tried in my life thus far, Costco's is the best yet.
How is the nation's best hot dog from such a bare-bones place as the Costco cafeteria?
First of all, it's a great value. You can order a hot dog and a drink for $1.50 — that's it. And considering how large the hot dog is, it's definitely an outrageous deal.
But a deal alone isn't enough to sway most. The expectations are understandably low for a Costco meal. But on that first bite, it's abundantly clear that this is no run-of-the-mill hot dog.
The dog is unexpectedly flavorful. Gone is the bland, hollow taste of the average hot dog; instead, a delightful smoky taste pervades, similar to a kielbasa sausage but not as fatty or rich. There's a slight charred taste to it that isn't overpowering. It's juicy, and there's a satisfying snap with every bite.
This is not the lifeless frankfurter that one microwaves for 30 seconds before chopping up and throwing in some ill-conceived mac-and-cheese dinner. Nay — this dog has vitality. The condiments aren't needed to mask the soul-crushing saltiness that they normally would, but simply to compliment the already delicious hot dog.
Speaking of condiments: Ketchup, mustard, relish, onions, and sauerkraut — if you're into that — are all at your disposal at Costco's commissary. Such freedom is truly a national treasure worthy of our patronage.
The bun is deceptively simple — what's in a bun, after all? It's seen as the vehicle, not the cargo. Yet the bun is the unsung hero of this hot dog.
It's soft and pliant, and tastes lightly sweet, which compliments the dog itself perfectly. But the real magic happens when the condiments are dumped on the dog with wild abandon — precisely because nothing happens. The bun is immune to shabby sogginess or untimely breakage. It's truly miraculous.
By all means, grill your own hot dogs in the backyard — char them if you must. But if you find yourself heading to Costco to stock up on huge amounts of paper napkins, meat for the grill, etc., do yourself a favor and grab a hot dog on the way out. You'll be surprised.
Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Here are the 8 food items you should only get from Costco
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Why Hard Work Isn’t Enough to Succeed

Why Hard Work Isn’t Enough to Succeed | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
One of the most common messages I received as a child was, “Work hard, and you will be rewarded.” This sentiment was echoed by loved ones, teachers, and mentors. There’s a good chance you, too, heard the same rumor about life being fair and equitable. Don’t get me wrong: Hard work is a critical component…
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5 shows and movies to stream this week: Bloodline season 2, Mistress America, and more

5 shows and movies to stream this week: Bloodline season 2, Mistress America, and more | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
How are you going to get through this week? By following our guide to the finest films and TV shows available now, of course. On the list this week: Bloodline, Mistress America, Hell on Wheels, and more.
The post 5 shows and movies to stream this week: Bloodline season 2, Mistress America, and more appeared first on Digital Trends.
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Inside Manhattan's new IKEA for luxury appliances, where you can test music-playing tubs and $19,000 faucets

Inside Manhattan's new IKEA for luxury appliances, where you can test music-playing tubs and $19,000 faucets | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Pirch just opened its first location in New York City. Take a look.
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Banner Blindness, Viewability, Ad Blockers and Other Ad Optimization Tricks

Banner Blindness, Viewability, Ad Blockers and Other Ad Optimization Tricks | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Publishers under fire Ad optimization is a process involving a number of factors that publishers need to pay careful attention to. One of the key challenges facing the display advertising industry is the dual threat of banner blindness and low viewability. These are distinct, although connected, concerns that are increasingly impacting site monetization strategies. At […]
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Use these tools to find out how good your PC is at handling DirectX12

Use these tools to find out how good your PC is at handling DirectX12 | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
There may not be lots of DirectX12 games out there just yet, but they are coming. By the end of the year there will be a lot of them, so how your PC performs in DX12 environments is important. To find out if it's capable, try running these DX12 benchmarks.
The post Use these tools to find out how good your PC is at handling DirectX12 appeared first on Digital Trends.
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