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Forrester's Information Strategy And Architecture Survey Will Establish Current Management Practices In A Rapidly Changing World | Forrester Blogs

Forrester's Information Strategy And Architecture Survey Will Establish Current Management Practices In A Rapidly Changing World | Forrester Blogs | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it

It's becoming pretty clear that the ability to analyze data is becoming one of the most important technology-based capabilities an enterprise can have. There's a lot of hype around about big data, and it's actually well-founded hype --- if that's not a contradiction (perhaps I should call it well-founded fanfare). In any event, our world is changing as organizations gain the ability to process formerly unheard-of amounts of data with formerly unheard-of speed. New, improved information processing capabilities are significantly changing science, where scientists in labs look for patterns in data rather than dream up hypothoses and run tests to prove them right or wrong. And, in similar ways, it's changing how businesses make decisions. I've been looking for evidence that enterprises are moving on improving their information management capabilities since we started doing our "State of EA" surveys in 2009, and the 2012 data finally shows that developing or expanding information architecture is finally EA's #1 priority (well, OK, it's tied for first place with developing or expanding business architecture).

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How does Enterprise Architecture differ from Strategic planning?

How does Enterprise Architecture differ from Strategic planning? | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Add caption According to Wikipedia: “Strategic planning is an organization's process of defining its strategy, or direction, and making decisions on allocating its resources to pursue this strategy, including its capital and people." ...
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Be My API - How to Implement an API Strategy Everyone will Love

Be My API - How to Implement an API Strategy Everyone will Love | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Building great APIs is about more than just design; it requires detailed, thoughtful execution.
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Abstraction, Politics, and Software Architecture

Abstraction, Politics, and Software Architecture | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Abstraction can be defined as a general concept and/or idea that lack any concrete details. Throughout history this type of thinking has led to an array of new ideas and innovations as well as increased confusion and conspiracy.
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hexagonal.js - A Clean Architecture Single Page Apps JavaScript Library

hexagonal. js is a JavaScript library which allows you to build single page applications easily. hexagonal.js is based on the Hexagonal Architecture and allows you to take advantage of it to create web apps.
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Responding to the EA skills quest | Forrester Blogs

Responding to the EA skills quest | Forrester Blogs | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it

EA organizations are under increasing pressure to contribute tangibly to business results and to differentiate in greater terms than architectural domain skills alone.  At the same time, compressed business cycles compel organizations to respond to events or opportunities at a more rapid pace.  This often means resourcing and organizing into effective teams and projects quickly.  EAs are often involved in multiple projects and teams and expected to have sufficiently broad experience, combined with multiple competencies to contribute to organizations’ responses.  Many EA organizations see this skills tension increasing and often struggle to sufficiently develop or resource teams for the ever growing number and diversity of issues they are involved in.  Increasingly, the contextual application of EA to real organizational issues and new opportunities is overtaking the traditional role of EAs in many businesses.  For many EA teams and their stakeholders, the way in which value is derived from investments in EA is through increased contextualization and enhanced adaptability.

 
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Competition or Cooperation: What’s your Strategy?

Competition or Cooperation: What’s your Strategy? | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it

Porter's 5 Force strategy model is a framework that is based on the thinking of threat for competition, survival and intensity of competitive rivalry. Porter's 5 Force strategy model is a framework that is based on the thinking of threat for competition, survival and intensity of competitive rivalry. It's made significant impact on businesses strategy planning cross-sector in last century, however, the emerging trends such as digitalization and globalization make the businesses & world much more inter-connected and interdependent with each other, is such competitive, defensive view of world still good for customers or society as a whole? Shall we get evolving to more collaborative and customer centric model from profit-centric Five Forces? What are your strategic plans to sustain your enterprise in 21st century at digital era?  

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API Management: A Key Component Of Modern Application Architecture | Forrester Blogs

API Management: A Key Component Of Modern Application Architecture | Forrester Blogs | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it

I’ve previously written about how modern application architectures are shifting toward compositional, service-oriented architectures — “for real” this time. RESTful services using XML or JSON payloads proliferate because they’re easy for developers of omnichannel clients to use on virtually any device they need to support. It doesn’t matter if they’re building native apps in Objective C or hybrid apps with Cordova — if they can get an open web API call, it’s good enough to move forward.

This shift to web APIs and modern applications means that companies have to shift their API management strategy as well. They need to 1) create the web APIs and 2) create a life cycle to manage them. It’s this life-cycle element that’s conceptually distinct from traditional SOA governance solutions. For one thing, the services live on the open bus of the Internet and carrier networks. Another difference is that web APIs are increasingly made availabe to third-party developers. They may be part of a newly formed developer community, or they may support the growing number of digital agencies and mobile specialist firms that your company uses to supplement development projects. Security and access models are different (e.g., OAuth 2), provisioning access to APIs needs to support light-touch approval workflows, sandboxes where developers can test their calls are important, and analytics that detail call volume and how developers are using APIs are must-have capabilities. Above all, a developer portal that provides good documentation, example code, and quick time-to-value are important if you want to attract and keep developers.

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5-Years Journey Of TOGAF In China Is Just A Beginning For EA | Forrester Blogs

5-Years Journey Of TOGAF In China Is Just A Beginning For EA | Forrester Blogs | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it

As businesses get larger, and the need for effective alignment of the business with technology capabilities grows, enterprise architecture becomes an essential competency. But in China, many CIOs are struggling with setting up a high-performance enterprise architecture program to support their business strategies in a disruptive market landscape. This seems equally true for state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and multinational companies (MNCs).

To gain a better understanding of the problem, I had an interesting conversation with Le Yao, general secretary of Center for Informatization and Information Management (CIIM) and director of the CIO program at Peking University. Le Yao is one of the first pioneers introducing The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF) into China to help address the above challenges. I believe that the five-year journey of TOGAF in China is just an early beginning for EA, and companies in the China market need relevant EA insights to help them support their business:

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Five Key Agile Practices to Support Architects

Five Key Agile Practices to Support Architects | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
A process-driven approach to insure architecture needs are incorporated in a disciplined agile development process
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The Evolving Role Of Business Architecture | Forrester Blogs

The Evolving Role Of Business Architecture | Forrester Blogs | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it

Business architecture has become a bit of a watchword for organizations thinking about their future. It’s about all sorts of things – the “what” we do and “why” we do it. It’s about the “who with”, or more importantly “who for.” But it’s also about the “how we do it”, and “how we build engagement” to ensure we “do the right things,” rather than just “doing things right.”

Given that I focus on the methods and techniques that help organizations translate strategy into action (business architecture, process architecture, business engagement, etc.), I want to talk a little about the trends, methods and approaches that we see in the practice of business architecture.

I have to say recent engagements have been a real eye opener … some folks are very advanced in some areas – say capturing strategic intent, but then struggle to translate that into meaningful plans that energize colleagues in the business. Some are talking a good story of target operating models – focused around the experiences they deliver to their customers, but then miss the link to current day project portfolio that’s singularly focused on reducing the employee headcount. And as we saw in our recent BPM Suites Wave, business architecture principles are becoming more important at the process execution layer too.

Many business architects have put business capability maps as the core element of their toolbox, with a few different heat maps to help focus attention. When my colleagues and I review the capability maps and approaches of our clients, we find challenged common thread:  Business architects often struggle to get the levels of engagement they need in the business; to be taken seriously and not be seen as some purveyors of some sort of geeky IT method.

As Brian Hopkins put it – they suffer the common IT problem of “doing it to the business” not “with the business.” Gordon Barnett and I are concerned that as much as 75% of the clients we’ve met had a fear of going to the business to discuss issues – they didn’t see that co-developing capability maps could really help them in engaging their colleagues. They were creating capability maps and present them, often without any real business context. It’s not that business folks don’t see the value in capability maps; it’s that to be relevant, business capability maps have to help solve a problem (that they care about).  The two key takeaways:

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The Outcome Focus Of World Class EA Programs | Forrester Blogs

The Outcome Focus Of World Class EA Programs | Forrester Blogs | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it

I recently had a conversation with a new EA practice leaders in the investment management business unit of a large multi-line insurance company.  They wanted to hear my perspectives on what a world-class EA program should look like.  They knew of all the traditional EA building blocks: standards and roadmaps, architecture domains, methodologies like TOGAF.  They had a long list of things to do, but were uncertain about which to tackle first, and had a nagging feeling that these had little to do with world-class EA programs.  We touched on EA maturity models, but quickly concluded that there isn’t an obvious and compelling business value proposition to simply ‘being mature’. 

The conversation shifted to outcomes – what are the outcomes of a world-class EA program?  IT cost reduction could be an outcome, and has been the raison d’etre of EA for years.  IT solution design quality could be an outcome, and has been the justification for architects for longer than EA has been around.  But these are all IT-centric outcomes.

We all know the world is changing.  Digital capabilities are radically impacting our customers, the competitive landscape, the regulatory context, and the operating models of businesses.  Kyle McNabb summarizes this very well in his blog post.  The mantra today is business agility in the face of all these radical changes.  Because of this, being IT-centric is no longer the hallmark of a world class EA program. 

 
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EA’s Five Key Success Factors

EA’s Five Key Success Factors | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
Typically EA team is responsible for strategy/planning, innovation and governance. It should be able to provide guidance, standards, principles and roadmap to anyone within the enterprise.
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Is EA A Strategy

Is EA A Strategy | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
From Wikipedia: Enterprise architecture (EA) is the process of translating business vision and strategy into effective enterprise change by creating, communicating and improving the key requirements, principles and models that describe the...
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The architectural implications of shared services | Forrester Blogs

The architectural implications of shared services | Forrester Blogs | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it

Shared services is widely employed in many industry sectors and is gaining increasing traction as organizations, particularly those subject to continuing cost pressures look for ways to control costs.  For example, in December 2012 the UK government set out its next generation shared services strategy to enable savings of £400-600m per year.  Shared services take many forms, but regardless of the type of shared service, when properly executed it can deliver a range of benefits.  Benefits can result from economies of scale or scope, the ability to negotiate from a stronger consolidated base and through adoption of streamlined, common business processes.  A shared services model can also enable groups to share knowledge and best practice as well as the services themselves.   However, these benefits must be balanced with the flexibility clients (internal or external) require. 

Shareable services typically include corporate service processes such as HR, procurement and finance and accounting. Sharing of enabling capabilities typically include IT infrastructure, workflow, data repositories as well as domain-specific expertise and resources.  Viewed as business services, they can be defined in terms of outcomes and external dependencies using a combination of deliverables, processes, roles, and skills.  This way EAs can help position the shared services within the organization’s architectural construct in terms of service provision to other functions within the business or to external partners or customers.

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Information Technology | Forrester Blogs

Information Technology | Forrester Blogs | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it
The pace of technology-fueled business innovation is accelerating; and enterprise architects can take a leading role by helping their firms identify opportunities for shrewd investment. In our 2012 Global State of EA On-line survey, we asked again what the most disruptive technologies would be; here’s what we found:
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Is there a need for a next gen EA Framework? | Forrester Blogs

Is there a need for a next gen EA Framework? | Forrester Blogs | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it

There are interesting debates all around the globe about whether there is the need for a next gen EA framework.  James Lapalme recently published an excellent article: Three Schools of Thought on Enterprise Architecture explaining the reasons of such debates.   

In this article James identifies three schools of thoughts for EA, each with their own scope and purpose:

"Enterprise IT architecting" which addresses enterprise-wide IT, and the alignment of IT with business."Enterprise integrating" which addresses the coherency of the enterprise as a system with IT is only one component of the enterprise."Enterprise Ecological Adaptation" which addresses the enterprise in its larger environment

For each of these 3 school of thoughts, James describes not only the scope but also the differences in objectives, principles and assumptions, skills, challenges, insights and limitations. 

The first two approaches are most familiar to EA practitioners. We can roughly associate a generation of EA methodology for each of these schools of thoughts: TOGAF for the "enterprise IT architecting", and the most common Business Architecture methods for "Enterprise Integrating". But there isn’t today a cohesive body of thought for a next gen EA framework to address the "Enterprise Ecological Adaptation". I think this 3rd school of thoughts is useful for enterprises which care more broadly about values and in particular "customers values". The outcomes of the enterprises are not only financial but also more about corporate social responsibilities, for example.

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API Management - A Key Component Of Modern Application Architecture | Forrester Blogs

API Management - A Key Component Of Modern Application Architecture | Forrester Blogs | I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. | Scoop.it

I've previously written about how modern application architectures are shifting toward compositional, service oriented architectures-"for real" this time. RESTful services using XML or JSON payloads proliferate because they are easy for developers of omni-channel clients to use on virtually any device they need to support. It doesn't matter if they are building native apps in Objective C or hybrid apps with Cordova - if they can get an open web API call, it's good enough to move forward.

This shift to web APIs and modern applications means that companies have to shift thier API management strategy as well. They need to 1) Create the web APIs and 2) create a lifecycle to manage them. It's this lifecycle element that's conceptually distinct from traditional SOA governance solutions. For one thing, the services live on the open bus of the internet and carrier networks. Another difference is that web APIs are increasingly made availabe to 3rd party developers. They may be part of a newly formed developer community, or they may support the growing number of digital agencies and mobile specialist firms your company is using to supplement development projects. Security and access models are different (e.g. OAuth 2), provisioning access to APIs needs to support light touch approval workflows, sandboxes where developers can test their calls are important, and analytics that detail call volume and how developers are using APIs are must have capabilities. Above all, a developer portal that provides good documentation, example code, and quick time to value are important if you want to attract and keep developers.

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