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Success & Personal Development

Success & Personal Development | I AM | Scoop.it

Hi Webbers,

Here is this weeks Tips for Change.

Aspects that aid in controlling oneself in Self Control


Self-control is one of the various divisions of self-development. It is the capacity to encourage oneself to do the right things in life and curb our animal desires. However, the root of this self-development lies in a strong will power and disciplining oneself. Self-control produces a kind of confidence in us to the things that we think are difficult to achieve. It creates a drive of perseverance in us that make us accomplish our goals. One’s motivation empowers that person and making it possible to accept challenges that assist us with developing self-control.

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Why Mindfulness Is The Foundation Of Emotional Intelligence

Why Mindfulness Is The Foundation Of Emotional Intelligence | I AM | Scoop.it
A growing body of research shows that meditation is an effective way to boost focus, zap stress, relieve symptoms of anxiety and depression, and reduce inflammation, among other benefits.

Via Rami Kantari
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John Thurlbeck, FCMI FRSA's curator insight, April 30, 2015 4:03 PM

I have always found meditating a helpful experience. When aligned with growing your self-awareness as a person and a leader, then you will see growth in your development!

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6 Steps To Using Envisioning To Attain Your Business Goals - Forbes

6 Steps To Using Envisioning To Attain Your Business Goals - Forbes | I AM | Scoop.it
This will be my last blog entry for 2014, and I’d like to focus on a business skill that is appropriate as we close out our business ventures, successes, and failures in 2014 and look forward to new ones in 2015.
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Golden Milk: The Simple Drink That Could Change Your Life

Golden Milk: The Simple Drink That Could Change Your Life | I AM | Scoop.it
Golden Milk is a wonderful beverage to have in the evening and the benefits are extraordinary. The main ingredient in this…
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Interesting

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How Philosophy Makes You a Better Leader

How Philosophy Makes You a Better Leader | I AM | Scoop.it
An exercise to help you understand your behavior.

Via Ron McIntyre
Tim Thomas's insight:

Neat!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, September 22, 2014 2:47 PM

Excellent POV discussion.  It is time for behavioral sciences to interact with business in day do day activities.  It is not a alien subject!

Hervé Odet's curator insight, September 29, 2014 4:59 AM

Comment la philosophie fait de vous un meilleur leader ?

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CRACK YOUR EGG… » ‘Heartfelt’

CRACK YOUR EGG… » ‘Heartfelt’ | I AM | Scoop.it
Tim Thomas's insight:

Where is your smile. Watch the film. I agree with the writer "a little cheesy to start but worth the wait"

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101 coaching tips for great performance coaching pdf format

A long list of interesting coaching tips and coaching questions to improve your coaching skills

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Great read

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» What is Anger? - World of Psychology

» What is Anger? - World of Psychology | I AM | Scoop.it
Are you angry? What does your anger feel like? Are you in control of it, or do you allow it to control you? Or perhaps, a better question: What is
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Interesting questions.

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flickspire - Life is like Coffee

Do you know people that just seem to be happier in general? Do you say to yourself, "I want to be more like them"? Often, the happiest people in the world don't have the best of everything...they just make the best of everything!
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More coffee please

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flickspire - Gratitude HD - Moving Art

I just watched an inspiring video about gratitude that I just had to share with you today. It really made me think about all of the wonderful things we have to be grateful for.

Lots of folks in the US are celebrating Thanksgiving this week, but this video is for everyone on the planet.

I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

Sit back, turn up your speakers and enjoy!

Don’t forget to share this with your friends, family and colleagues.
Tim Thomas's insight:

I love receiving these videos and feel the need to share them when they arrive. I hope you enjoyed your day.

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Santa Clarita's Abi Caruthers Talks Hypnosis Benefits - KHTS Radio

Santa Clarita's Abi Caruthers Talks Hypnosis Benefits - KHTS Radio | I AM | Scoop.it
KHTS Radio
Santa Clarita's Abi Caruthers Talks Hypnosis Benefits
KHTS Radio
Abi Caruthers Talks Hypnosis Benefits Hypnotherapy.
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Now that is news

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Self improvement advice: Meditation - YouTube

Self improvement advice: Meditation

Via elvis
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Everyone should practice

 

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Reynaldo Baird's curator insight, April 24, 2014 5:45 AM

Let me have a look

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Anticipation is power: life crisis vs. opportunity

Anticipation is power: life crisis vs. opportunity | I AM | Scoop.it
Tony Robbins wraps up his list of the 7 Triggers of Business Crisis. TRIGGER #6: A CHANGE IN EMPLOYEES LIVES Have any of you business owners ever had a top employee or salesman go through a life
Tim Thomas's insight:

Interesting information

 

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3 benefits of visual mapping in meetings - Mind Mapping Software Blog

3 benefits of visual mapping in meetings - Mind Mapping Software Blog | I AM | Scoop.it
In a recent VizThink webinar, David Sibbett, a graphical facilitator and founder of The Grove Consultants International, shared three key powerful benefits that visual mapping provides when used to record and display the ideas discussed in a...

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6 Remarketing Tips For Small Business Owners – Ciked

6 Remarketing Tips For Small Business Owners – Ciked | I AM | Scoop.it
It’s not often someone gets married after a first date, and the same analogy can be made about your website. Top of the funnel prospects aren’t typically going to buy from you immediately.
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10 tips on writing a successful CV | BusinessDay

When it comes to applying for a new job, your CV could be just the ticket to get you that initial foot in the door and secure an interview – but how do you ensure your CV is added to the interview pile rather than thrown straight in the bin?

Putting together a successful CV is easy once you know how. It’s a case of taking all your skills and experience and tailoring them to the job you’re applying for. But what if you don’t meet the right criteria? Well, I’ve put together the following tips to help you get started in creating a successful CV and securing your first (or next) arts job.

Get the basics right

There is no right or wrong way to write a CV but there are some common sections you should cover. These include: personal and contact information; education and qualifications; work history and/or experience; relevant skills to the job in question; own interests, achievements or hobbies; and some references.

Presentation is key

A successful CV is always carefully and clearly presented, and printed on clean, crisp white paper. The layout should always be clean and well structured and CVs should never be crumpled or folded, so use an A4 envelope to post your applications.

Always remember the CV hotspot – the upper middle area of the first page is where the recruiter’s eye will naturally fall, so make sure you include your most important information there.

Stick to no more than two pages of A4

A good CV is clear, concise and makes every point necessary without waffling. You don’t need pages and pages of paper – you just keep things short and sweet. A CV is a reassurance to a potential employer, it’s a chance to tick the right boxes. And if everything is satisfied, there’s a better chance of a job interview. Also, employers receive dozens of CVs all the time so it’s unlikely they’ll read each one cover to cover. Most will make a judgment about a CV within sections, so stick to a maximum of two pages of A4 paper.

Understand the job description

The clues are in the job application, so read the details from start to finish. Take notes and create bullet points, highlighting everything you can satisfy and all the bits you can’t. With the areas where you’re lacking, fill in the blanks by adapting the skills you do have. For example, if the job in question requires someone with sales experience, there’s nothing stopping you from using any retail work you’ve undertaken – even if it was something to help pay the bills through university. It will demonstrate the skills you do have and show how they’re transferable.

Tailor the CV to the role

When you’ve established what the job entails and how you can match each requirement, create a CV specifically for that role. Remember, there is no such thing as a generic CV. Every CV you send to a potential employee should be tailored to that role so don’t be lazy and hope that a general CV will work because it won’t.

Create a unique CV for every job you apply for. You don’t have to re-write the whole thing, just adapt the details so they’re relevant.

Making the most of skills

Under the skills section of your CV don’t forget to mention key skills that can help you to stand out from the crowd. These could include: communication skills; computer skills; team working; problem solving or even speaking a foreign language. Skills can come out of the most unlikely places, so really think about what you’ve done to grow your own skills, even if you take examples from being in a local sports team or joining a voluntary group – it’s all relevant.

Making the most of interests

Under interests, highlight the things that show off skills you’ve gained and employers look for. Describe any examples of positions of responsibility, working in a team or anything that shows you can use your own initiative. For example, if you ran your university’s newspaper or if you started a weekend league football team that became a success.

Include anything that shows how diverse, interested and skilled you are. Don’t include passive interests like watching TV, solitary hobbies that can be perceived as you lacking in people skills. Make yourself sound really interesting.

Making the most of experience

Use assertive and positive language under the work history and experience sections, such as “developed”, “organised” or “achieved”. Try to relate the skills you have learned to the job role you’re applying for. For example: “The work experience involved working in a team,” or “This position involved planning, organisation and leadership as I was responsible for a team of people”.

Really get to grips with the valuable skills and experience you have gained from past work positions, even if it was just working in a restaurant – every little helps.

Including references

References should be from someone who has employed you in the past and can vouch for your skills and experience. If you’ve never worked before you’re OK to use a teacher or tutor as a referee. Try to include two if you can.

Keep your CV updated

It’s crucial to review your CV on a regular basis and add any new skills or experience that’s missing. For example, if you’ve just done some volunteering or worked on a new project, make sure they’re on there – potential employers are always impressed with candidates who go the extra mile to boost their own skills and experience.

Source: The Guardia Professional.

Katy Cowan runs the Creative Boom website voluntarily – she is a trained journalist, writer and PR professional. Follow her and Creative Boom on Twitter @Creative_Boom

  
Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 22, 2014 10:49 PM

When it comes to applying for a new job, your CV could be just the ticket to get you that initial foot in the door and secure an interview – but how do you ensure your CV is added to the interview pile rather than thrown straight in the bin?

Putting together a successful CV is easy once you know how. It’s a case of taking all your skills and experience and tailoring them to the job you’re applying for. But what if you don’t meet the right criteria? Well, I’ve put together the following tips to help you get started in creating a successful CV and securing your first (or next) arts job.

Get the basics right

There is no right or wrong way to write a CV but there are some common sections you should cover. These include: personal and contact information; education and qualifications; work history and/or experience; relevant skills to the job in question; own interests, achievements or hobbies; and some references.

Presentation is key

A successful CV is always carefully and clearly presented, and printed on clean, crisp white paper. The layout should always be clean and well structured and CVs should never be crumpled or folded, so use an A4 envelope to post your applications.

Always remember the CV hotspot – the upper middle area of the first page is where the recruiter’s eye will naturally fall, so make sure you include your most important information there.

Stick to no more than two pages of A4

A good CV is clear, concise and makes every point necessary without waffling. You don’t need pages and pages of paper – you just keep things short and sweet. A CV is a reassurance to a potential employer, it’s a chance to tick the right boxes. And if everything is satisfied, there’s a better chance of a job interview. Also, employers receive dozens of CVs all the time so it’s unlikely they’ll read each one cover to cover. Most will make a judgment about a CV within sections, so stick to a maximum of two pages of A4 paper.

Understand the job description

The clues are in the job application, so read the details from start to finish. Take notes and create bullet points, highlighting everything you can satisfy and all the bits you can’t. With the areas where you’re lacking, fill in the blanks by adapting the skills you do have. For example, if the job in question requires someone with sales experience, there’s nothing stopping you from using any retail work you’ve undertaken – even if it was something to help pay the bills through university. It will demonstrate the skills you do have and show how they’re transferable.

Tailor the CV to the role

When you’ve established what the job entails and how you can match each requirement, create a CV specifically for that role. Remember, there is no such thing as a generic CV. Every CV you send to a potential employee should be tailored to that role so don’t be lazy and hope that a general CV will work because it won’t.

Create a unique CV for every job you apply for. You don’t have to re-write the whole thing, just adapt the details so they’re relevant.

Making the most of skills

Under the skills section of your CV don’t forget to mention key skills that can help you to stand out from the crowd. These could include: communication skills; computer skills; team working; problem solving or even speaking a foreign language. Skills can come out of the most unlikely places, so really think about what you’ve done to grow your own skills, even if you take examples from being in a local sports team or joining a voluntary group – it’s all relevant.

Making the most of interests

Under interests, highlight the things that show off skills you’ve gained and employers look for. Describe any examples of positions of responsibility, working in a team or anything that shows you can use your own initiative. For example, if you ran your university’s newspaper or if you started a weekend league football team that became a success.

Include anything that shows how diverse, interested and skilled you are. Don’t include passive interests like watching TV, solitary hobbies that can be perceived as you lacking in people skills. Make yourself sound really interesting.

Making the most of experience

Use assertive and positive language under the work history and experience sections, such as “developed”, “organised” or “achieved”. Try to relate the skills you have learned to the job role you’re applying for. For example: “The work experience involved working in a team,” or “This position involved planning, organisation and leadership as I was responsible for a team of people”.

Really get to grips with the valuable skills and experience you have gained from past work positions, even if it was just working in a restaurant – every little helps.

Including references

References should be from someone who has employed you in the past and can vouch for your skills and experience. If you’ve never worked before you’re OK to use a teacher or tutor as a referee. Try to include two if you can.

Keep your CV updated

It’s crucial to review your CV on a regular basis and add any new skills or experience that’s missing. For example, if you’ve just done some volunteering or worked on a new project, make sure they’re on there – potential employers are always impressed with candidates who go the extra mile to boost their own skills and experience.

Source: The Guardia Professional.

Katy Cowan runs the Creative Boom website voluntarily – she is a trained journalist, writer and PR professional. Follow her and Creative Boom on Twitter @Creative_Boom

David Greene's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:18 PM

Something that always needs updating and improving.  Good suggestions in this article.

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Hypnosis for sports performance - Hypnotherapy Directory

Hypnosis for sports performance - Hypnotherapy Directory | I AM | Scoop.it
Can hypnosis for sports help you win?
Hypnosis can be applied to many different areas of our life and it is widely recognised as an excellent...
Tim Thomas's insight:

I agree!

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Right quarterly: Coaching - Process of building great leaders

Right Management 1st edition of 2014, we wanted to touch upon an important
part of the process of building great leaders: Coaching.

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Interesting

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» 10 Small Ways to Cultivate Mindful Moments - World of Psychology

» 10 Small Ways to Cultivate Mindful Moments	 - World of Psychology | I AM | Scoop.it
Sometimes, we move about our days as though we are asleep or at the mercy of someone else’s duties and dreams. In her book Head to Heart: Mindfulness Moments f
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Great read

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The “Tipping Point” in Everyday Life (New Video) « Robbins Madanes Coach Training

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This is what I study

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4 Ways to Get Your Business Noticed on Google

Whether you’re an existing bricks and mortar business or an online only store – ensuring that your company’s website is visible to existing and potentially new customers is vital.
Tim Thomas's insight:

Nice

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Tension: How coaches can optimise it

Tension: How coaches can optimise it | I AM | Scoop.it
Tension: Continuing their series on challenging coaching Ian Day and John Blakey take a look at how to turn tension into a positive thing.

 

It can be seen that if coaches hold the belief that tension is negative and should be avoided at all cost, they might be selling their coachees short. On the other hand, if we carefully calibrate tension and responsibly adjust levels of tension to suit the individual and their organisational context, then greater levels of performance are attainable. Can we afford to take the liberty of not exploring this possibility fully when times are tough and everyone is required to 'up their game'?


Via Ariana Amorim
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Good read

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Gloria Inostroza's comment, October 15, 2012 5:47 PM
¡Por supuesto! Por ello los educadores debemos aprender a identificar o diseñar "conflictos fértiles" para que los estudiantes aprendan.