Hurricanes
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The Long Road to Recovery: Environmental Health Impacts of Hurricane Sandy

The Long Road to Recovery: Environmental Health Impacts of Hurricane Sandy | Hurricanes | Scoop.it
Gabby Crapp's insight:

Manuel, John. "The Long Road to Recovery: Environmental Health Impacts of Hurricane Sandy." EHP. Environmental Protection Agency, 12 May 2013. Web. 07 July 2014. 



This article represents all about the environment and ecosystem that has been destroyed by hurricane Sandy. This article is crucial because it shows statistics and the road to recovery for animals, plant life, and even the coastal regions that were affected by the hurricane. 

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Jake Wheeler: How Does Media Coverage Impact Disasters? | Center for Disaster Philanthropy

Gabby Crapp's insight:

Wheeler, Jake. "How Does Media Coverage Impact Disasters?" Center for Disaster Philanthropy. Center for Disaster Philanthropy, 18 Oct. 2013. Web. 07 July 2014.


This is often very overlooked and which is why I would be very interested in writing about this in my paper. The media has a huge affect in publicizing these natural disasters and how citizens react to these devastating events. This article not only shows the in's and out's of social media and additionally the "CNN" effect on natural disasters.  

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Hurricanes | Natural Disasters | US EPA

Hurricanes | Natural Disasters | US EPA | Hurricanes | Scoop.it
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"Hurricanes | Natural Disasters | US EPA." EPA. Environmental Protection Agency, n.d. Web. 06 July 2014. 



This article is all about recovering from a hurricane. The government and EPA puts out information regarding how to take steps in preventing maximum damage to families. This article states what to do and what not to do after a hurricane. 

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People in the Outer Banks Should Seriously Consider Evacuating Today

People in the Outer Banks Should Seriously Consider Evacuating Today | Hurricanes | Scoop.it
With less than 36 hours remaining before Tropical Storm Arthur makes its closest approach to North Carolina Thursday night, I’m not going to waste any time: If you’re in the North Carolina Outer Banks, you should seriously consider evacuating today. Here’s why. A hurricane watch and tropical storm warning are...
Gabby Crapp's insight:

Hothaus, Eric. "People in the Outer Banks Should Seriously Consider Evacuating Today." Slate Magazine. Future Tense, 2 July 2014. Web. 6 July 2014.



I find this article fascinating how publicized evacuating hurricanes really is. There are news article everywhere on what to do and how to evacuate and I found them very interesting. 

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Climate Change

Climate Change | Hurricanes | Scoop.it
Introduction




Superstorm Sandy flooded parts of Manhattan and much of coastal New Jersey last October, including taxicabs parked in Hoboken. Scientists say climate change is magnifying the effects of storms like Sandy, droughts in Texas and the Southwest and other extreme weather events worldwide. (Getty Images/Michael Bocchieri)



The effects of climate change are steadily becoming more evident across the globe. Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide — the main heat-trapping greenhouse gas produced by human activities — are the highest in 3 million years, and climbing. Scientists say climate change is increasing the frequency and severity of extreme weather events such as hurricanes, heat waves and droughts. President Obama has called for cutting emissions of greenhouse gases from power plants and other sources and pledged to use regulations if Congress fails to act. Americans increasingly agree that climate change is real and human actions are contributing to it, but many conservative legislators oppose measures designed to address the problem, such as taxing carbon-based fuels. Some experts want to start researching large-scale geoengineering technologies for cooling Earth's climate, but many observers fear that these strategies could do more harm than good.
Gabby Crapp's insight:

Weeks, Jennifer. "Climate Change." CQ Researcher. CQ Press, 12 June 2013. Web. 25 June 2014.


This article is by far my most important article. This article reflects the import ants of the worlds global emissions and limiting our GHG's which are the cause of our climate change. This immense warming climate is the cause for warmer hurricanes and more intense weather around the world. This article shows us the present, present, and future about our involvement in curbing global climate change. Global climate change is a factor that everyone can contribute too, with hurricanes being a such a danger this article shows us how the US and the world as a whole is making progress to slow our production of GHG's. 

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How do hurricanes form? :: NASA's The Space Place

How do hurricanes form? :: NASA's The Space Place | Hurricanes | Scoop.it
Gabby Crapp's insight:

"How Do Hurricanes Form?" NASA's The Space Place. NASA, 08 May 2012. Web. 06 July 2014.



This is the basic information on hurricane formation. This will be my basic introduction to hurricanes and how I will introduce them. The foundation of how hurricanes form is crucial I believe to explain where the destruction of hurricanes truly comes from. 

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PsychiatryOnline | Psychiatric Services | Use of Mental Health Services After Hurricane Floyd in North Carolina

PsychiatryOnline | Psychiatric Services | Use of Mental Health Services After Hurricane Floyd in North Carolina | Hurricanes | Scoop.it
Gabby Crapp's insight:

Fried, Bruce J., Marissa E. Domino, and John Shadle. "Use of Mental Health Services After Hurricane Floyd in North Carolina." Psychiatric Services56.11 (2005): n. pag. EBSCO Host. Web. 6 July 2014. 



This article I found very eye opening! This article explains the mental aspect of experiencing a hurricane and not just the physical damage to the population. Everyone always take about the physical damage and the cost of hurricanes however; the emotional damage is never mentioned which is why I am glad I came across this article. It not only talks about a specific individual but the community emotion destruction. 

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Hurricane Katrina: Facts, Damage & Aftermath

Hurricane Katrina: Facts, Damage & Aftermath | Hurricanes | Scoop.it
Thousands died and millions were left homeless in the most destructive storm to hit the United States.
Gabby Crapp's insight:

Zimmermann, Kim Ann. "Hurricane Katrina: Facts, Damage & Aftermath."LiveScience. TechMedia Network, 20 Aug. 2012. Web. 05 July 2014. 


I find this article very surprising and will be much use during my paper. This article gives me direct evidence and a variety of information from America's most traumatizing hurricane. 

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groupe4tpeadm's curator insight, November 14, 2015 2:01 PM

Cet article relate les faits et les conséquences de Katrina. Il est très utile pour faire un résumé des évènements.

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UNDER WATER: EBSCOhost

Gabby Crapp's insight:

Sheppard, Kate. "Mother Jones." Under Water 38.4 (2013): 8+. July-Aug. 2013. Web. 6 July 2014.   



This article contains more information regarding statistics on earth and environmental government spending after a natural disaster. This article also includes how the government wasn't very prepared for these natural disasters as they can't keep up with the constant reoccurring natural disasters. 

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Coastal Development

Coastal Development | Hurricanes | Scoop.it
Introduction




Scientists expect high-density oceanside communities such as Atlantic Beach, N.Y. — shown nearly a year before Superstorm Sandy heavily damaged the town last October — to be increasingly threatened by intense storms and rising sea levels due to climate change. Environmentalists and taxpayer groups want the government to stop encouraging coastal development. (Getty Images/Bruce Bennett)



Superstorm Sandy, which devastated portions of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut last October, has revived longstanding debates about coastal development. Congress has approved more than $60 billion in relief funding for Sandy, which ranks as one of the most destructive storms in U.S. history. Future storms could be even worse because of climate change, which is raising global sea levels. New York officials are considering building floodgates to protect against storm surges, one of many strategies under consideration. Some experts argue that to make coastlines better able to withstand extreme weather, storm-damaged houses in vulnerable zones should not be rebuilt. Meanwhile, critics blame the federal flood insurance program, designed to help homeowners who cannot get private coverage, for subsidizing risky development with taxpayer dollars. But advocates say the program is needed to protect homeowners against catastrophic loss.
Gabby Crapp's insight:

this article is about costal development and how much damage homeowners can real go through after hurricane damage. This article is primarily about hurricane damage and how much developmental damage they take to repair. 

 

 

Weeks, Jennifer. "Coastal Development." CQ Researcher by CQ Press. CQ Press, 22 May 2013. Web. 25 June 2014. 

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