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Rescooped by Amanda Duvall from Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it?
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Arizona: Game and fish looks to public for help catching poachers

Arizona: Game and fish looks to public for help catching poachers | Hunting | Scoop.it
KINGMAN, Ariz. - In light of recent poaching activity, Arizona Game and Fish Department is offering the public advice in helping to catch those committing an illegal act.

 

There are important "shoulds" and "should nots" in trying to assist in apprehending criminals that can help lead officers to suspects involved in poaching wildlife. In the Kingman area alone, officers are investigating the suspected poaching of two mule deer and an elk.

 

There are times when there is a witness to the crime, others when information is overheard in conversation, and occasionally poaching crimes can be discovered on social networking internet sites...


Via Wildlife Margrit
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Rescooped by Amanda Duvall from IDLE NO MORE WISCONSIN
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Minnesota Wolf Hunt Desecrates Ojibwe Creation Symbol

Minnesota Wolf Hunt Desecrates Ojibwe Creation Symbol | Hunting | Scoop.it

STOP THE WOLF HUNTS NOW - Despite lawsuits and public opposition, wolf hunting began in Minnesota on November 3. - Public Service Announcement by Howling For Wolves


Via Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson
Amanda Duvall's insight:

Yeah go ahead and post a gorey picture to make people feel bad. Thats not the way to try to stop wolf hunting and trapping! Seriously. I know ethics and yeah foot holds are not the most humaine for trapping animals, but you have to know that this is going to happen while trapping. Im a trapper myself. Ive seen lots of animals be trapped and maybe one of a 100 looks like this. Its dumb. all of this.

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Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson's curator insight, April 1, 2013 9:33 AM

This is hard for me to post .. but we have to see the reality.

Rescooped by Amanda Duvall from Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People
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Coastal First Nations prepare to enforce B.C. bear-hunting ban

Coastal First Nations prepare to enforce B.C. bear-hunting ban | Hunting | Scoop.it
Agreement to ban trophy bear hunting on north and central cost was issued last year by aboriginal alliance

Via Wildlife Margrit
Amanda Duvall's insight:

Hunters arnt going to have bears to hunt in the future. Shut it down for a little bit. Yeah a few guides who take a person out to shoot a bear for tons of money. We could use a break from all this guide stuff. I understand they need money to support things but hold off for a while so there are still bears to hunt!!!

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Hunting Deer With My Flintlock

Hunting Deer With My Flintlock | Hunting | Scoop.it

There is something sobering about hunting for your food. Meat tastes different, more precious, when you’ve not only watched it die, but killed it yourself. There is no seasoning in the world that can compare with moral ambiguity.

Amanda Duvall's insight:

This is really true. When you hunt and kill your own food and watched it die, some people feel remorse. I feel its out of respect. My first deer was a nice small little spike. I felt something inside me saying that wasent the happiest thing Ive done. But there was a huge part of me that was all respect. I know ethics. I earn respect for what I kill. I hunt for food not joy. Although I really love seeing deer come running into the call with 8 inches of snow on the ground. Madder of fact I went yesterday.

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Rescooped by Amanda Duvall from Environmental Education & Wildlife Conservation
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Larger wolf packs are less successful in hunting elk - Salt Lake Tribune

Larger wolf packs are less successful in hunting elk - Salt Lake Tribune | Hunting | Scoop.it
Larger wolf packs are less successful in hunting elkSalt Lake Tribune495 died naturally, but his body bore bruises consistent with injuries inflicted in an encounter with large game, according to Dan MacNulty, an assistant professor of wildlife...

Via Education 4 Conservation
Amanda Duvall's insight:

Yeah i think wolves are really smart and know what there doing. I think wovles are smarter than an elk by alot but, it would be harder to kill a animal without being seen with a huge group of wolves. Maybe 2 or 3 is going to be more sucssesful. and with no alpha wolf if it dies the pack wont know what there doing that well.

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What's happening to all the moose? - Bangor Daily News

What's happening to all the moose? - Bangor Daily News | Hunting | Scoop.it
What's happening to all the moose? Bangor Daily News In Minnesota, many moose seem to be dying of parasitic worms called liver flukes; in Wyoming, some researchers are pointing to a worm that blocks the moose's carotid arteries; in New Hampshire,...
Amanda Duvall's insight:

Im not really suprised that worms and parasitic bugs supposingly killing these moose..Sadly this seems true. The reasearch to the cure of this i think will take some time and quite many experiments.. some things will eventually be extinct but i dont think we want moose to quite yet. Is there a moose season down there? Maybe if there is a moose season that you guys should shut it down for a bit till we fix this.

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Rescooped by Amanda Duvall from Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People
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Poaching fines get super-sized next year

Poaching fines get super-sized next year | Hunting | Scoop.it
The possible cost of getting caught poaching a trophy-class animal in Kansas will skyrocket in 2013.

 

For instance, get busted with an illegal whitetail deer that flirts with the magical 200 inches of antler and it could cost $20,000. An illegal bull elk that scores 350 inches could run you $45,000.

 

A poached mule deer with 130 inches of antler, which could be a 2-year-old buck, could run $1,800.

 

Read more here: http://www.kansas.com/2012/09/15/2489960/poaching-fines-get-super-sized.html#storylink=cpy ;


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Rescooped by Amanda Duvall from Trophy Hunting: It's Impact on Wildlife and People
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Shooting down trophy hunters

Shooting down trophy hunters | Hunting | Scoop.it

In an effort to prevent trophy bear hunting, 10 First Nations tribes along the North and Central coast of British Columbia have recently joined forces and announced that the hunting of grizzly and black bears is now banned in their territory. The move comes on the heels of years of pushing the government to do just that.

 

Spokesman Chief Doug Neasloss said, “Despite years of effort by the Coastal First Nations to find a resolution to this issue with the province, this senseless and brutal trophy hunt continues. We will now assume the authority to monitor and enforce a closure of this senseless trophy hunt.”...


Via Wildlife Margrit
Amanda Duvall's insight:

Being a hunter myslef its hard to seeing this shut down. We need it tho. Do we want bears to hunt in the future?! I think yes! I think we should shut it down for a bit even though its hard. You just have to understand that if we kill all the bears now there will be no future for them.

 

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Study suggests grizzly bear hunts are threatening their numbers in B.C.

Study suggests grizzly bear hunts are threatening their numbers in B.C. | Hunting | Scoop.it
By Sandra McCulloch, Times Colonist
Trophy hunting is threatening B.C.’s grizzly bear populations scientists from the Raincoast Conservation Foundation, the University of Victoria and Simon Frase...
Amanda Duvall's insight:

 Hunters arnt going to have bears to hunt in the future. Shut it down for a little bit. Yeah a few guides who take a person out to shoot a bear for tons of money. We could use a break from all this guide stuff. I understand they need money to support things but hold off for a while so there are still bears to hunt!!!

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Rescooped by Amanda Duvall from Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it?
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Decoy Deer Helps Catch Poachers in Idaho

Decoy Deer Helps Catch Poachers in Idaho | Hunting | Scoop.it

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Idaho game wardens say five hunters from eastern Oregon are facing charges and potentially stiff fines for hunting deer in southwest Idaho before the season officially got underway.

 

Idaho authorities announced the charges Tuesday — several weeks after setting up a sting operation that included planting a decoy deer.

 

The hunters were cited Sept. 28 in the Succor Creek area in a remote corner of Owhyee County near the Idaho/Oregon border. Wardens say one of the hunters fired six shots at the decoy deer and citations were issued for killing a real deer out of season.

 

Other charges include hunting without valid state licenses or without a valid deer tag. Wardens also seized the deer and two rifles.

The suspects are expected to appear in court on Oct. 28.


Via Wildlife Margrit
Amanda Duvall's insight:

This is good. There are people out there that are unethical.. sadly. I am a hunter myslef and it really is suprising people are so driven for killing something that there shooting a deer so quick and not thinking that they dont notice that its a decoy. These kind of people arnt thinking things through.

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Wildlife Margrit's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:02 PM

Could this work for rhino?

Candy Copeland's curator insight, October 14, 2013 4:39 AM

I see this on Wild Justice alot.  Hunters that like to kill things just can't resist shooting at the deer parked by the side of the road.  AND THEY GET BUSTED !

Jonah Davis's curator insight, January 15, 2014 7:18 PM

Article

1/15/14

 Early Deer Hunting

            This Article took place in southeast Idaho where five people that are hunting to early are facing some fines. They were caught by Boise forest wardens, and the hunters shot at deer decoys and when the other deer had come over to the decoy, they’d shoot that deer depending on the gender and size as well as age. The hunters did all of this before hunting season even opened in southeast Idaho, and they were cited Sept. 28th in the Succor Creek area in a remote corner of Owyhee County near the Idaho/Oregon border. They were also hunting without a license and were expected to be seen in court on Oct. 28th 2013

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Deer Populations Spiral Out of Control as Wolf and Bear Numbers Decline

Deer Populations Spiral Out of Control as Wolf and Bear Numbers Decline | Hunting | Scoop.it
The populations of large herbivores in the Northern Hemisphere drastically exceed historic numbers—and it's having a serious impact on the forests of the region.

Via Alan Yoshioka
Amanda Duvall's insight:

Wolf and bear are the main natural thinning of the deer herds, becides us.. In some places you can kill 2 deer a day, thats pretty rediculous. Here in sitka we get 6 tags a person for one year of hunting. 

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Rescooped by Amanda Duvall from IDLE NO MORE WISCONSIN
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Hunting Deer | The Ways | The Anishinaabe Way #OjibweTreaties #Ojibwe #IdleNoMore

Hunting Deer | The Ways | The Anishinaabe Way #OjibweTreaties #Ojibwe #IdleNoMore | Hunting | Scoop.it

In Hunting Deer

Greg “Biskakone” Johnson is a member of the Lynx Clan and an enrolled member of the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa. His home on the Lac du Flambeau reservation established by the Treaty of 1854 is also known as Waaswaaganing, “the place of the torch.” 

 

Greg lives his life according to the four seasons, as did his ancestors.  He harvests deer, fish, maple sugar, berries, wild rice, and wild plants.  He enjoys trapping and snaring as well as hunting with a gun. Greg is passionate about keeping the traditional ways alive, and he takes every opportunity to teach these ways to others. Whether he is taking a group of students spearing for the first time or showing community members how to make buckskin moccasins, he shares his knowledge in the hope of keeping a vibrant traditional way of life relevant today.  Greg’s favorite students are his two children, Wasanodae and Koen. Greg taught his daughter how to skin a deer when she was four and his son to make moccasins at age five. Together, the kids tracked their first deer before they turned six.

 

Greg follows traditional practices when hunting and uses nearly all parts of the deer for food, clothing, and tools.  Providing deer meat to elders in and for ceremonies is a priority for Greg.  He is often called upon to provide the deer meat or wild rice for community feasts and funerals. Despite their legal standing, hunting rights of tribal members are constantly under scrutiny. Greg feels it is his duty to use his treaty rights so no one can argue that the rights aren’t necessary or relevant today.

 

These rights originated during the treaty era, when a burgeoning population of Americans moving west set their sites on the vast resources of Ojibwe (Chippewa) territory. The Ojibwe ceded millions of acres of land in exchange for cash, goods, and services. But the inherent right to survive via hunting, fishing and gathering on those ceded territories was retained by the tribe in the treaties of 1836 and 1842, commonly known as the “Pine” and “Mineral” treaties respectively.  

In 1848, Wisconsin became a state, and the Ojibwe found themselves subject to a number of state and federal policies. Most notable were state policies that limited their right to hunt, fish and gather. Conservation laws enacted in Wisconsin failed to recognize the treaties and the reserved resource rights of the Ojibwe. When they exercised these rights by hunting or fishing in the ceded territories, Ojibwe people were subject to search, seizure, jail, and fines imposed by the state.

A lawsuit was filed in 1974 requesting that the State of Wisconsin cease enforcing state laws against tribal members who were exercising legal treaty rights, and the Ojibwe eventually regained these rights in 1991. As off-reservation harvests began, a controversial period in Wisconsin history also started. Protesters attempted to intimidate Ojibwe people and stop them from hunting or fishing in the ceded lands. It took the rulings of a federal judge to make exercising their treaty rights safer for Ojibwe people.

Today deer hunting season in the ceded territory lasts for four months and is regulated by the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC). When Greg hunts on the Lac du Flambeau reservation, hunting is regulated by the tribe. The reservation hunt is modeled after the old way of hunting. Traditionally, the first sign of fireflies is when the Lac du Flambeau people began their hunt for deer. It ends when the weather gets very cold.

 

In addition to constantly striving to live a traditional life, Greg works with students at the local public school teaching Waaswaaganing culture and language. His life goal is to preserve and enhance Ojibwe culture to ensure that it is enjoyed for generations to come.


Via Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson
Amanda Duvall's insight:

A guy is teaching traditions to people about hunting animals. For example, he is teaching kids how to make moccasin boots and showing them to follow traditions and harvest animals correctly. He taught his son to make moccasins at age 5.He taught his daughter to skin a deer at age 4.They tracked a deer by age six. He likes to teach people the traditions of hunting an animal. He thinks that tradition is important so he wants to teach it.

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