Humanities AT2
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Rescooped by Jemma Tanner from Humanities
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What is my national identity?

What is my national identity? | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it
What is my national identity?   To begin with, my view on national identity is that it’s a sense of belonging to a certain nation or state. But without a feeling of belonging to Australia, does...

Via Jack Ingram
Jemma Tanner's insight:

Just... wow. Awesome. Really awesome. This guy's awesome.

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Jack Ingram's curator insight, October 30, 2013 11:33 PM

Some awesome guy wrote this awesome thing because he's awesome. Awesome. Some people might think that's being immodest. Some people are wrong.

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WW1 teaching resources

WW1 teaching resources | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it
Resources for the commemoration of the First World War in 2014-2018. This site provides a range of teaching resources, primary sources, digital content and ideas for how teachers might address this significant historical event in the classroom.
Jemma Tanner's insight:

This is a scoop-it page FULL of World War One resources! I thought that re-scooping this was better than just choosing one resource because they're all relevant and useful. I find this resource very valuable as it includes everything from professional development resources to guides on how to use war memorials for primary students. One resource that definitely stood out to me was the Historical Thinking page (http://historicalthinking.ca/concept/historical-significance) as it has been created with 21st Century Learning in mind. I'd probably use the research and reports it has on the website in my Humanities lessons.

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Curriculum Support | Kirsty Murray

Curriculum Support | Kirsty Murray | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it
Jemma Tanner's insight:

I was really interested in the idea of teaching history using historical fiction. Many primary teachers use this technique in their teaching as it offers a broader range of stories to use as examples. When choosing a fictional history book you must look for one of good literature and history. It must also be accurate and authentic otherwise there's no point in using it as a main resource. It also needs to have an engaging and interesting storyline! I think that by doing this you will definitely be able to create a great lesson with multiple and varying activities.

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ABC Splash Early Primary History - splash.abc.net.au

ABC Splash Early Primary History - splash.abc.net.au | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it
History video, audio clips and games for Early Primary - Foundation (the first year of schooling) to Year 3

Via Catherine Smyth
Jemma Tanner's insight:

I love this website! It features short clips and teacher notes for prep to threes on Australian history topics - upper primary can be found on the tab at the top of the webpage. I think that this is a great resource because it covers issues from sustainability to multiculturalism while still keeping it at the level of the students. I'd use it in the classroom just as I'd use My Place; by showing the video/s and creating activities around the themes presented in them.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, October 8, 2013 1:00 AM

Short clips and teacher notes for K-3 Australian history topics as well as content in the NSW HSIE K-6 syllabus.

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Video – 7 Skills students need for their future

Video – 7 Skills students need for their future | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it

Dr. Tony Wagner, co-director of Harvard’s Change Leadership Group has identified what he calls a “global achievement gap,” which is the leap between what even our best schools are teaching, and the must-have skills of the future: * Critical thinking and problem-solving * Collaboration across networks and leading by influence * Agility and adaptability * Initiative and entrepreneurialism * Effective oral and written communication * Accessing and analyzing information * Curiosity and imagination.

 

- See more at: http://communicationweekly.com/2012/10/video-7-skills-students-need-for-their-future/#sthash.OKEIczV6.dpuf


Via Jim Lerman
Jemma Tanner's insight:

To be a good teacher I will always need to be researching and finding new techniques to use in my practices. I think that this resource is great for clarifying what skills we need to be teaching our students in the 21st Century. As the world changes, so must our teaching, and this video describes that. Critical thinking is high on the priority list as well as problem solving, and these can easily be taught within Humanities lessons. Of course, this resource is for my personal use as a teacher to ensure that the way I'm teaching Humanities is interesting as well as successful.

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National Museum of Australia - Home

National Museum of Australia - Home | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it
We keep the stories of Australia's social history, our unique and distinctive land, nation and people through exhibitions, events, education resources, collections and research.
Jemma Tanner's insight:

Out of many of the museum websites, I found that the National Museum of Australia has an overwhelming number of resources. Offered on the site are many collections that can be used in class (such as photographs, for example) as well as ideas on Australia's history and society. There's also an entire section devoted to classroom learning and professional development for teachers. There are so many opportunities for using this resource for both students and teachers in Humanities. A lesson example could be to use some Aboriginal photographs (http://www.nma.gov.au/collections-search/results?QueryTerms=Basedow_TLF&app=tlf) and write a story from the perspective of the person.

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The future of water in Australia

The future of water in Australia | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it

“ Jeremy Fernandez looks at how we extract, move, store and use water in Australia.”


Via Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV), Maree Whiteley, Lilydale High School
Jemma Tanner's insight:

The only grades I would use this video in would be 5 and 6. This is because it uses some higher level language that younger students may not understand (I'd most likely play it more than once so we can pick apart the information together as a class). I like this resource because it gives a quick overview of what we as a country consider to be an important use of water. This video could be used as inspiration for an inquiry task, or it could be used to begin lessons about our own smart water usage - i.e. discussions about how much 13 gigalitres is and how it was used by industry and households alone in 2010/11.

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The Global Search For Education: Got Tech? - United States

The Global Search For Education: Got Tech? - United States | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it

C.M. Rubin interviews Michael Horn, co-author of Disrupting Class.

 

Introduction:

 

"The benefits of blended online and brick and mortar learning, such as individualization, universal access and equity, and productivity, sound powerfully tempting to policy makers looking for solutions to the failings of standardized education. Further, generations Y and Z have embraced online technology and show motivation to use it to learn. What then are the challenges in realizing the authors’ prediction that 50% of high school courses will be delivered online by 2019? Online learning is expected to improve with time but will it improve enough to offer students and parents value added that is greater than that provided by the traditional classroom? Does increased use of technology work for everyone? What about the socio-emotional aspect of learning? I caught up with Michael Horn, author, co-founder of the Clayton Christensen Institute, and executive director of its education program, to discuss his latest thinking."


Via Jim Lerman
Jemma Tanner's insight:

The thing I picked up most on from the research presented in this article was the idea of "blended learning". I wasn't surprised that the future of education is online, but I was glad that the results showed that a balance between face-to-face learning and online learning is best for our students' learning. As a teacher of Humanities, I would much prefer a balance of technologies in the classroom because I think both methods of teaching have benefits. I will use this resource to guide me when deciding between face-to-face vs. online learning because it's critical to get right in the classroom.

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Rescooped by Jemma Tanner from A Cultural History of Advertising
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This 1976 Commercial Shows How People Never Used To Feel About Kmart

This 1976 Commercial Shows How People Never Used To Feel About Kmart | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it

In the company's early history about a hundred years ago, a now-familiar brand was called Kresge. That doesn't roll off the tongue very easily, so in the '60s they changed their name to Kmart. ....Witness these vintage ads."


Via k3hamilton
Jemma Tanner's insight:

One skill that is necessary in Humanities is the skill of recognising that things change over time. Even though these are only advertisements, being able to recognise the subtle differences between decades is important, for example fashion and technology. As outlined in the AusVELS curriculum, this skill is important in developing concepts of chronology and the ability to order and sequence. I might use this as a short warm up activity/discussion before diving into an in-depth lesson on chronology.

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gitbew's comment, October 24, 2013 1:59 AM
Pretty simple..
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11 Untranslatable Words From Other Cultures

11 Untranslatable Words From Other Cultures | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it
As Friedrich Nietzsche said, "Words are but symbols for the relations of things to one another and to us; nowhere do they touch upon the absolute truth." Here, illustrated, are 11 words whose concepts cannot be properly explained across cultures.

Via Tom Uytterhoeven
Jemma Tanner's insight:
I really like this article because it gives examples of how language affects society and can be used to show students that there are so many ways of expressing yourself through language that even other cultures have made up words for them. This article could be used as an opening discussion for the beginning of a lesson on culture and language, for example. I think this would be an interesting discussion to have with students because it would get them thinking about how languages were created as well as bring up ideas behind world wide communication.
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Australia's Largest Botanic Garden: Biodiversity and Sustainability in the Public Realm

Australia's Largest Botanic Garden: Biodiversity and Sustainability in the Public Realm | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it

In a former sand quarry, a new botanic garden has been completed, one that allows visitors to follow a metaphorical journey of water through the Australian landscape, from the desert to the coastal fringe.

Via the artistry of landscape architecture, this integrated landscape brings together horticulture, architecture, ecology, and art to create the largest botanic garden devoted to Australian flora. It seeks, through the design of themed experiences, to inspire visitors to see our plants in new ways.

The project's completion comes at a time when Botanic Gardens world-wide are questioning existing research and recreational paradigms to address landscape conservation and a renewed interest in meaningful visitor engagement...


Via Lauren Moss
Jemma Tanner's insight:

The reason I decided to scoop this this article was because it involves learning areas to do with Australia's landscape as well as gives the opportunity for students to practically and rationally design a solution to a problem. For example, you could pose a problem environment to the class in which they have to fix within certain restrictions. This could be lowered for younger levels by choosing one area of focus.

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Pedro Barbosa's comment, September 11, 2013 10:23 AM
Lauren, please contact me on pbarbosa@gmail.com regarding this issue.
Bridgett and Sheila 's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:29 AM

This botanical garden shows the landscape of Australia and how they have managed to bring all the plant life throughout Australia into it whether or not they really grow there. This is a form off art and inventions because they have found a way to bring it all in together and give people a nice tour through a small scale Australia. 

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The Australian Curriculum v5.1 History: Content structure

The Australian Curriculum v5.1 History: Content structure | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it
Jemma Tanner's insight:

Out of all of my resources, this link has to be the most important. As it's the set guideline for all primary school teachers in Australia, it outlines what needs to be achieved in the classroom and in all areas of Humanities. As a teacher my first thoughts when designing a lesson would be to find out what I'm meant to be teaching, firstly. Secondly, I'd need to look for what skills the students require and what they need to be aiming for in this unit. By having this back-up I feel as though I can confidently keep track of what I teach as well has have a vision over the entire year of what to teach in Humanities. The AusVELS website is equally important:
http://ausvels.vcaa.vic.edu.au/The-Humanities-History/Overview/Rationale-and-Aims

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3 Aboriginal Australian Designers (plus Indigenous Fashion Week ...

3 Aboriginal Australian Designers (plus Indigenous Fashion Week ... | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it
Australia announces its first Indigenous Fashion Week which involves up and coming Aboriginal Australian designers including Natalie Cunningham, Caressa Sengstock and Lilla Gagliano.
Jemma Tanner's insight:

I was surprised that it took this long to recognise Aboriginal culture in this form. Even just by using this small example, so many issues could be raised to children in a classroom. This includes current issues as well as the ones that shaped Australia as it is today (white settlers, genocide, etc). I think that using this in a discussion would raise a lot of questions and thoughts as to why it's taken this long for an Indigenous Fashion Week to occur. As a teacher I'd use this to begin conversation but not to base an entire lesson on.

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Rescooped by Jemma Tanner from Primary history
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How Students Learn: History in the Classroom

How Students Learn: History in the Classroom | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it

Decades of educational and cognitive research has found that there are 3 fundamental principles of learning. These 3 principles should underpin the  approach we take in teaching history in the primary classroom:

 

1. Students come to the classroom with preconceptions about how the world works. We need to engage primary students' initial understanding.

2. To develop competence in historical inquiry, students must a) have a deep foundation of factual knowledge; b) understand facts and ideas in the context of a conceptual framework, and c) organise knowledge in ways that facilitate retrieval and application.

3. A metacognitive (reflective) approach helps students learn to take control and monitor their learning

 

This book builds on this research and explores how these principles can be applied in teaching history in the primary classroom.

I highly recommend this book.


Via Catherine Smyth
Jemma Tanner's insight:

As soon as I saw this I knew I'd found my last scoop. These simple three steps will help me greatly when teaching Humanities. Going even further, the book 'How Students Learn' is also very useful as it provides an overview of the best ways to teach history in the classroom. Obviously one of the most important things when teaching is teaching with understanding, and that has been emphasised in all three steps. I think I'd use this frequently in my teaching because by having these steps I would be able to keep focused on the end result (gives me continual guidance). I also know it's from a reliable resource - Catherine Smyth being an experienced primary educator herself.

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Selin Gelinci's curator insight, October 27, 2013 5:46 AM

In my opinion this book can be a helpful as it can help me build my knowledge in the area of history. With knowledge comes power; if i feel confident enough with the subject i will be more comfortable with teaching it to my future students. As a student It would be a beneficial resource as it links to other principles such as the 3 fundamental that are mentioned. Knowing how childern acknowledge and learn the concept of 'history' is quite interesting. 

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turn_back_time_booklet.pdf

Jemma Tanner's insight:

This resource is fantastic for students when exploring the past of the area they live in - although it's a UK publication, the ideas in the document are still completely relevant to Australian education. It outlines the task of investigating about what their community was like in the past, including going around to take photos, looking through archives as well as interviewing older residents of the area. I really think this activity would be worth while if done well especially in areas rich with history.

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drama-settlers-under-sail.pdf


Via Catherine Smyth
Jemma Tanner's insight:

Drama is an excellent way of teaching historical events as it forces the student to become the character in the situation. This resource outlines how the drama process could work in a Humanities lesson on immigration (as it was inspired by the Immigration Museum). It includes focus questions as well as goes through the history of settlement in Australia. I think this is an inspiring resource because it's innovative and engaging for the students. I'd use this drama resource in conjunction with other resources (such as videos, images, texts, etc) when teaching about this topic in my classroom.

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Catherine Smyth's comment, May 9, 2013 11:55 PM
Role-play is a powerful way to help young students develop historical understanding. Barton & Levstik (2005) in their book, "Doing History", suggest that students should have the responsibility for creating the drama based on their own investigation. So, rather than giving students a ready-made script, make sure that they play an active role in the creation of the script. This kind of activity requires historical inquiry where students use evidence to construct a story of the past. This Unit of Work provides a useful scaffold for using drama and role-play to teach history.
Maree Whiteley's curator insight, August 3, 2013 10:34 PM

Year 5 and Year 6 AC History- stories of immigration explored through Drama and role-play. 

Joanne Lee Coleman's curator insight, November 3, 1:24 AM
Seems a great way to assist students to understand life in Australia at this time
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Sovereign Hill Education - home

Sovereign Hill Education - home | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it
Jemma Tanner's insight:

I love Sovereign Hill, I always learnt so much when I went there, and now I know why. Their website has an extensive range of materials and resources to use when teaching about the Gold Rush, including teaching kits that have been written according to AusVELS (very helpful! http://education.sovereignhill.com.au/indexd970.html?id=kits) It even has a section of learning resources for teaching ESL students, which I have not seen on any website until now. I highly value the Sovereign Hill website as if I ever need to teach about the Gold Rush I know that all of the information and activity ideas are already there.

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The Early Australian Prospectors Part 1

This Video takes an informed look at the Gold Rushes and early prospecting in Australia. The Video covers the first Gold Rushes of the 1850's and how other d...
Jemma Tanner's insight:

I'd use this resource when teaching about the Gold Rush - I like the way the video clip shows old footage of the times and how the presenter puts the story into perspective. The Gold Rush is one of my favourite topics and I think that by having someone on a video tell the story the students would be much more interested rather than if they had to listen to me tell the story (the difference interesting visuals can make..) In my limited experience I've found that students love watching videos and so I think that they'd be engaged even if I showed bits and pieces from this episode.

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Love is All You Need full length movie.mp4

www.loveisallyouneedthemovie.com For press/media/investing inquires contact: info@wingspanpictures.com www.wingspanpictures.com "Teen bulling and teen suicid...
Jemma Tanner's insight:

Not only does this short film promote gay rights, it also encompasses main ideas behind equality and the ability to put yourself in another's shoes. I think these ideas are the ones we can promote in the classroom through activities like role play because it's easily brought down to the maturity levels of the students. As this video can be quite confronting, I'm not sure I'd show it to my class but rather use what it represents within my lessons. This is such an important issue to discuss with children as it's a part of our society and always will be.

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Rescooped by Jemma Tanner from English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum
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Interactive Hunger Map

Interactive Hunger Map | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it
From Africa and Asia to Latin America and the Near East, there are 870 million people in the world who do not get enough food to lead a healthy, productive life.

Via Maree Whiteley, Lilydale High School
Jemma Tanner's insight:
I really liked this map because it's easy to read and is interactive. This would work really well on the SmartBoard because it's easily accessible for both the students and teacher. This resource could be adapted into a lesson where the students must choose either a red or burgundy country and complete a research project on why these countries have such high levels of hunger. You could also do group presentations on their findings so the whole class gets an overall view of developing countries. The great thing about this map is that it's very basic and can be used in younger grade levels without adjustment.
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Rescooped by Jemma Tanner from :: The 4th Era ::
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Improving students’ learning with effective learning techniques: Promising directions from cognitive and educational psychology

Improving students’ learning with effective learning techniques: Promising directions from cognitive and educational psychology | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it
2013 metastudy in Psychological Science in the Public Interest on an assessment of ten top learning and study strategies.

Via Jim Lerman
Jemma Tanner's insight:

I scooped this because I thought it was really interesting how much of a difference effective learning techniques can make in the classroom. By having this resource I will now be able to design lessons around what is best for the students and avoiding those that have low success rates. Altough this article is quite short, the content in it will be a very helpful reminder during my teaching career, especially in Humanities.

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Primary teacher resources - Consumer Affairs Victoria

Primary teacher resources - Consumer Affairs Victoria | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it
Resources to help primary teachers with consumer education at Years 5 and 6; teacher notes, student activity sheets linked to VELS economics level 4.
Jemma Tanner's insight:
After listening to the guest speaker, I realised that Consumer Affairs Victoria offers teachers many resources to assist in education areas of economics. As I have little knowledge in this area, I feel that these resources will be supportive to me when designing lessons as well as being beneficial for the students. Economics is such a vital area of Humanities that to have this resource is fantastic when looking for ideas for activities and lessons for the class.
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What Green Technology Could Save the World?

What Green Technology Could Save the World? | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it

f you could snap your fingers and invent something that would cure a pressing global problem, what would it be?

A cheap way to extract salt from seawater so we can drink it? Several countries are already dealing with the impact of rising populations and shrinking lakes and wells. For example, in Amman, Jordan, the pipes go dry on some days due to a lack of water. Droughts in China, Australia and Ukraine have led to crop failures, rising food prices and dwindling grain stocks.


Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
Jemma Tanner's insight:
I really enjoyed reading this article because it made me think of so many ways to implement its ideas in the classroom. My initial thought was that I could use it in higher level classrooms by getting the students to read it themselves and then find out their thoughts on the issues presented. An activity they could do could be to actually invent a green technology that would save the world. I think this'd be such a great task because there would have to be lots of research behind what the world needs to survive - this alone brings with it understanding behind environmental issues as well as recognition of current world problems.
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Rescooped by Jemma Tanner from Australian Curriculum Implementation
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Australian Water Education Resources - Home Page

Australian Water Education Resources - Home Page | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it
Australian Water Education Toolkit Resources: Water for the Future priorities taking action on climate change, securing water supplies, using water wisely, supporting healthy rivers.

Via Dr Peter Carey
Jemma Tanner's insight:

The Australian Government Department of the Environment webpage offers many resources when it comes to anything environmental. It's easy to navigate and has clearly written information. I love the topics tab as everything is there that I could possibly use. As sustainability is apart of the AusVELS curriculum

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45 Catchy Sustainability Campaign Slogans

45 Catchy Sustainability Campaign Slogans | Humanities AT2 | Scoop.it
The topic of sustainability is become more publicized among corporate leaders and the exploration into sustainability processes. 76% of corporations anticipate resource shortages impacting their core business objectives in the next 3 to 5 years.

Via Thomas Faltin
Jemma Tanner's insight:

The main reason for scooping this resource was because of the ideas it gives me! There are so many lessons I could base around this website, even though all it gives is sustainability slogans! One lesson gould be to get the students to come up with their own slogan and design a persuasive poster for a campaign. This type of creative task is beneficial because it gets the students thinking about WHY we're promoting sustainability and WHO we're targetting. Creativity is so important because the flexibilty allows the students to guide their own learning and I think that in Humanities this is essential, especially when there is a lot of content to cover. I think this task would also be engaging and a lot of fun - the classroom would look amazing decorated with all the posters.

OR the aim of the task could be to reduce carbon emissions produced by the school and the posters could be hung up around the school targetting students and teachers.

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