Humanidades digitales
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Humanidades digitales
experiencias, debates, publicaciones sobre humanidades digitales con atención particular a la historia digital
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23 maps and charts on language

23 maps and charts on language | Humanidades digitales | Scoop.it

"Did you know that Swedish has more in common with Hindi than it does with Finnish? Explaining everything within the limits of the world is probably too ambitious a goal for a list like this. But here are 23 maps and charts that can hopefully illuminate small aspects of how we manage to communicate with one another."

 

Tags: language, culture, English, infographic.


Via Seth Dixon
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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:40 PM

Mapping of languages...

Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, March 19, 2015 11:15 AM

This article links with Unit Three through "language and communication". These 23 maps range from the history of languages, which languages connect with which, common languages in certain places, different phrases used in the same country for the same thing, and more. Looking at maps to spatially see language helps when trying to understand how the world communicates. One of the maps that I found interesting was the "New York tweets by language". It shows how diverse that city is, and how people are still preserving their native language in a English prominent country.  

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 2015 9:00 PM

Unit 2:

Shows how many languages are actually closely related. Whether or not they sound the same or are located in similar regions, many share the same origins. For example: many words in Spanish and English are the same due to their similar roots. 

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17th century London visualized

"Six students from De Montfort University have created a stellar 3D representation of 17th century London, as it existed before The Great Fire of 1666. The three-minute video provides a realistic animation of Tudor London, and particularly a section called Pudding Lane where the fire started. As Londonist notes, “Although most of the buildings are conjectural, the students used a realistic street pattern [taken from historical maps] and even included the hanging signs of genuine inns and businesses” mentioned in diaries from the period."


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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:53 AM

London in the 1700's was a chacterised by buildings that were very tighly packed together with obviously little fire code. There buildings are similiar to other communities thrughout Europe and areas in Switzerland. This remake of the past gives the student an animated journey into an  England that once was before the fire. It appears preindustrial revolution and shows how the economy was run by individual businesses and markets, its always interesting to look into the past and see the way the same cities exist today. Most importantly we learn and have the best fire codes possible

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:24 AM

For someone who loves history as much as i do this was a real treat. It honest makes you feel as if you could hop on a plane and travel there right now. Also as someone who has walked the streets of london you can see glimpses of these times within the architechture and the city planning. Great video really makes me nostalgic for a time in which was way before myself.

Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 6:41 AM

2G Contemporary Period