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Human Health
A Journey into health and the human body, psyche,,,
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Semen's Secret Ingredient: Sperms actually carry growth factor to woman's brain where it induces ovulation!

Semen's Secret Ingredient: Sperms actually carry growth factor to woman's brain where it induces ovulation! | Human Health | Scoop.it

Like most female animals, women are spontaneous ovulators, meaning they release eggs on a fairly regular basis regardless of their sexual activity. A few animal species, however, such as camels and rabbits, release viable eggs only in response to sex. These animals are called "induced ovulators." For decades, scientific dogma has held that in induced ovulators, the physical stimulation of sex triggers hormonal responses within the female that lead to the production and release of eggs. In 1985, however, a group of Chinese researchers challenged this idea by suggesting that there might be an ovulation-inducing factor (OIF) in semen itself. According to veterinarian and reproductive biologist Gregg Adams of the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, Canada, the hypothesis ran so counter to common wisdom that "people just ignored it.

 

When Adams and his colleagues finally tested the idea decades later, they were taken aback by their results. In 2005, the team injected the seminal fluid of male llamas—closely related to camels—into the hind legs of female llamas to see if the llamas would ovulate without genital stimulation. To their surprise, he says, injecting seminal fluid into the female llamas' bloodstream had "a very potent ovulatory effect."

 

That sparked a 7-year search for OIF in semen. Now, in a recent study, Adams and his colleagues say they've finally found it. The researchers took samples of llama and bull semen to see if OIF could be found in the semen of both induced ovulating species and spontaneously ovulating species. They spun the samples several times in centrifuges to separate the seminal fluid from the sperm. Sperm make up only about 5% of semen, Adams says. Then, the team used heat, various protein-digesting enzymes, and size filters to try to winnow out the effective molecule. After each treatment, they went through "a very thorough process of elimination," Adams says, injecting the altered seminal fluid into the female llamas' hindquarters to see if the molecule had survived and effectively induced ovulation, or been destroyed. To Adams's surprise, the mystery substance turned out to be a protein that's crucial to the development and survival of sensory neurons: neural growth factor, or NGF. "We were looking for an unknown protein," Adams says, but in fact OIF/NGF is a molecule found throughout the bodies of many species.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Ecopsychology - For People Who Think Social Psychology Is Too Credible

Ecopsychology - For People Who Think Social Psychology Is Too Credible | Human Health | Scoop.it
If only there were a field that examines the spiritual, therapeutic and psychological aspects of human-nature relationships, I'd abandon my graduate studies in Theoretical Phys Ed and embrace this new discipline instead.Luckily, there is.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Shannon Steuart's curator insight, August 9, 2013 1:26 AM

Wow, someone who also understands the intricacies and powerful beauty of nature and psychology. 

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Genetically Engineering Babies a Moral Obligation, Says Ethicist - Slashdot

Hugh Pickens writes "The Telegraph reports that Oxford Professor Julian Savulescu, an expert in practical ethics, says that creating so-called designer babies could be considered a 'moral obligation' as it makes them grow up into 'ethically better...
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The Saturday interview: Harvard biologist Edward Wilson

The Saturday interview: Harvard biologist Edward Wilson | Human Health | Scoop.it

Edward  O Wilson's radical paper on how insect and human societies work had the likes of Richard Dawkins lining up to shoot him down.. Here he defends his long career

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Meme accountability? Swiss algorithm tracks crime, rumours, epidemics to source - Channel NewsAsia

Meme accountability? Swiss algorithm tracks crime, rumours, epidemics to source - Channel NewsAsia | Human Health | Scoop.it
Scientists in Switzerland said on Friday they had devised software that can swiftly trace terror suspects, computer viruses, rumour-mongering and even infectious diseases back to their source.
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Science in three dimensions: The print revolution - 3D printers are opening up new worlds to research

Science in three dimensions: The print revolution - 3D printers are opening up new worlds to research | Human Health | Scoop.it

Research labs use many types of 3D printers to construct everything from fossil replicas to tissues of beating heart cells. Arthur Olson’s team at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California, produces models of molecules; some are shown here partway through the printing process. 

 

Chemists and molecular biologists have long used models to get a feel for molecular structures and make sense of X-ray and crystallography data. Just look at James Watson and Francis Crick, who in 1953 made their seminal discovery of DNA's structure with the help of a rickety construction of balls and sticks.

 

These days, 3D printing is being used to mock up far more complex systems, says Arthur Olson, who founded the molecular graphics lab at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California, 30 years ago. These include molecular environments made up of thousands of interacting proteins, which would be onerous-to-impossible to make any other way. With 3D printers, Olson says, “anybody can make a custom model”. But not everybody does: many researchers lack easy access to a printer, aren't aware of the option or can't afford the printouts (which can cost $100 or more).

 

Yet Olson says that these models can bring important insights. When he printed out one protein for a colleague, they found a curvy 'tunnel' of empty space running right through it. The conduit couldn't be seen clearly on the computer screen, but a puff of air blown into one side of the model emerged from the other. Determining the length of such tunnels can help researchers to work out whether, and how, those channels transport molecules. Doing that on the computer would have required some new code; with a model, a bit of string did the trick.

 

3D printer 'inks' aren't limited to plastic. Biologists have been experimenting with printing human cells — either individually or in multi-cell blobs — that fuse together naturally. These techniques have successfully produced blood vessels and beating heart tissue. The ultimate dream of printing out working organs is still a long way off — if it proves possible at all. But in the short term, researchers see potential for printing out 3D cell structures far more life-like than the typical flat ones that grow in a Petri dish.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Hacking humans: Building a better you

Hacking humans: Building a better you | Human Health | Scoop.it
'Man is something that shall be overcome,' wrote Nietzsche. He may have never envisioned today's efforts to re-engineer the body, but he looks prophetic as pioneers aim to push the envelope of human capability.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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‘Superorganisations’ – Learning from Nature’s Networks

‘Superorganisations’ – Learning from Nature’s Networks | Human Health | Scoop.it

Fritjof Capra, in his book ‘The Hidden Connections’ applies aspects of complexity theory, particularly the analysis of networks, to global capitalism and the state of the world; and eloquently argues the case that social systems such as organisations and networks are not just like living systems – they are living systems. The concept and theory of living systems (technically known as autopoiesis) was introduced in 1972 by Chilean biologists Humberto Maturana and Francisco Varela.

 

This is a complete version of a ‘long-blog’ written by Al Kennedy on behalf of ‘The Nature of Business’ blog and BCI: Biomimicry for Creative Innovation www.businessinspired...


Via Peter Vander Auwera, ddrrnt, Spaceweaver, David Hodgson, pdjmoo, Sakis Koukouvis
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, January 18, 8:57 PM

A look at how to go organic with business models in a tech age...

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 14, 9:01 AM

Learning from Nature’s Networks

pdjmoo's curator insight, December 6, 11:04 PM

YOU ARE INVITED TO FOLLOW MY NEWS AGGREGATES @pdjmoo

 

▶  CLIMATE CHANGE http://www.scoop.it/t/changingplanet

▶  BIODIVERSITY http://www.scoop.it/t/biodiversity-is-life

▶  OUR OCEANS http://www.scoop.it/t/our-oceans-need-us

▶   OUR FOOD http://www.scoop.it/t/agriculture-gmos-pesticides

Rescooped by Che Blue Mallick from Amazing Science
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Entropy can lead to order, paving the route to nanostructures

Entropy can lead to order, paving the route to nanostructures | Human Health | Scoop.it

Researchers trying to herd tiny particles into useful ordered formations have found an unlikely ally: entropy, a tendency generally described as "disorder." Shapes can arrange themselves into crystal structures through entropy alone, new research from the University of Michigan shows.

 

Computer simulations by University of Michigan scientists and engineers show that the property can nudge particles to form organized structures. By analyzing the shapes of the particles beforehand, they can even predict what kinds of structures will form.

 

Physicist and chemical engineering professor Sharon Glotzer proposes that such materials could be designed by working backward from the desired properties to generate a blueprint. That design can then be realized with nanoparticles -- particles a thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair that can combine in ways that would be impossible through ordinary chemistry alone. One of the major challenges is persuading the nanoparticles to create the intended structures, but recent studies by Glotzer's group and others showed that some simple particle shapes do so spontaneously as the particles are crowded together.

 

"We studied 145 different shapes, and that gave us more data than anyone has ever had on these types of potential crystal-formers," Glotzer SAID. "With so much information, we could begin to see just how many structures are possible from particle shape alone, and look for trends."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Easter Island “Heads” Have Bodies - Mental Floss

The Easter Island “Heads” Have Bodies - Mental Floss | Human Health | Scoop.it

The Easter Island “Heads” Have Bodies..Metaphor for the unconscious mind whether it pertain to mind as internal or as aura networks etc....

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Computing in the net of possibilities

Computing in the net of possibilities | Human Health | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) -- Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization in Göttingen have developed an entirely new principle for information processing.
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Rescooped by Che Blue Mallick from Physical and Mental Health - Exercise, Fitness and Activity
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Train like an Olympian

Train like an Olympian | Human Health | Scoop.it

So how can we integrate a bit of Usain Bolt or Sally Pearson into our own workouts to help us achieve some golden moments of our own? Here are three ways to add intensity and attitude, and even some altitude into your workout mix: 

 

http://www.smh.com.au/executive-style/fitness/blogs/boot-camp/train-like-an-olympian-20120815-247vm.html


Via Peter Mellow
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