Human Society and its Environment, K-6
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Human Society and its Environment, K-6
CCES1 Describes events or retells stories that demonstrate their own heritage and heritage of others
Students in Early Stage 1 will learn about:
- changes in their lives, both past and present
The following online resources support teachers and students in addressing the subject matter as part of this Change and Continuity outcome.
I have interpreted the subject matter for this HSIE Change & Continuity outcome and addressed it in four key ways in my digital resources:
- changes in students' own lives, past and present
- changes in the lives of students' family (parents, grandparents) that are relevant to the children themselves
- changes in the lives of others (including Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander children) to which students can relate
- changes to objects or ways of doing things, in the past, that have affected objects or processes engaged in by students in the present
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The End by A.A. Milne

The End by A.A. Milne | Human Society and its Environment, K-6 | Scoop.it

This site features A. A. Milne’s classic poem ‘The End’, which captures the innocence of childhood and growing up. Winch (2010) argues that “poetry is wonderful spoken aloud, read aloud, savouring the language” (p.496) and empowers children of all ages. BOS (2007) similarly concedes that “the main purpose for teaching poetry should be to provide for students’ enjoyment and appreciation of ideas and language” (p.93). The poem could be shared via Interactive Whiteboard, in stanzas or read as a whole. Students bring in a toy, clothing or photo from one of the ages in the poem to share. Marsh (2010) recommends this kind of personalised learning, which ensures teachers’ value of “each student’s unique interests, experiences and abilities” (p.252).

 

Students could also predict their toys, clothing or appearance in the future at age 6. These activities support students’ grammar, including their “[use of] past tense in recounts” (BOS, 2007, p.38) and knowledge of common verbs, nouns and adjectives. Assessment could include students drawing and describing their prediction, integrating writing skills. To incorporate creative arts, students learn the poem and participate in simple readers’ theatre with actions to present to a Stage 1 class. Ewing, Hertzberg & Simons (2004) note that readers’ theatre improves students’ confidence in reading, using their voice for a purpose and helps them to appreciate “that all readers bring past experiences to the meanings they make from texts” (p.83).

 

To support this resource, teachers could also introduce Leonie Norrington’s picture book Look See, Look at Me!, as recommended by the Board of Studies online document (2012, p.30). Learning would shift with this book to explore children’s physical abilities; what they can do now or at age three that they couldn’t previously. When choosing classroom resources, “teachers…require contextual knowledge to effectively deconstruct texts and use them to their best advantage in the classroom” (Cavanagh, 2005, p.299). Indeed, this text, produced by an Aboriginal Australian, avoids stereotypes and inaccurate representations of Aboriginal families with “no shoes…no proper clothes … [and] makeshift houses” (McIntosh, 1984, p.25).

 

References

Board of Studies, NSW. (2007). English K-6 Modules. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW

 

Board of Studies, NSW. (2007). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW

 

Board of Studies, NSW. (2012). Suggested Texts for the English K-10 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW

 

Cavanagh, P. (2005). Silences, secrets and little white lies: reflections on the representation of Aboriginal people in Australian schools. In G. Cant, A. Goodall and J. Inns. (Eds.), Discourses and Silences: Indigenous Peoples, Risks and Resistance. (p. 289-308) Christchurch, NZ: University of Canterbury

 

Ewing, R., Hertzberg, M. & Simons, J. (2004). Beyond the Script: Take Two: drama in the classroom (4th ed.). Sydney: Primary English Teaching Association

 

Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming a teacher: Knowledge, skills and issues. Pearson: Frenchs Forest

 

McIntosh, J. (1984). Taking stock, assessing teaching-learning materials for cultural bias: some guidelines and strategies. Sydney, NSW: Department of Education, North Metropolitan Region

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L. & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing and children’s literature (3rd ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press

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How times change

How times change | Human Society and its Environment, K-6 | Scoop.it

This online resource includes interactive tasks suitable for Smartboards, making “learning … interactive and collaborative” (Walsh, 2010, p.17). It provides a broad range of areas in which change occurs, including family, toys and play, home appliances, transport and school. It is scaffolded for teachers, with syllabus links, activity ideas and suggested books and websites.

 

The resource is accompanied by Stage 1 outcomes and it does include some significant sections of text, therefore requiring adaptation to suit Kindergarten. For example, teachers may focus on the images and read the text aloud or just consider key describing words. However, it could also be an advantage for extending proficient students, as “[learning] experiences need to be challenging” (Dufficy, 2005, p.22). Gilbert & Hoepper (2011) suggest that “teachers need to work collaboratively across grade levels” (p.106) in order to deliver variety and breadth of learning experiences. An interactive resource such as this enables “students to travel vicariously to other times and places” (Marsh, 2010, p.117).

 

According to the Education Development Centre (2012), “inquiry-based learning is founded on students taking the lead” and asking questions to orient their investigations. Students focus on the ‘At School’ section of the digital tool to begin thinking about their own school, past and present. Using the National Library of Australia online database (NLA, 2013), teachers find old and new school photographs to share with students. This could lead to a class ‘scavenger hunt’ conducted around their school to photograph and collect photos or samples of school buildings, uniforms, canteen menus, playgrounds or flora and fauna. This inquiry would expose students to “a variety of methods of data collection and analysis” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.108). Using de Bono’s Six Thinking Hats as a scaffold would encourage students to collect information, examine the positive and negative aspects of school change, articulate their feelings about past and present comparisons and present their ideas creatively in a class scrapbook. As assessment, teachers film students’ oral descriptions of what students at their school used to do or have and what they do or have now. This activity would require that students “[recount] a…shared experience” (BOS, 2007, p.20) and work on their oral presentation skills. We need these “more open forms of classroom communication” (Dufficy, 2005, p.39) to engender confidence in children to share their ideas.

 

References

Board of Studies, NSW. (2007). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW

 

Dufficy, P. (2005) Designing Learning for diverse classrooms. Newtown:PETAA

 

Education Development Center, Inc. (2012). How to: Inquiry. Retrieved from http://www.youthlearn.org/learning/planning/lesson-planning/how-inquiry/how-inquiry

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia

 

Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming a teacher: Knowledge, skills and issues. Pearson: Frenchs Forest

 

Walsh, M. (2010). Multimodal literacy: researching classroom practices: Primary English Teaching Association (e:lit). Chapter 2 – New Literacy Practices

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Harmony Day – For Teachers – Lesson Plan 4 – What Shape is That?

Harmony Day – For Teachers – Lesson Plan 4 – What Shape is That? | Human Society and its Environment, K-6 | Scoop.it

The government Harmony Day website features lesson plans and activity suggestions for teachers. With a global perspective, this lesson plan focuses on traditional and contemporary children’s games around the world and how they have changed. The outcome I envision for this task is creating a class Venn diagram. Students recall characteristics of traditional world games for one side of the graph. On the other side, list qualities of a contemporary game the children enjoy playing now and for the centre, students discuss similarities; characteristics that have not changed. This assessment would address key literacy strategies, including contributions to joint construction of texts (BOS, 2007). This could be organised on the Interactive Whiteboard or on a wall display with some laminated words before adding students’ ideas. Wiggins & McTighe (2001) advocate this ‘backward design’; beginning by identifying the desired result “and then deriv[ing] the curriculum from the evidence of learning…called for by the standard and the teaching needed to equip students to perform” (p.8).

 

With this outcome in mind, a suitable learning activity involves students engaging in traditional world games and those that they enjoy playing now. The site provides instructions for playing some Native American games which students could learn to play together. This would involve students developing their interaction skills in literacy, as they “contribute to class discussions … [and] participate in partner and small group activities” (BOS, 2007, p.22). It could be covered as part of the Games and Sports strand of PDHPE, which includes “[identifying] a variety of games and play equipment” (BOS, 2007, p.28) and participation in common games. Importantly, this site is intended as a support for teacher planning and would require finding instructions for playing other global games. Teachers could also build on this plan by inviting students to find out about games their parents and grandparents played, and discuss how these have changed.

 

References

Board of Studies, NSW. (2007). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW

 

Board of Studies, NSW. (2007). PDHPE K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW

 

Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (2001). What is Backward Design?. In Understanding by Design (1st Ed. p.7-19). Saddle River, NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall

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National Museum of Australia - What is this?

National Museum of Australia - What is this? | Human Society and its Environment, K-6 | Scoop.it

This resource encourages historical enquiry and questioning in students’ exploration of change. There is a focus on technology, fostering discussion of objects students use now that have replaced artifacts including gramophones and typewriters. The resource suits the BOS K-6 Syllabus outcome as it allows students to view and discuss “photographs…that show changes in people and ways of doing things” (BOS, 1998, p.29). However, it also aligns with the History Australian Curriculum, including key exploration of “changes and continuities in students’ own lifetimes and that of their families” (BOS, 2012, p.30). It is therefore practical as a transitional resource in the shift from syllabus to curriculum.

 

Marsh (2010) mentions that “teachers need to think through their priorities and to make … major links between what they present, how and why” (p.101). This resource encourages pre-planning with an introductory video for viewing before implementation. Each of the available videos explores a historical object and is accompanied by lesson plans for teachers’ use. Teachers must be aware of such multimedia resources in which “reading, viewing [and] understanding … [are] a simultaneous, interchangeable [process] (Walsh, 2010, p.28). When discussing the objects, students should be able to “demonstrate [their] basic skills of classroom and group interaction” (BOS, 2007, p.23), a key literacy goal for Early Stage 1. To enhance this digital resource, students’ parents or grandparents could be invited to talk about technology they used to use, including objects on the website. Students jointly construct some questions to ask the guests in a simple interview.

 

Assessment of students’ understanding could involve drawing the object used in the past, the present alternative and designing a new object for future use. To incorporate numeracy skills, their final ‘timelines’ could be labelled by “using and understanding [time] terms” (BOS, 2007, p.112) such as past, today, present and future. This resource and associated discussion could be the foundation of students’ understanding of past, present and future and change across this timeline.

 

References

Board of Studies, NSW. (1998). HSIE K-6 Units of Work. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW

 

Board of Studies, NSW. (2007). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW

 

Board of Studies, NSW. (2007). Mathematics K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW

 

Board of Studies, NSW. (2012). History K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW

 

Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming a teacher: Knowledge, skills and issues. Pearson: Frenchs Forest

 

Walsh, M. (2010). Multimodal literacy: researching classroom practices: Primary English Teaching Association (e:lit). Chapter 2 – New Literacy Practices

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Welcome

Welcome | Human Society and its Environment, K-6 | Scoop.it

Rosemary Sullivan’s picture book Tom Tom, about a young Aboriginal boy in the Northern Territory, follows changes in his daily routine in location, clothing and people. This digital resource features literacy activities to compliment the text. According to Gilbert & Hoepper (2011), “SOSE classrooms need to be rich in texts, and a focus on the repertoire of word and text forms needs to be a constant part of teaching” (p.164). The book represents an appropriate introduction to change, as it focuses on daily changes, before consideration of wider timelines.

 

Teachers must be critical when choosing resources with an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander perspective. Cavanagh (2005) reiterates that “even the best intentioned resources can misrepresent Aboriginal people” (p.299). This text avoids “sweeping generalizations” (GSA, 2012, ‘Authenticity’) and focuses on a particular Aboriginal community, therefore acknowledging that “Australian Aborigines come from many different areas” (Dunn, 2002, p.6). The text considers contemporary Aboriginal communities while also recognising some long lasting traditions, including the importance of family. Significantly, the website offers a ‘Q & A’ section in which the book’s author outlines her inspiration and the real Northern Territory Aboriginal communities echoed in the story. This text represents “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities…as living, dynamic and changing cultures” (GSA, 2012, ‘Participation’) and is highly suitable for an Early Stage 1 audience.

 

Following deconstruction of the book’s simple text, Kindergarten children could develop a class storyboard. Students place illustrations of main events in the correct order and jointly construct simple captions to form a ‘Day in the Life of Tom Tom’ storyboard. Hill (2006) argues that it is “important to encourage [children] to write about their illustrations” (p.181). As assessment, children could create a similar storyboard mapping the changes in their own daily routines, using drawings and some photos at school. To address numeracy, children could attempt to label their storyboards with hour times (e.g. 2 o’clock) and consider durations of activities.

 

References

Cavanagh, P. (2005). Silences, secrets and little white lies: reflections on the representation of Aboriginal people in Australian schools. In G. Cant, A. Goodall and J. Inns. (Eds.), Discourses and Silences: Indigenous Peoples, Risks and Resistance. (p. 289-308) Christchurch, NZ: University of Canterbury

 

Dunn, R. (2002). All Present? Guidelines for Inclusive Language and Pictorial Representation for Staff and Students at James Cook University. James Cook University

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia

 

Government of South Australia. (2012). Selection Criteria. Retrieved from http://www.aboriginaleducation.sa.edu.au/files/links/selection_20criteria.pdf

 

Hill, S. (2006). Developing early literacy: assessment and teaching. Armadale, Vic., Eleanor Curtin Publishing. Chapter 8 – Teaching Reading

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