HSIE- Early Stage 1: Care of natural things in the immediate environment
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Environmental Images | Global Education

Environmental Images | Global Education | HSIE- Early Stage 1: Care of natural things in the immediate environment | Scoop.it

Photographs depicting the impacts of pollution and environmental problems across the world.

Sian Tutt's insight:

This section of the Global Education website has photographs of global issues. The filter option can limit the photographs to those relevant to the topic. Some of the environmental photos demonstrate the effect of pollution in several different countries.

 

According to The Board of Studies (2006), students in ES1 should be exploring "familiar natural and built environments" (p. 16) and how to care for them. Therefore, to make this global perspective relevant for Kindergarten students, I would find images of a local environment for the student and then compare it to a similar one in a foreign country. An example of this would be to compare Sydney's Harbour with the harbour in Papua New Guinea illustrated in the image above. By doing this, students can start to make connections by relating the text to a personal experience, ensuring the production of an “authentic learning experience” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.143). This activity aims to introduce early stage 1 students to their identity as a global citizen, which is vital for them in an increasingly interconnected, globalized world (Hicks, 2003). 

 

With the development of technology, and the social context of the 21st century, to be literate requires an ability to engage with a variety of mediums; from simple written texts, to complex visual, interactive and audio texts. Consequently, using a range of images from this website as well as ones from National Geographic for example, ( http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/11/111123-india-ganges-river-pollution/ ) students would not only gain an understanding of the topic but also gain knowledge about reading images.

 

 References

Board of Studies NSW (2006). Human Society and It’s Environment K-6: Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). Cengage Learning: Australia.

 

Hicks, D. (2003) Thirty Years of Global Education: A reminder of key principles and precedents. Educational Review, 55(3)

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Clean Up Australia Day - Teacher Resources

Clean Up Australia Day - Teacher Resources | HSIE- Early Stage 1: Care of natural things in the immediate environment | Scoop.it

Teacher Resources for Clean Up Australia Day

Sian Tutt's insight:

This website provides teachers with all the resources they need to facilitate a Clean Up Australia Day event for their class. It has downloadable documents and general information about the event and how to organize one. In an early stage one class, I would recommend pairing the students with an older student at the school such as a buddy. This would increase the community involvement as well as helping the younger students with what to do. 

 

Being involved in Clean Up Australia Day is extremely beneficial as students will be participating in service learning activities whereby students attempt to implement "difference-making plan of action" (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p 153). When teaching this syllabus dot point, it is important to recognize that the students will have been learning about features in their local environment and the interactions that they have with their local environments (Board of Studies, 2006). This relationship with place is an essential starting block for this unit, where I would focus on rubbish and pollution in our local environments and these effect the beauty and well being of the flora and fauna in that environment. It would then be appropriate to introduce the idea of cleaning up the environment as a solution and then the participation in the day. 

 

A potential assessment for this group of lessons could be a short speech or news segment where the students: identify why our class participated in clean up Australia Day, and describe how it made them feel to clean up the school. This unit is structured by teaching Studies of Society and Environment through critical social understanding and action as well as personal and social development (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

 

Reference

Board of Studies NSW (2006). Human Society and It’s Environment K-6: Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). Cengage Learning: Australia.

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Recycling & Waste: Drag and Drop Student Activity

Recycling & Waste: Drag and Drop Student Activity | HSIE- Early Stage 1: Care of natural things in the immediate environment | Scoop.it
Sian Tutt's insight:

This web link allows students to play a game where they must sort rubbish into the appropriate bins.  The game involves a simple drag and drop process whereby the items appear at the bottom of the screen and must be placed in the correct container. It is highly appropriate as it has no time limit or pressure with 'lives' which can be stressful and unhelpful to the learning process. The game could be  projected onto an interactive whiteboard for whole class learning or be an individual task. Also, after dragging an object into a bin, further information is given about the object, for example "aluminium cans go in our yellow recycling bins. All aluminium cans are 100% recyclable". Apart from providing further information, these sentences provide the opportunity for students to practise their reading skills. It may be appropriate for the teacher to familiarise students with new vocabulary before beginning the class as well as practising reading strategies such as the predicting and using the images to assist with meaning making (Winch, Johnston, March, Ljungdahl & Holliday, 2010).

Before starting this activity, I would use a constructivist approach, and allow students to answer the question "how do we reduce rubbish?" on their own, then,  in pairs they would share their ideas. I would then ask for some feedback where the students tell the class what ideas their partner came up with. This low pressure activity  supports the learning of any EAL/D learners as well by providing plenty of 'think' time and large opportunities to hear and use language in a non threatening way (Dufficy, 2005). After sharing ideas the class may have thought of recycling as a solution. Before using this game a teacher would need to build on the student’s schemata (McInnerey & McInnerey, 2010) by discussing what recycling is. Next the teacher would discuss  what materials can be recycled and what materials need to be put in a bin. This game would definitely be a consolidation activity not an introduction to recycling. As a teacher, I would  bring in some of the objects like aluminium cans, plastic bottles and newspapers to provide real life examples. 

 

References
Dufficy, P. (2005). Designing learning for diverse classrooms. Newtown, NSW: PETAA.    


McInerey, D. M, & McInerey, V. (2010). Educational Psychology: Constructing Learning. Sydney: Pearson Education Australia. 

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing & children’s literature (4th ed.).  South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

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Aboriginal Education Excursion- Centennial Parklands

Aboriginal Education Excursion- Centennial Parklands | HSIE- Early Stage 1: Care of natural things in the immediate environment | Scoop.it

Join our Education Rangers as they guide students through hands on activities, specifically designed to help nurture a connection to their country.

Sian Tutt's insight:

The Centennial Parklands are a combination of parks that cover a total of about 360 hectares in Sydney's south-east. They offer a range of excursions for schools particularly Aboriginal Education. The excursion I would be interested in for this topic is the "Bushtucker Bash " excursion. This excursion is described as one where students:

        "Learn about native plants and how they are used by the Aboriginal people. Find out how Australian Aboriginals managed and shaped the environment through the earliest forms of sustainable land management." (NSW Government, 2014)

 

This excursion is one that would provide students with a first hand experience as to how Aboriginal people care from the land and will begin to develop an understanding of the deep connection they have with the land. The excursion is an appropriate way to teach this topic as Bushtucker Bash is led and taught by Aboriginal people. Having Aboriginal people teach students "allows a genuine exploration of Aboriginal history, languages, culture and contemporary issues" (NSW Board of Studies, 2008, foreword), free from myths, sensalization and the  distortion of Aboriginal issues (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2003).

 

Furthermore this resource also complies with the NSW Department of Education and Training (2003) criteria for selecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander resources. As it was developed with Aboriginal people, it ensures authenticity, balance, participation and sensitivity (NSW Department of Education and Training).

 

As well as this, this resource develops the values and attitudes that the Board of Studies (2006) aims to develop in students. Learning about Indigenous Australians connection to the land and care of the environment, develops intercultural understanding, an appreciation of the environment, a knowledge of how live more sustainably, in addition to encouraging students to be lifelong learners who are curious to learn about others.

 

 

Reference

Board of Studies NSW (2006). Human Society and It’s Environment K-6: Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

NSW Board of Studies. (2008). Working with Aboriginal communities: A guide to community consultation and protocols. Retrieved from from http://abed.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/working-with-aboriginal-communities.pdf

 

NSW Governement. (2014). Aboriginal Education. Retrieved from http://www.centennialparklands.com.au/education/murrngal_aboriginal_education

 

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2003). Aboriginal Education K–12 resource guide. Retrieved from  http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/assets/pdf/aboriginalresourceguide.pdf

 

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Recycle It Video Song

"Video from the album "Let's Go Green! Kids""

Sian Tutt's insight:

The benefits of music include " aural and visual discrimination, co-ordination of the hand, eye [and] mouth… co-operation and alertness" (Pascoe, as cited in Gibson & Ewing, 2011). All of these skills are of benefit for young children in the primary classroom. Ewing (2013) argues that the impact music has on the academic and social learning of children "cannot be overestimated" (p. 82), and so should be an important component of teaching. Integrating musical learning in the Human Society and It's Environment curriculum is therefore beneficial for students and teachers. It provides engagement and an opportunity to learn through music for students, but also allows teachers to cover more than one syllabus dot point in one sequence of lessons.

 

This video song is a catchy melody about recycling. It speaks of items you can recycle as well as a general message about recycling. It is developmentally appropriate for an early stage 1 class and its repetitious refrain would allow for participation by all students. The teacher could leave this on the Interactive Whiteboard for the class to sing together or dance to together

 

This song could be implemented by teachers who wish to "establish classroom routines that model concern for the classroom and school environment" (Board of Studies, 2006, p.47). Using recycling as topic for ways the students can take care of their local environment is a practical way to address the environmental content in the syllabus as well as being an authentic learning experience (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

 

Reference

Board of Studies NSW (2006). Human Society and It’s Environment K-6: Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

Ewing, R. (2013). Creative Arts in the Lives of Young Children: Play, imagination and learning. Camberwell: ACER Press.

 

Gibson, R., & Ewing, R. (2011). Transforming the Curriculum through the Arts. South Yarra: Palgrave Macmillan.

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