ENES1.3 Experiences in environments
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Through my window

Through my window | ENES1.3 Experiences in environments | Scoop.it
Chris Murr's insight:

As one of the last pieces of bushland remaining in inner Sydney, Wolli Creek provides a fantastic study in differences in environments and the experiences that occur within them. There are a number in the site with information on the plants, animals, and environments within the Wolli Creek bush zone.

 

There are also a number of links to excursion groups within the website that would allow the students a first-hand experience of a short, 2 kilometre walk, (ideal for ES1 students who may not be able to handle longer or more complex walks) which still allows them to be amongst bushland and see native flora and fauna.

 

If an excursion isn’t available, there is an online tour that could be put up on an interactive whiteboard and taken with the students with questions that could be answered about the differences between a built environment and Wolli Creek with assessment being able to be made based on the students’ identification of key differences between them.

The activities in this resource could also be related to the “wants and needs” outcomes as the students could determine if the needs of food, shelter, water, etc. could be satisfied for people who knew the environment well.

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Google Map Maker

Google Map Maker | ENES1.3 Experiences in environments | Scoop.it
Add to and update the map with Google Map Maker, and see your edits in Google Maps. Start mapping the places you know.
Chris Murr's insight:

Google map maker is an extension of the widely-used Google maps program that allows users to take sections of google maps and edit and annotate them as they wish. There are a number of ways in which this functionality can be utilised in conjunction with ENES1.

 

The students could all be assigned different areas of the surrounding suburbs with the satellite view on and annotate what aspects of the environment they utilise for what purposes. For example a road could be annotated with “We drive on the roads to go places”, a house could be annotated as a place to live, a shop as a place to buy things we need. This could also be used to explore the differences between natural and built environments.

 

The students could also use this to give a clearer image of their personal experiences by utilising a picture of their  suburb and annotating it with experiences they have, such as annotating the local playing field where they play sport or the bus stop where they catch the bus to school.

Using the creation of maps as a basis, the students could hand draw a map of the class room and annotate it with what they do in each area, before explaining their map to a partner or group which would tie in with creative arts outcome VAES1.1 and VAES1.4.

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Aboriginal Use

Aboriginal Use | ENES1.3 Experiences in environments | Scoop.it
Chris Murr's insight:

This particular source is not a "plug and play" source in that the students won't be able to utilise it wholly by themselves owing to the formal language of the source, however it depicts the usage and interaction of well-known local environmental landmarks that children in the Inner West of Sydney would have encountered at least once and gives a first-hand account of how they were used.

 

Utilising just one page (Aboriginal usage) as an example an using the pictures and explaining the interaction to the class could allow them to see how an environment they likely interact with currently was used previously both by indigenous Australians and settlers and any similarities and differences with how they interact with the river (ie: people still boat down the river, but they cannot swim in it any more).

 

This particular line of questioning could be used to explore how the treatment of our environment by ourselves and others affects our interactions and experiences with our environment, and indigenous curriculum links can be more easily made by using this source as a base and exploring further any local areas of significance to the indigenous population.

 

This could also be utilised in a reflective literary lesson where a student writes how actions they take in the environment impact on others.

 

 

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WCPS Home

WCPS Home | ENES1.3 Experiences in environments | Scoop.it
Chris Murr's insight:

As one of the last pieces of bushland remaining in inner Sydney, Wolli Creek provides a fantastic study in differences in environments and the experiences that occur within them. There are a number in the site with information on the plants, animals, and environments within the Wolli Creek bush zone.

 

There are also a number of links to excursion groups within the website that would allow the students a first-hand experience of a short, 2 kilometre walk, (ideal for ES1 students who may not be able to handle longer or more complex walks) which still allows them to be amongst bushland and see native flora and fauna.

 

If an excursion isn’t available, there is an online tour that could be put up on an interactive whiteboard and taken with the students with questions that could be answered about the differences between a built environment and Wolli Creek with assessment being able to be made based on the students’ identification of key differences between them.

The activities in this resource could also be related to the “wants and needs” outcomes as the students could determine if the needs of food, shelter, water, etc. could be satisfied for people who knew the environment well.

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Stories from our collection

Stories from our collection | ENES1.3 Experiences in environments | Scoop.it
stories from our collection
Chris Murr's insight:

Immigration Stories is an Australian National Maritime Museum website that tells the stories of immigrants from different waves of migration to Australia, including two of the largest migrant populations in Sydney in the Italians and Vietnamese and a story from one of the bigger recent waves of migration, the Afghanis.  As a government history page, the factual backing is solid and reliable.

 

This source can be used as a basis to examine Australia as part of the global community and as a destination for migrants from around world and how this has impact on the students’ experiences in their immediate environment, such as the food they currently eat, the people in their neighbourhood, and other cultural facets such as festivals and celebrations that they may be exposed to, for example the Chinese New Year celebrations in the city, or the Greek Orthodox Easter bell ringing that occurs in Marrickville or Earlwood.

 

The students gain an understanding that their environment and their experience within it is constantly adapting and evolving due to the people within it. This line of learning also contains very close links to CCES1 and CUES1.

 

As a lesson, students could describe to a partner aspects in one of their environments that has been impacted by immigrants, and could be assessed on how clearly they’re able to describe the effects of various groups on their environment. Activities could also involve exploring why people in a new environment may want to bring aspects of their old environment with them, and if the students moved to a new environment, what would they want to bring from their current one? Would it change their new environment and how?

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