Human rights scenario activity - Module 5 Ssekyewa
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'I was 14 when I was sold'

'I was 14 when I was sold' | Human rights scenario activity - Module 5 Ssekyewa | Scoop.it
Laxmi's story of being kidnapped and trafficked in Nepal is not an isolated case but, as this graphical account shows, things are not always what they seem.

Via Seth Dixon
Ssekyewa Charles's insight:

Where is Human Rights Watch? Human trafficing is a crime to humanity!!

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:14 PM

It is sad to see the many different ways the poverty stricken and uneducated regions of the world are exploited, especially the children. Nepal is so poor that most of the recruiters for the predatory foreign networks are often locals who either take their relatives or abductees sent back to find a replacement. The animation helps add clarity and approachability to a bleak and difficult topic.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 30, 2015 9:33 AM

It's heartbreaking to see the plight children living in other parts of the globe, making me all the more appreciative of my uneventful upbringing in the US. Child labor is a practice that many Americans associate with the 19th century, but it continues to be widespread in many parts of the world, as is the case in Nepal. Educational opportunities are few and far in between for many Nepalese, who's short-term financial struggles rob their children of long-term opportunities for success. Many are kidnapped from their homes, or sold by their families to pay off debt with skyrocketing interest rates. The same also holds true for young female sex workers, who suffer an enormous amount of physical and psychological harm at the hands of their kidnappers and their clients. Economic pitfalls and a lack of access to education helps to perpetuate this cycle of abuse, as people are unaware of their rights in addition to lacking the education to advance economically in their societies. The Nepalese national government and several international rights groups are hard at work to combat these harmful practices, but they are fighting an uphill battle against an illicit institution that has ingrained itself in Nepalese society and culture. Great strides are being made, but much still has to be done for the youth of Nepal.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:22 AM

Teaching about human trafficking and child slavery can be very disconcerting and uncomfortable.  How much of the details regarding these horrific situations is age-appropriate and suitable for the classroom?  The BBC is reporting on events with sensitive stories to both give a human face to the story, while protecting the identity of under-aged victims (to read about the production of this comic, read Drawing the News.)  I encourage you to use your own discretion, but I find this comicbook format an accessible, informative and tasteful way to teach about human trafficking in South Asia to minors.  It is a powerful way to teach about some hard (but important) aspects of globalization and economics. 


As geographer Shaunna Barnhart says concerning this comic, "It moves from trafficking to child labor to pressures for migration for wage labor and the resulting injustices that occur. There's differential access to education, gender inequality, land, jobs, and monetary resources that leads to inter- and intra-country trafficking of the vulnerable. In the search for improved quality of life, individuals become part of a global flow of indentured servitude which serves to exploit their vulnerabilities and exacerbate inequalities and injustice. Nepali children 'paid' in food and cell phones that play Hindi music in 'exchange' for work in textile factories - cell phones that are themselves a nexus of global resource chains and textiles which in turn enter a global market - colliding at the site of child labor which remains largely hidden and ignored by those in the Global North who may benefit from such labor."


Tags: Nepal, labor, industry, economic, poverty, globalization, India.


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Rescooped by Ssekyewa Charles from Natural Products Chemistry Breaking News
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Four New Chloro-Eremophilane Sesquiterpenes from an Antarctic Deep-Sea Derived Fungus, Penicillium sp. PR19N-1

Four New Chloro-Eremophilane Sesquiterpenes from an Antarctic Deep-Sea Derived Fungus, Penicillium sp. PR19N-1 | Human rights scenario activity - Module 5 Ssekyewa | Scoop.it

A new chloro-trinoreremophilane sesquiterpene 1, three new chlorinated eremophilane sesquiterpenes 2–4, together with a known compound, eremofortine C (5), were isolated from an Antarctic deep-sea derived fungus, Penicillium sp. PR19N-1. Structures were established using IR, HRMS, 1D and 2D NMR techniques. In addition, the plausible metabolic network of these isolated products is proposed. Compound 1 showed moderate cytotoxic activity against HL-60 and A549 cancer cell lines.

 

Guangwei Wu † , Aiqun Lin † , Qianqun Gu, Tianjiao Zhu*  and Dehai Li*

Mar. Drugs 2013, 11(4), 1399-1408; doi:10.3390/md11041399

 

 


Via NatProdChem
Ssekyewa Charles's insight:

Wawooo....this demonstrates more the value of nature. Cancer is one of the killer diseases today. This discovery brings hope to many, but they had to go deep into the see for it. We have tree species with very positive results against cancer, but nobody has picked interest in researching their properties!!!

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Create Your Personal Brand: 8 Steps

Create Your Personal Brand: 8 Steps | Human rights scenario activity - Module 5 Ssekyewa | Scoop.it

Via Daniel Watson
Ssekyewa Charles's insight:

It is a challenge, and as is said "A successful enterprise requires a person, an idea and funds".

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, May 30, 2013 2:46 PM
7. Get feedback from people you trust.

The advice and encouragement of others helps keep your "brand development" on target.  Philip Styrlund, CEO of The Summit Group, recommends setting up a "board of directors"--a few trusted colleagues who can assess your ongoing efforts and act as an informal sounding board.

8. Be authentic, even a bit risky.

As long as you don't come off like you're crazy or weird, a little opinion in your online presence is a good thing, according to Meg Guiseppi, author of the book 23 Ways You Sabotage Your Executive Job Search. "Don't assume that being authentic will turn people off," she explains. "Nobody is interested in working with a cookie cutter."

Anthony Burke's curator insight, May 31, 2013 5:00 AM

Great checklist for creating an online personal brand for individuals or for businesses of any size - this is now a must in the digital age and economy

Josie's curator insight, May 31, 2013 9:45 AM

Branding is so much more than it was once thought of!

Rescooped by Ssekyewa Charles from Rights & Liberties
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Ethics breaches in the prosecution of alleged terrorists at Gitmo has delayed trials and caused one legal observer to suspect the Obama administration of paving the way for the prison's closing

Ethics breaches in the prosecution of alleged terrorists at Gitmo has delayed trials and caused one legal observer to suspect the Obama administration of paving the way for the prison's closing | Human rights scenario activity - Module 5 Ssekyewa | Scoop.it

Air Force Col. Morris Davis, who served as chief prosecutor of the military commissions for two years, said, "...there are too many fiascos in too short an order to be the result of random chance. I suspect they are painting the picture to show it's taken too long, and there's no end in sight; it's too fatally flawed to save; it creates too much damage to our standing in the eyes of our allies and enemies alike; and it costs too much money at a time when money is tight to continue trying to spit-shine the Gitmo cow-pile in hopes that someday it will shine up nice and look pretty."


Via dMaculate
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Rescooped by Ssekyewa Charles from Geography Education
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'I was 14 when I was sold'

'I was 14 when I was sold' | Human rights scenario activity - Module 5 Ssekyewa | Scoop.it
Laxmi's story of being kidnapped and trafficked in Nepal is not an isolated case but, as this graphical account shows, things are not always what they seem.

Via Seth Dixon
Ssekyewa Charles's insight:

Where is Human Rights Watch? Human trafficing is a crime to humanity!!

more...
Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:14 PM

It is sad to see the many different ways the poverty stricken and uneducated regions of the world are exploited, especially the children. Nepal is so poor that most of the recruiters for the predatory foreign networks are often locals who either take their relatives or abductees sent back to find a replacement. The animation helps add clarity and approachability to a bleak and difficult topic.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 30, 2015 9:33 AM

It's heartbreaking to see the plight children living in other parts of the globe, making me all the more appreciative of my uneventful upbringing in the US. Child labor is a practice that many Americans associate with the 19th century, but it continues to be widespread in many parts of the world, as is the case in Nepal. Educational opportunities are few and far in between for many Nepalese, who's short-term financial struggles rob their children of long-term opportunities for success. Many are kidnapped from their homes, or sold by their families to pay off debt with skyrocketing interest rates. The same also holds true for young female sex workers, who suffer an enormous amount of physical and psychological harm at the hands of their kidnappers and their clients. Economic pitfalls and a lack of access to education helps to perpetuate this cycle of abuse, as people are unaware of their rights in addition to lacking the education to advance economically in their societies. The Nepalese national government and several international rights groups are hard at work to combat these harmful practices, but they are fighting an uphill battle against an illicit institution that has ingrained itself in Nepalese society and culture. Great strides are being made, but much still has to be done for the youth of Nepal.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:22 AM

Teaching about human trafficking and child slavery can be very disconcerting and uncomfortable.  How much of the details regarding these horrific situations is age-appropriate and suitable for the classroom?  The BBC is reporting on events with sensitive stories to both give a human face to the story, while protecting the identity of under-aged victims (to read about the production of this comic, read Drawing the News.)  I encourage you to use your own discretion, but I find this comicbook format an accessible, informative and tasteful way to teach about human trafficking in South Asia to minors.  It is a powerful way to teach about some hard (but important) aspects of globalization and economics. 


As geographer Shaunna Barnhart says concerning this comic, "It moves from trafficking to child labor to pressures for migration for wage labor and the resulting injustices that occur. There's differential access to education, gender inequality, land, jobs, and monetary resources that leads to inter- and intra-country trafficking of the vulnerable. In the search for improved quality of life, individuals become part of a global flow of indentured servitude which serves to exploit their vulnerabilities and exacerbate inequalities and injustice. Nepali children 'paid' in food and cell phones that play Hindi music in 'exchange' for work in textile factories - cell phones that are themselves a nexus of global resource chains and textiles which in turn enter a global market - colliding at the site of child labor which remains largely hidden and ignored by those in the Global North who may benefit from such labor."


Tags: Nepal, labor, industry, economic, poverty, globalization, India.


Rescooped by Ssekyewa Charles from Biomimicry
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Strange Biology Inspires the Best New Materials

Strange Biology Inspires the Best New Materials | Human rights scenario activity - Module 5 Ssekyewa | Scoop.it

"From the shiny, strong nacre that gives abalone shells an unbreakable, opaline sheen, to the goopy mix of proteins fired by a velvet worm that solidify and snare prey upon impact, nature is packed with inspiration for scientists designing new. Waterproof adhesives and self-cleaning surfaces, mineralized teeth and hairy insect feet, the seemingly impossible-to-replicate awesomeness of spider silk: Here are a few of our favorite bio-inspired materials, and their natural sources."


Via Miguel Prazeres
Ssekyewa Charles's insight:

Indeed nature is amazing and truely powerful. We need to conserve it for the future of our children.

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rdvMedecins's curator insight, April 24, 2013 8:35 AM

Applications étonnantes de la recherche fondamentale