Human Nature and Behavior
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Paying Employees to Lose Weight

Paying Employees to Lose Weight | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it
Financial incentives can help improve health — if they are designed properly.
susangautsch's insight:
FYI: Paying Employees to Lose Weight -- Does it work? (Think: Employee Wellness Programs)
4 out of 5 large employers in the US offer some sort of financial incentive to employees to improve their health. These programs make intuitive sense. But do they work? Employees offered a $550 premium reduction didn’t lose weight. Why? 
1. too far in the future. Diet today, get reward next year? Not! hard to motivate around when a cookie beckons. 
2. delayed incentive broken up into small chunks directly deposited won't overcome the cookie either. 
Incentives need to be designed better! 
1. Encourage weight loss by putting employees in groups in which only those who succeed get rewarded. People hate seeing others collect a prize that could've been theirs -- if they tried a little harder. 
2. Capitalizes on "Incentive" and "Loss Aversion". Give them initial account with $ in it. Add a little each time they meet a goal. Remove a little each time they miss a goal. 
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susangautsch's curator insight, March 4, 5:47 PM
FYI: Paying Employees to Lose Weight -- Does it work? (Think: Employee Wellness Programs)
4 out of 5 large employers in the US offer some sort of financial incentive to employees to improve their health. These programs make intuitive sense. But do they work? Employees offered a $550 premium reduction didn’t lose weight. Why? 
1. too far in the future. Diet today, get reward next year? Not! hard to motivate around when a cookie beckons. 
2. delayed incentive broken up into small chunks directly deposited won't overcome the cookie either. 
Incentives need to be designed better! 
1. Encourage weight loss by putting employees in groups in which only those who succeed get rewarded. People hate seeing others collect a prize that could've been theirs -- if they tried a little harder. 
2. Capitalizes on "Incentive" and "Loss Aversion". Give them initial account with $ in it. Add a little each time they meet a goal. Remove a little each time they miss a goal. 
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To Be Happier, Start Thinking More About Your Death

To Be Happier, Start Thinking More About Your Death | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it

Buddhist monks often contemplate the photos of corpses in various stages of decay. The Buddha himself recommended corpse meditation. “This body, too,” students were taught to say about their own bodies, “such is its nature, such is its future, such its unavoidable fate.”

Paradoxically, this meditation on death is intended as a key to better living. It makes disciples aware of the transitory nature of their own physical lives and stimulates a realignment between momentary desires and existential goals. In other words, it makes one ask: 

 

“Am I making the right use of my scarce and precious life?”

 

Among voluntary activities, we might expect that choices would roughly align with satisfaction. Not so. 

susangautsch's insight:

This week I witnessed a gruesome and needless death of a young woman that made me contemplate (among other things) the incredible value we place on life, yet rarely behave as if the moments that make up our life are that precious. Also all week, I've been listening to David Bowie's most recent album, North Star, and loving it. I commented to my son how brilliant it was -- almost a contemplation on death. I'm sure he thought I was simply projecting my own angst given what I saw. Then hours later came the announcement David Bowie had just passed away after an 18mos battle with cancer. Is this album his parting gift that we all contemplate our own death more? It's been said "The last thing your parents teach you is how to die." At my mother's funeral I was profoundly aware of how much in her last years of cancer she taught me how to live. "Have you ever seen a hearse with a U-haul?" She'd ask with a smile. .. Go live, friends. Go live. 

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Find What You Love and Let It Kill You

Find What You Love and Let It Kill You | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it
"We're all going to die, all of us. What a circus! That alone should make us love each other, but it doesn't. We are terrorized and flattened by trivialities; we are eaten up by nothing."
susangautsch's insight:

Pick your vice, and let it kill ya. 

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Mark Manson - Author. Thinker. Life Enthusiast.

Mark Manson - Author. Thinker. Life Enthusiast. | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it

I am an author, blogger and entrepreneur. I write personal development advice that doesn’t suck. Some people say I’m an idiot. Other people say I saved their life. Read on and decide for yourself.

 

 

susangautsch's insight:

Spot-on irreverent and sometimes beautifully offensive life advice. 

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7 Strange Questions That Help You Find Your Life Purpose

7 Strange Questions That Help You Find Your Life Purpose | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it
Find your life purpose with these seven funny and thought-provoking questions.
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The Future of Work and Workers

The Future of Work and Workers | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it
What worries you most—and/or excites you most—about the future of work and workers? Put another way: What will be the most consequential changes in the world of work and workers, and what anxieties and possibilities will they produce?
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How to Live Wisely

How to Live Wisely | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it
What does it mean to live a productive life? What about a happy life? Five exercises that tackle the tough questions. Try these at home.
susangautsch's insight:

Mostly geared for College freshman, but good questions for anyone to explore...

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How to Make Online Dating Work

How to Make Online Dating Work | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it
Research suggests techniques for making the search for love more effective and less exhausting.

 

Scientists working with Match.com found that the kind of partner people said they wanted often didn’t match up with what they were actually interested in. People filter too much; they’d be better off vetting dates in person. 


When researchers analyzed characteristics of couples who’d met on OkCupid, they discovered that one-third had matching answers on three surprisingly important questions: “Do you like horror movies?” “Have you ever traveled around another country alone?” and “Wouldn’t it be fun to chuck it all and go live on a sailboat?” OkCupid believes that answers to these questions may have some predictive value, presumably because they touch on deep, personal issues that matter to people more than they realize.


But what works well for predicting good first dates doesn’t tell us much about the long-term success of a couple.


Women who flirt for the camera or show cleavage are quite successful. Some of what we learned was pretty weird: Men who look away and don’t smile do better than those who do; women holding animals don’t do well, but men holding animals do. Men did better when shown engaging in an interesting activity.


As research by Barry Schwartz and other psychologists has shown, having more options not only makes it harder to choose something, but also may make us less satisfied with our choices, because we can’t help wonder whether we erred.


Although we are initially attracted to people by their physical appearance and traits we can quickly recognize, the things that make us fall for someone are their deeper, more personal qualities, which come out only during sustained interactions. Psychologists like Robert B. Zajonc have established the “mere exposure effect”: Repeated exposure to a stimulus tends to enhance one’s feelings toward it


in dating contexts, a person’s looks, charisma and professional success may matter less for relationship success than other factors that we each value differently, such as tastes and preferences. In fact, they write, few people initiate romantic relationships based on first impressions. Instead they fall for each other gradually, until an unexpected or perhaps long-awaited spark transforms a friendship or acquaintance into something sexual and serious.


In a way, we are all like that Drake song: The more time you spend with us, the more likely we are to get stuck in your head.


It’s hard to get excited about a new person while doing a résumé exchange over beer and a burger. Don’t sit across from your date at a table, sipping a drink and talking about where you went to school. Do something adventurous, playful or stimulating instead, and see what kind of rapport you have. 


In a world of infinite possibilities, perhaps the best thing new dating technologies can do is to reduce our options to people within reach. In a way they’re a throwback to a past age, when proximity was crucial. 

susangautsch's insight:

Wondering if mentoring would work in a similar fashion...

 

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Three Black Women for Justice

Three Black Women for Justice | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it
If, with the nation watching, three black women at three different levels can’t get justice and healing for this community, you tell me where we’re going to get it in our country.
susangautsch's insight:

Amen, sisters. We're counting on you. 

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The Moral Bucket List - David Brooks NYTimes

The Moral Bucket List - David Brooks NYTimes | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it

It occurred to me that there were two sets of virtues, the résumé virtues and the eulogy virtues. The résumé virtues are the skills you bring to the marketplace. The eulogy virtues are the ones that are talked about at your funeral — whether you were kind, brave, honest or faithful. Were you capable of deep love?


I came to the conclusion that wonderful people are made, not born — that the people I admired had achieved an unfakeable inner virtue, built slowly from specific moral and spiritual accomplishments.

 

THE HUMILITY SHIFT

We live in the culture of the Big Me. But all the people I’ve ever deeply admired are profoundly honest about their own weaknesses. They have identified their core sin, whether it is selfishness, the desperate need for approval, cowardice, hardheartedness or whatever. 


SELF-DEFEAT

External success is achieved through competition with others. But character is built during the confrontation with your own weakness.


THE DEPENDENCY LEAP

This individualist worldview suggests that character is this little iron figure of willpower inside. But people on the road to character understand that no person can achieve self-mastery on his or her own. Individual will, reason and compassion are not strong enough to consistently defeat selfishness, pride and self-deception. We all need redemptive assistance from outside. People on this road see life as a process of commitment making. Character is defined by how deeply rooted you are. Have you developed deep connections that hold you up in times of challenge and push you toward the good? 


ENERGIZING LOVE

Dorothy Day led a disorganized life when she was young: drinking, carousing, a suicide attempt or two, following her desires, unable to find direction. But the birth of her daughter changed her. That kind of love decenters the self. It reminds you that your true riches are in another. Most of all, this love electrifies. It puts you in a state of need and makes it delightful to serve what you love.


THE CALL WITHIN THE CALL

We all go into professions for many reasons: money, status, security. But some people have experiences that turn a career into a calling. These experiences quiet the self. All that matters is living up to the standard of excellence inherent in their craft. 


THE CONSCIENCE LEAP

In most lives there’s a moment when people strip away all the branding and status symbols, all the prestige that goes with having gone to a certain school or been born into a certain family. They leap out beyond the utilitarian logic and crash through the barriers of their fears. There's a kind of second love that comes after a person is older, scarred a bit and enmeshed in responsibilities.


Commencement speakers are always telling young people to follow their passions. Be true to yourself. This is a vision of life that begins with self and ends with self. But people on the road to inner light do not find their vocations by asking, what do I want from life? They ask, what is life asking of me? How can I match my intrinsic talent with one of the world’s deep needs?


Their lives often follow a pattern of defeat, recognition, redemption. They have moments of pain and suffering. But they turn those moments into occasions of radical self-understanding. Suffering introduces you to yourself and reminds you that you are not the person you thought you were.


The people on this road see the moments of suffering as pieces of a larger narrative. They are not really living for happiness, as it is conventionally defined. They see life as a moral drama and feel fulfilled only when they are enmeshed in a struggle on behalf of some ideal.

This is a philosophy for stumblers. The stumbler scuffs through life, a little off balance. But the stumbler faces her imperfect nature with unvarnished honesty, with the opposite of squeamishness. Recognizing her limitations, the stumbler at least has a serious foe to overcome and transcend. The stumbler has an outstretched arm, ready to receive and offer assistance. Her friends are there for deep conversation, comfort and advice.

 

External ambitions are never satisfied because there’s always something more to achieve. But the stumblers occasionally experience moments of joy. There’s joy in freely chosen obedience to organizations, ideas and people. There’s joy in mutual stumbling. There’s an aesthetic joy we feel when we see morally good action, when we run across someone who is quiet and humble and good, when we see that however old we are, there’s lots to do ahead.

The stumbler doesn’t build her life by being better than others, but by being better than she used to be. Unexpectedly, there are transcendent moments of deep tranquillity. For most of their lives their inner and outer ambitions are strong and in balance. But eventually, at moments of rare joy, career ambitions pause, the ego rests, the stumbler looks out at a picnic or dinner or a valley and is overwhelmed by a feeling of limitless gratitude, and an acceptance of the fact that life has treated her much better than she deserves.

Those are the people we want to be.


 




susangautsch's insight:

Lives often follow a pattern of defeat, recognition, redemption.

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Gendered Language in Teaching Evaluations

Gendered Language in Teaching Evaluations | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it

This interactive chart lets you explore the words used to describe male and female teachers in about 14 million reviews from RateMyProfessor.com.

 
susangautsch's insight:

REALITY or PERCEPTION?

Words like "smart", "brilliant", and "genius" are heavy for the males, whereas words like "helpful", "organized" and "nice" are heavy for females. ... 

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Can You Read People's Emotions?

Can You Read People's Emotions? | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it
The “Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test” measures a person’s ability to understand others’ emotional states.
susangautsch's insight:

Great self-assessment of your own Emotional Intelligence  -- which  I confess, I sometimes find too dang touchy feely, but all hard data shows it's the stuff that will make or break someone's professional life, AND top things employers seek in job candidates (effective team work, interpersonal skills, diplomacy, collaborative skills, verbal and presentation skills, etc.) 

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You are where you live

You are where you live | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it
In many ways, geography is consumer destiny. Government data show distinct spending priorities, some rather mysterious, in the 18 metro areas that it tracks — regional personalities of conspicuous (and everyday) consumption.
susangautsch's insight:

From USC Price School:  Analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Expenditure Survey data by Elizabeth Currid-Halkett and Hyojung Lee

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Creativity now is as important in education as literacy and we should treat it with the same status."

Creativity now is as important in education as literacy and we should treat it with the same status." | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it

"Creativity now is as important in education as literacy and we should treat it with the same status." - Sir Ken Robinson


Sketchnote by @sylviaduckworth


Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Creativity


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=creativity



Via Gust MEES
susangautsch's insight:

Just like what Dan Pink has been advocating for 10yrs that an MFA is today's more valuable MBA. Viva la Creative Class. 

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delta14's curator insight, February 3, 10:48 AM

La creatividad es un componente esencial en el proceso de aprendizaje y logro de las competencias exigidas en el siglo XXI. La infografía de Gust MEES presenta 12 beneficios de la creatividad.

Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, March 2, 7:26 PM

Creativity now is as important in education as literacy and we should treat it with the same status." - Sir Ken Robinson


Sketchnote by @sylviaduckworth


Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Creativity


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=creativity


Brenda West Mccullers's curator insight, March 16, 7:21 PM

Creativity now is as important in education as literacy and we should treat it with the same status." - Sir Ken Robinson


Sketchnote by @sylviaduckworth


Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Creativity


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=creativity


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Mere-exposure effect (aka familiarity principle)

Mere-exposure effect

The mere-exposure effect is a psychological phenomenon by which people tend to develop a preference for things merely because they are familiar with them. In social psychology, this effect is sometimes called the familiarity principle. The effect has been demonstrated with many kinds of things, including words, Chinese characters, paintings, pictures of faces, geometric figures, and sounds.

Advertising

The most obvious application of the mere-exposure effect is found in advertising, but research has been mixed as to its effectiveness at enhancing consumer attitudes toward particular companies and products. One study tested the mere-exposure effect with banner ads seen on a computer screen. The study was conducted on college-aged students who were asked to read an article on the computer while banner ads flashed at the top of the screen. The results showed that each group exposed to the "test" banner rated the ad more favorably than other ads shown less frequently or not at all. This research supports the evidence for the mere-exposure effect.[17]

A different study showed that higher levels of media exposure are associated with lower reputations for companies, even when the mere exposure is mostly positive.[18] A subsequent review of the research concluded that exposure leads to ambivalence because it brings about a large number of associations, which tend to be both favorable and unfavorable.[19] Exposure is most likely to be helpful when a company or product is new and unfamiliar to consumers. An 'optimal' level of exposure to an advertisement may or may not exist. In a third study, experimenters primed consumers with affective motives. One group of thirsty consumers were primed with a happy face before being offered a beverage, while a second group was primed with an unpleasant face. The group primed with the happy face bought more beverages, and were also willing to pay more for the beverage than their unhappy counterparts. This study bolsters Zajonc's claim that choices are not in need of cognition. Buyers often choose what they 'like' instead of what they have substantially cognized.[20]

In the advertising world, the mere-exposure effect suggests that consumers need not cognize advertisements: the simple repetition is enough to make a 'memory trace' in the consumer's mind and unconsciously affect their consuming behavior. One scholar explains this relationship as follows: "The approach tendencies created by mere exposure may be preattitudinal in the sense that they do not require the type of deliberate processing that is required to form brand attitude."[21]

Other areas

The mere-exposure effect exists in most areas of human decision making. For example, many stock traders tend to invest in securities of domestic companies merely because they are more familiar with them despite the fact that international markets offer similar or even better alternatives.[22] The mere-exposure effect also distorts the results of journal ranking surveys; those academics who previously published or completed reviews for a particular academic journal rate it dramatically higher than those who did not.[23] There are mixed results on the question of whether mere exposure can promote good relations between different social groups.[24] When groups already have negative attitudes to each other, further exposure can increase hostility.[24] A statistical analysis of voting patterns found that a candidate's exposure has a strong effect on the number of votes they receive, distinct from the popularity of the policies.[24] Another example would be an automotive journalist claiming his own car being the best car in the world despite having driven countless cars.

 
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Consider making short personable videos just to say hi, give friendly reminders, etc. 

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Screencast-O-Matic

Screencast-O-Matic | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it
Free Features:15-minute recordingsScreen & webcam recordingPublish to YouTubeSave as video filePro Features:No watermarkMake longer recordings*Record Computer Audio (Windows Only)*Edit toolsScripted RecordingsDraw and zoomPublish to Google Drive, Vimeo,
DropboxScreenshot Tool
susangautsch's insight:

Nice replacement for Jing -- which never updated or improved. Here you get 15min but more importantly the Edit tools are pretty cool as well as publishing options. 

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TINYPulse - Pulsing Employee Engagement Surveys for Directors

TINYPulse - Pulsing Employee Engagement Surveys for Directors | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it
Directors and senior managers across the globe are using pulsing employee engagement surveys. Learn why they are core tools for retaining and engaging workers.
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Making Friends in New Places

Making Friends in New Places | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it
At the start of freshman year, there’s a window of opportunity when rules about social interactions are suspended and it feels perfectly normal to talk to strangers. Do it.
susangautsch's insight:

graphite and diamonds. 

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4 Approaches to Winning at Work Relationships

4 Approaches to Winning at Work Relationships | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it
Be HAPPY at WORK! How to look mildly intimidating, make the rounds with a telepresence robot, and know your work spouse from your work crush.
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Guess Who Doesn’t Fit In at Work

Guess Who Doesn’t Fit In at Work | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it
Recruiters for top firms often define merit in their own image.

 

Wanting to work with people like ourselves is not new. In the past, employers overtly restricted job opportunities based on sex, race and religion, which is now illegal. But cultural fit has become a new form of discrimination that keeps demographic and cultural diversity down, all in the name of employee enjoyment and fun.


--

ACROSS cultures and industries, managers strongly prize “cultural fit” — the idea that the best employees are like-minded. One recent survey found that more than 80 percent of employers worldwide named cultural fit as a top hiring priority. 

 

When done carefully, selecting new workers this way can make organizations more productive and profitable. But cultural fit has morphed into a far more nebulous and potentially dangerous concept. It has shifted from systematic analysis of who will thrive in a given workplace to snap judgments by managers about who they’d rather hang out with. In the process, fit has become a catchall used to justify hiring people who are similar to decision makers and rejecting people who are not.

 

Although diversity in many industries has increased in recent decades, progress in the corporate realm has been slower than expected. Selection based on personal fit can keep demographic and cultural diversity low.


Class-biased definitions of fit are one reason investment banks, management consulting firms and law firms are dominated by people from the highest socioeconomic backgrounds. Also, whether the industry is finance, high-tech or fashion, a good fit in most American corporations still tends to be stereotypically masculine. Consequently, fit can exclude high-performing candidates — female or male — who are more stereotypically feminine.

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That Pesky Problem of Two Doors

That Pesky Problem of Two Doors | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it

People who work with numbers better understand the logic to these non-numeric questions.


You’re in a dungeon with two doors. One leads to escape, the other to execution. There are only two other people in the room, one of whom always tells the truth, while the other always lies. You don’t know which is which, but they know that the other always lies or tells the truth. You can ask one of them one question, but, of course, you don’t know whether you’ll be speaking to the truth-teller or the liar. So what single question can you ask one of them that will enable you to figure out which door is which and make your escape?

 

OR:

 

Albert and Bernard just became friends with Cheryl, and they want to know when her birthday is. Cheryl gives them a list of 10 possible dates: May 15, May 16, May 19; June 17, June 18; July 14, July 16; August 14, August 15, August 17. Cheryl then tells Albert and Bernard separately the month and the day of her birthday respectively.

Albert: I don’t know when Cheryl’s birthday is, but I know that Bernard does not know, too.

Bernard: At first, I didn’t know when Cheryl’s birthday is, but I know now.

Albert: Then I also know when Cheryl’s birthday is.

So when is Cheryl’s birthday?

susangautsch's insight:

You’re in a dungeon with two doors. One leads to escape, the other to execution. There are only two other people in the room, one of whom always tells the truth, while the other always lies. You don’t know which is which, but they know that the other always lies or tells the truth. You can ask one of them one question, but, of course, you don’t know whether you’ll be speaking to the truth-teller or the liar. So what single question can you ask one of them that will enable you to figure out which door is which and make your escape?

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People's perceptions of you after a little nip & tuck

People's perceptions of you after a little nip & tuck | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it
People who underwent facelifts and/or lower eyebrow surgery were more likely to be judged as having certain positive qualities.

 

A new study reports that women who had undergone facial plastic surgery scored higher on all of those perceived traits than they did before the operation.

Traditionally, "the conversation about facial rejuvenation surgery has focused on one goal: Youthfulness," a research team led by Dr. Michael Reilly writes in the journal JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery. "However, human beings are judged throughout life based on many other characteristics and personal qualities conveyed by their faces."

 

The key result: The women viewed after their surgeries were rated higher for femininity, attractiveness, social skills, and likability. They also scored generally better on the other personality dimensions, although none of those increases rose to the level of statistical significance.


"The eyes and mouth have been identified as key triggers for the emotional response and judgment of an observer," the researchers write. "For example, the corner of the mouth is the diagnostic region for both happy and surprised expressions and plays an important role in the perception of personality traits, such as extroversion. A subtle upturn of the mouth and fullness in the cheeks can make a person look more intelligent and socially skilled. This appearance may explain why patients undergoing a facelift procedure ... are found to be significantly more likeable and socially skilled postoperatively."

susangautsch's insight:

So... this would mean everyone in LA is likable and trustworthy, yes?

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The Confidence Gap

The Confidence Gap | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it
Evidence shows that women are less self-assured than men—and that to succeed, confidence matters as much as competence. Here's why, and what to do about it.

 

Half a dozen global studies, conducted by the likes of Goldman Sachs and Columbia University, have found that companies employing women in large numbers outperform their competitors on every measure of profitability. Our competence has never been more obvious. Those who closely follow society’s shifting values see the world moving in a female direction.


In two decades of covering American politics, they have interviewed some of the most influential women in the nation. They were surprised to discover the extent to which these women suffered from self-doubt.  And yet, as we’ve worked, ever diligent, the men around us have continued to get promoted faster and be paid more. The statistics are well known: at the top, especially, women are nearly absent, and our numbers are barely increasing. Half a century since women first forced open the boardroom doors, our career trajectories still look very different from men’s.


Even as our understanding of confidence expanded, however, we found that our original suspicion was dead-on: there is a particular crisis for women—a vast confidence gap that separates the sexes. Compared with men, women don’t consider themselves as ready for promotions, they predict they’ll do worse on tests, and they generally underestimate their abilities. This disparity stems from factors ranging from upbringing to biology.

 

A growing body of evidence shows just how devastating this lack of confidence can be. Success, it turns out, correlates just as closely with confidence as it does with competence. No wonder that women, despite all our progress, are still woefully underrepresented at the highest levels. All of that is the bad news. The good news is that with work, confidence can be acquired. Which means that the confidence gap, in turn, can be closed.


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The Skills That Will Get You Hired In 2015

The Skills That Will Get You Hired In 2015 | Human Nature and Behavior | Scoop.it

It should come as no surprise that a college degree alone is no longer the golden ticket to a good career that it once was. ... The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) recently released the results of a survey in which they asked hiring managers what skills they would prioritize when recruiting in 2015.

The results might surprise you. Here are the top 10 responses:

Ability to work in a team structureAbility to make decisions and solve problems (tie)Ability to communicate verbally with people inside and outside an organizationAbility to plan, organize and prioritize workAbility to obtain and process information

You’ll notice that the first five are all soft skills, that is, skills and attributes that make a person able to interact with others effectively. They’re all part of your EQ, your emotional intelligence quotient. And you won’t find many college courses specifically dedicated to these skills.

susangautsch's insight:

Soft skills hit dominate "top skills" employers seek, but often aren't in college curricula, but they are at the Price School. PPD545 (on ground and online) cover all these topics and more. Don't blow this one off as fluffy stuff. These skills will more always be the ones that make or break you professionally. 

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