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Rescooped by Jukka Melaranta from History resources for South African Teachers
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The Trials of Hannah Arendt

The Trials of Hannah Arendt | Human Interest | Scoop.it

1 June 2015

Hannah Arendt’s five articles on the 1961 trial of Adolf Eichmann by the state of Israel appeared in The New Yorker in February and March 1963. They were published as Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil later that year. The book immediately set off a controversy that a half-century later shows no signs of abating.
The Eichmann fires are always smoldering, but what reignited them last fall was the appearance of Bettina Stangneth’s Eichmann Before Jerusalem, first published in Germany in 2011. Eichmann Before Jerusalem aims to reveal a depth of anti-Semitism in Eichmann that Arendt never quite grasped.


Via Andrew van Zyl
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The Archaeology News Network: When Arabia was green: Lush grasslands helped early man make leap out of Africa

The Archaeology News Network: When Arabia was green: Lush grasslands helped early man make leap out of Africa | Human Interest | Scoop.it

Via rita roberts
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Rescooped by Jukka Melaranta from Archaeology News
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Waterloo Uncovered

Waterloo Uncovered | Human Interest | Scoop.it
Waterloo Uncovered...  Historians have relied on first hand accounts that are unreliable and biased; vision often obscured by smoke, mind confused by battle noise, and no common method of timekeepi...

Via David Connolly
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Rescooped by Jukka Melaranta from Chinese American history
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From the wok to the frozen food aisle

From the wok to the frozen food aisle | Human Interest | Scoop.it

In honor of Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month, archivist Cathy Keen explores how a Chinese-American entrepreneur helped introduce new cuisines to the American diet in an affordable way: frozen foods. The Patrick F. Taylor Foundation Object Project, opening in July, will explore how social and technological changes, like new culinary preferences and advances in refrigeration, transformed everyday life.


Via John Jung
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John Jung's curator insight, May 18, 2:41 PM

"frozen foods pioneer, Percy Loy, was born in Vancouver, Washington, to Chinese immigrant parents.... Yet, like other Chinese-American pilots, Loy was unable to find work with a commercial airline after the war. He opened a Japanese restaurant, feeling it would be perceived as more high-end than a Chinese one. Ultimately, however, the more successful venture proved to be selling his native cuisine in the form of frozen meals."

Rescooped by Jukka Melaranta from Teaching and Learning with Primary Sources
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Postcards of World War I

Postcards of World War I | Human Interest | Scoop.it
Home page of the South Dakota State Historical Society, Pierre, S.D. An office within the Department of Tourism and Economic Development, the Society manages five programs-- archaeology, archives, historic preservation, museum, and research and publishing.

Via David McMullen
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David McMullen's curator insight, May 18, 9:23 PM

over 90 postcard images of World War I 

Rescooped by Jukka Melaranta from Egyptology and Archaeology
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‘Heritage Taskforce’ takes antiquities ministry to court over Hellenistic site demolition

‘Heritage Taskforce’ takes antiquities ministry to court over Hellenistic site demolition | Human Interest | Scoop.it

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Rescooped by Jukka Melaranta from Exploring Cemeteries, Wrecks and Ghost Towns
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Old Abandoned Looking and Restored Trains / Locomotives at Pennsylvania Railroad Museum - YouTube

Hello and Welcome to my channel of Urban Exploration also known as Urbex. I explore the lost and forgotten places that are invisible to many. I photograph an...

Via Laura Brown
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Rescooped by Jukka Melaranta from Exploration: Urban, Rural and Industrial
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Timeline Photos - Matthew Henry Photography | Facebook

Timeline Photos - Matthew Henry Photography | Facebook | Human Interest | Scoop.it
I love photographing the Carbide Mill Ruins in Gatineau Park. Some many different angles to photograph it from....

Via Laura Brown
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Rescooped by Jukka Melaranta from Industrial Heritage
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UK: London's lost Tube stations to see commercial revival

UK: London's lost Tube stations to see commercial revival | Human Interest | Scoop.it
Restaurants, art galleries and a cinema are planned for one disused Mayfair station.

Via David Worth
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Rescooped by Jukka Melaranta from History and Social Studies Education
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Historian Says Don't 'Sanitize' How Our Government Created Ghettos

Historian Says Don't 'Sanitize' How Our Government Created Ghettos | Human Interest | Scoop.it

"We have a myth today that the ghettos in metropolitan areas around the country are what the Supreme Court calls 'de-facto' — just the accident of the fact that people have not enough income to move into middle class neighborhoods or because real estate agents steered black and white families to different neighborhoods or because there was white flight.  It was not the unintended effect of benign policies, it was an explicit, racially purposeful policy that was pursued at all levels of government, and that's the reason we have these ghettos today and we are reaping the fruits of those policies."


Tags: economicrace, racism, historical, neighborhoodpodcast, urban, place, poverty, socioeconomic.


Via Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by Jukka Melaranta from History resources for South African Teachers
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▶ Mansa Musa, one of the wealthiest people who ever lived - TED-Ed

Published on May 18, 2015
Mansa Musa, the 14th century African king of the Mali Empire, is said to have amassed a fortune that possibly made him one of the wealthiest people who ever lived. Jessica Smith tells the story of how Mansa Musa literally put his empire – and himself – on the map.


Via Andrew van Zyl
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