Human Geography
17.9K views | +6 today
Follow
Human Geography
AP Human Geo Resources
Curated by Matthew Wahl
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Matthew Wahl from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Redistricting

How can cartography swing and election?  Simple.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Miroslav Milosavljević's comment, July 27, 2013 5:56 PM
This great video example may serve students for a better understanding the term. Well done!
Dean Haakenson's curator insight, July 28, 2013 10:40 AM
Thanks Seth Dixon for Scooping this! And thanks Mr. Burton for rescooping. Great lesson for government and geography.
Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:14 AM
this video shows the process from which political candidates win their respective elections. gerrymandering is an illegal use of power in the respect to redistricting and moving town lines in order to pump up voting power. this is an illegal action that happens countless times in elections and taper to higher powers. this gerrymandering idea takes the voter power to elect and puts it into the hands of the actual political personnel. by reshaping you can stack votes into one particular area this way you are guaranteed to win that district. this is where you see districts with these crazy shaped areas rather than nice square or other simple shapes.
Rescooped by Matthew Wahl from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

Latitude and Longitude of a Point

Latitude and Longitude of a Point | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Find the latitude and longitude of a point using Google Maps.


Simple, straightforward and easy to use.  All you do is point and click on the map to get latitude and longitude in both decimal degrees and DMS (degrees, minutes and seconds).  You can also quickly enter coordinates in either format an have the location displayed on the map.


Tags: GPS, mapping, location.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Wade Lytal's curator insight, August 26, 2015 4:23 PM

This can help with your homework assignment. 

Rescooped by Matthew Wahl from Daily Geography
Scoop.it!

OverlapMaps - Instantly compare any two places on Earth!

OverlapMaps - Instantly compare any two places on Earth! | Human Geography | Scoop.it
An OverlapMap is a map of one part of the world that overlaps a different part of the world. OverlapMaps show relative size.

 

The above overlap map is the United Kingdom compared to the state of Pennsylvania.  This is an very simple way to demonstrate the true size of remote places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper.  


Via Seth Dixon, Jarett Schiebel
more...
Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 4:07 PM
This toll will and can provide a reliable mapping source to geographers everywhere. It is useful and fun. A neat way to learn cartography
Josiah Melchor's comment, September 12, 2012 11:31 PM
The OverlapMap is a very useful tool that will allow a user to compare different places and parts of the world. Having a more accurate size of a place is critical when comparing 2 or more places. I think that many users besides me will find this very convenient when other resources are not available.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 21, 2014 11:48 PM

The above overlap map is the United Kingdom compared to the state of Pennsylvania.  This is a very simple way to demonstrate the true size of remote places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper. 

Rescooped by Matthew Wahl from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

Novels on Location

Novels on Location | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A Google-Maps/Amazon mash-up for finding books that take place where you're traveling. Search the map and make your next destination come alive!

 

This site has the potential to merge geography and social studies education with English and literature studies. This site, Novels on Location let's you search for book titles using Google Maps to scroll through the collection. However, there are very few geo-coded titles at the moment, but with some help, this could be a fantastic resource.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Matthew Wahl from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What Do We Mean by 'Reading' Maps?

What Do We Mean by 'Reading' Maps? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The common-core standards present an ambiguous message on how to draw information from maps and charts, Phil Gersmehl says.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
mufidmmn's comment, July 24, 2013 4:08 AM
ngapain itu ya
Taryn Coxall's curator insight, August 5, 2013 9:38 PM

This is a resource i feel would be relevant to those students who struggle to be egaged in their reading

This can be used on readers on many different level

the reading maps foccus on language arts, Its description is communicated through charts, graphs, and maps intead of normal paragraphs and text

Shelby Porter's comment, September 30, 2013 11:19 AM
I feel the skill of reading a map is very important, but it becoming less prevalent in classrooms. Teachers may find it more difficult to teach and therefore are not going in depth with it. I remember as a child in grade school we would color maps or have to find where the states are. We never were taught how to fully understand the uses of a map and all the different ways they are used and how to read them. It is becoming a lost skill in a world that needs to be more appreciative of geography.
Rescooped by Matthew Wahl from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click the both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.    

Rescooped by Matthew Wahl from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A Cartographic Rendering of Panem

A Cartographic Rendering of Panem | Human Geography | Scoop.it

The Hunger Games fascination is at a high-water mark, and this dystopian Young Adult novel is set in a futuristic, post-apocalyptic, North America. While much of what was written isn’t geographically accurate, the capital and the districts that serve as its hinterland have numerous clues that connect with the current (and actual) geography of North America. Why not try to map it? While not an “accurate” project, this can be a fun way to infuse geography into an English class or vice versa. What would your map of Panem look like? How come?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
jpainter's comment, March 25, 2012 9:14 PM
I have a lesson based on this and alliances on my website https://sites.google.com/a/salem.k12.va.us/painter/home/ideas-for-teachers
Seth Dixon's comment, March 25, 2012 9:48 PM
@jpainter: I love it! Thank you so much for sharing.
Rescooped by Matthew Wahl from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Hunger Games: Map of Panem

Hunger Games: Map of Panem | Human Geography | Scoop.it

As a former children's librarian, this is the perfect merger of some of my interests.  The Hunger Games, a Young Adult dystopian novel (movie coming soon) takes place in a post-WWIII North America with 13 districts noted for particular resources.  For example, district 4 specialized in fishing and district 12's economy centered on coal.  For middle schools that teach integrate units with social studies and English, this would be a very engaging, current connection. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
picky's comment, March 21, 2012 5:40 PM
Phoenix, AZ, at 1100ft above present sea level, is shown underwater. Cincinnati, OH, at 900ft above present sea level, is shown still above water. This map makes no sense. Using a Panem map for teaching geology is a great idea, but don't use it to reinforce the false idea that "farther inland" means "higher."
Seth Dixon's comment, March 21, 2012 7:57 PM
Certainly this isn't a geologically accurate map (just like Waterworld was a fictitious world that couldn't exist). Yet in the book Hunger Games, there are elements of North American geography that are a part of this fictitious geography, even if it is not expected to be geographically accurate. Your point is most certainly well taken that further inland does not mean higher elevation.
Danielle Lip's curator insight, January 26, 2015 4:39 PM

This map of the Hunger Games location can help a young adult to make connections to the world we live in and with a movie/book that many children and adults adore. The districts all have different specialities and are spread out on a United States Map, I as a student would have the opportunity to see that where I live today would not be part of the districts post WWIII. This map could start a debate and discussion about English ( the book ) as well as Social Studies( the map) making connections to the world we live in today. Another way that this map can help children to learn is to place an actual map over the Panem map to help children become intrigued and see what could happen if there was a WWIII.