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AP Human Geo Resources
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Border Economies: the Maquiladora Export Landscape

Border Economies: the Maquiladora Export Landscape | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Maquiladoras are a well-known example of developed countries outsourcing factory work that is cited as a factor leading to de-industrialization in the Northeastern USA.  While many geography classes discuss this macro spatial reorganization, this link challenges us to look at the micro spatial systems of maquiladoras that make them economically efficient.  Some good graphs, maps and images.  


Via Seth Dixon
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Derek Ethier's comment, September 20, 2012 10:15 PM
Developed countries outsourcing jobs has become largely beneficial for developing countries. In the case of Mexico, the residents are given new opportunities in manufacturing jobs that they may have never had before. The industrialization of the border area can only lead to increasing development and hopefully a better standard of living for citizens. Unfortunately, it has the exact opposite effect on the U.S., which is giving away jobs.
Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 26, 2012 11:14 AM
This article is displaying the postive and negative side effects that these Maquiladoras have upon the development of stronger economic economies for such countries as Mexico. These buisnesss that invest in the border of Mexico allow these towns/cities to grow and become industrilized. This provides low skill work for the people of Mexico but the logistics of the companies are still being done in the country that has invested in these places. This is good because it lets countries like the United States keep educated/high paying jobs in the States. The negative aspect is that the only jobs the Mexicans recieve are the low paying uneducated type. However still it has postives for both countries and its something we must get used to because its the way of the future.
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Where is my Milk From?

Where is my Milk From? | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Find out which dairy your milk comes from!

 

Too often we have heard the answer "from the grocery store!"  With more thought, the farm would be the next answer, but what kind of farm?  Which farm? Where is coming from?  All you need to arm your students to make the commodity chain more personal is the code on the carton and this link, and they are on their way to exploring the geography of industrial agriculture (more likely than not).  This site is designed to help consumer become more aware of the geography of diary production and to get to know where the products that we are putting in are body are coming from.  So, where does your milk come from? 


Via Seth Dixon, Mr. David Burton
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Kim Vignale's comment, July 23, 2012 7:52 PM
This is a great tool to find out where your milk is coming from and it also helps you decide which brand to buy to support local farms and reduce carbon emissions from the transportation of these dairy products to your local supermarkets. I think this tool help promotes local farms which is also a great way of supporting local businesses.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 3, 2013 6:20 PM

Too often we have heard the answer "from the grocery store!"  With more thought, the farm would be the next answer, but what kind of farm?  Which farm? Where is it coming from?  All you need to arm your students to make the commodity chain more personal is the code on the carton and this link, and they are on their way to exploring the geography of industrial agriculture (more likely than not).  This site is designed to help consumer become more aware of the geography of diary production and to get to know where the products that we are putting in are body are coming from.  My milk (consumed in Cranston, RI) is from Guida's Milk and Ice Cream from New Britain, CT.  So, where does your milk come from?

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 4, 2013 2:39 PM

I loved reading about this site and there idea. its so ture that too often we say "from the grochry store" when asked were this cheese or food product is from. However acutlly knowing that animal that produced the food, before it was packed and shipped out, is a very cool things that technollagy in the 21st century  is allowing us to do. Its funny when i was on my study abrod trip in mexico and we bought some goat cheese from a rancho there,, i tried to ask how he made it, but he thought i ment who made it and he walked me over and pointed to the goat that he had gotten it from. 

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Containerization Shaped Globalization

Sometimes a single unlikely idea can have massive impact across the world. Sir Harold Evans, the author of They Made America, describes how frustration drove...

 

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today. 


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Ben Fullman's comment, September 14, 8:06 PM
Contain or remain.
global or insane
effect what we do in the world we live "todayne."
what will it be like in 50 years, only your children will "sayne."
I would containerize, but i definitely wouldn't
John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, September 14, 10:26 PM

It is astonishing how such a simple idea can improve productivity.  Containerization established an efficient system that revolutionized the transportation of products. The product was secure, the containers were easy to organize and could be stacked on top of each other thus increasing the volume of product being shipped. Even though containerization has helped with the concept of globalization, it still has its defects. Jobs decreased due to the loss of “break bulk shipping.” Containerization also makes it easier for criminals to smuggle contraband. Drugs, weapons and even animals can be smuggled.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 10:52 AM

The concept of containerization saves time and is essentially the reason why we have globalization. Just as McLean's concept made shipping faster, cheaper and more efficient, it also eliminated the jobs of the workers who loaded the ships. Sometimes, globalization has negative aspects such as taking away jobs in order to make something available to a consumer faster and cheaper.

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Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds

Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds | Human Geography | Scoop.it
An amazing 26-second video depicting how temperatures around the globe have warmed since 1880.

Via Nathan Phillips, Seth Dixon
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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:09 AM

I wonder why the climate is changing so much it seems to be devastating. It can probably affect a lot of people because many people depend on a certain type of weather to grow food or do anything else that involves the weather like going for a swim in a pool or lake. The weather is something that many people need and depend on. Many people want the heat because they cant be in a cold area or vise versa. 

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 12, 2013 7:13 PM

A great visual dispay showing how tempetures have flucuated over the past 130 years and the futer implications of climate change today. Thoughout the video it shows how the tempeture is chaging (rising and falling) all acorss the board. However you cleary see at the end that tempeture stop flucuating and only contiues to rise. While over all it is only a 1 or 2 dagree differnce, its clear that if we go 80 years with a stable tempture and then it starts to only get warmer that weve got a climate change problam on our hands.