Human Geography
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Human Geography
AP Human Geo Resources
Curated by Matthew Wahl
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Religion and Demographics

http://www.ted.com Hans Rosling had a question: Do some religions have a higher birth rate than others -- and how does this affect global population growth? ...

 

What are the connections between religion and demographics?  How does this impact population structure in a particular country?  I found this video from Jeff Martin's fabulous website; Check it out!  http://www.martinsaphug.com/  


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Juliette Norwood's curator insight, January 13, 2014 9:21 AM

This can be viewed in the perspective of a citizen of an LDC. In LDCs, there are religions that cause the woman to be subservient to men. A higher birth rate could be the cause. If these  small religions were to distribute and be adhered to, there could possibly be a spike in the birth rate.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:35 PM

Unit 2

Alex Smiga's curator insight, October 4, 2015 11:50 AM

Hans raps about religion and babies

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If the World Where a Village of 100 People...

What if the world's population were reduced to 100 people community?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners.  For more information see: http://www.miniature-earth.com/


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Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5?

Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5? | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Eighty-two years after the original development of the four stage Demographic Transition Model (DTM) by the late demographer Warren Thompson (1887-1973), the cracks are starting to show on the model that for many years revolutionized how we think about the geography of our global population. 


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:33 PM

In my opinion, I do not think that the world could be approaching stage 5. I'm not sure if the world as a whole will ever reach stage 5. Our population is increasing and even though birth rates are low I still think that stage 4 is where we will be stuck. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, March 25, 2015 6:52 PM

This article discusses the demographic transition model, mostly Stage 5. Stage 5 is still slightly an unknown thing, because many people argue whether there are any countries in that phase or not. Stage 5 is characterized with very low birth rates, low death rates, lots of family oriented planning, and a slow decrease in population. Some people argue Germany is already in this stage, but I don't really agree. 

I think we should focus more on the developing countries that are stuck in stage 2. 

USA is in stage 4, and I believe that we will be stuck here for a while before advancing to stage 5. 

This is a good article for people that are interested in this unit to read, it gives a new perspective on things. 

Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:44 AM

Summary- With his Demographic Transition Model, Warren Thompson suggested that we are in the midst of a transition shown by stage 4, in which birth rates are equaling death rates. But if we analyze the demography in the present day, we will find that we are already past that stage. Most countries in the world are now entering or already in stage 5, in which birth rates are lower than death rates, making it very difficult, if not impossible for the population to grow. These current trends have led to an increased empowerment of women in western countries, since less babies mean more working hours, and more profits. It has also allowed for inter-generational relationships within families, where a children is able to meet his grandparents and even his great grandparents. In Europe, the birth rate is currently below the replacement level. The only way Europe has been able to increase or at least maintain its population is through waves of immigration.

 

Insight- it's is incredible that we are taught that we are experiencing the fourth stage of the Demographic Transition model, and that stage 5 talks about the future. What we may have not noticed is that many countries of the world are already part of that future; they have started to be part of this stage without us realizing it. I really liked the prediction made in the last paragraph. The fertility increase in more developed countries can take us to a new stage 6 in Thompson's model.

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Interactive maps: Mexico-USA migration channels

Interactive maps: Mexico-USA migration channels | Human Geography | Scoop.it
In several previous posts we have looked at specific migration channels connecting Mexico to the USA: From Morelos to Minnesota; case study of a migrant...

 

This is an excellent way to show examples of chain migration and the gravity model...students will understand the concepts with concretes examples. These interactive maps have crisp geo-visualizations of the migratory flows.


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 3, 2015 4:09 PM

When it comes to ethnic groups in the United States, many of the hispanic/mexican ancestors occur in the southwestern area of the United States. That's obviously because Mexico is southwest of the United States. When it comes to emigrating from Mexico, individuals immigrate to the United States (mostly southwest of the United States) so they can live a different, hopefully better economy. Plus, they try to escape the gang violence and drug violence in Mexico.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 2015 1:05 PM

This is a good representation of chain migration.

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, April 3, 2015 1:46 PM

Migration

This map show the most popular migratory flows of migration from Mexico to the US. 

This ties into our unit about migration because many Mexicans migrate to the US every year. This map shows the patterns and paths of the migration. 

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China's One-Child Policy

China's One-Child Policy | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:26 PM

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:04 PM

Very simple and easy to interpret graph on the One child policy in China. When thinking about the "has it been successful" section I was troubled. Yes the government came close to its goal of 1.2 Billion but do so they prevented 400 million births. So its successful because they almost hit the mark but at what costs? Natal policies can leave countries without enough people to repopulate the workforce, we have to keep this in mind. Controlling population is a dangerous project.. 

Daniel Eggen's curator insight, February 9, 2015 8:13 PM

Great infographic on the One Child Policy. Based on the birth rates in other countries in the East Asia region, how much demographic change may there have been in China without the implementation of this policy? 

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The Miniature Earth Project

The Miniature Earth Project | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Miniature Earth. What if the population of the world were reduced into a community of only 100 people?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this infographic and website attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners. 


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Emma Lupo's curator insight, October 21, 2014 1:10 AM

Intro to liveability

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7 Billion: How Did We Get So Big So Fast?

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial distinctions (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings at different scales). 


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Mackenzie Mcneal :)'s curator insight, August 27, 2014 9:44 AM

This video shows how the populations of each country  are  increasing and decreasing in a very unique way. It explains how the populations are increasing and decreasing as the years go on.  It also shows that the death rates and the birth rates are  being combined to make the true populations as accurate as possible.

Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 7, 2014 9:13 PM

This video is good at helping people better visualize population because you can easily see the difference of each continent. It shows how the population started small and rapidly expanded because of the agricultural and industrial revolution and decrease in deaths making it and the births unstablized. It even goes on to talk about the future population and how it is believed that the population won't continue to grow rapidly but once again stabalize.