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Human Geography
AP Human Geo Resources
Curated by Matthew Wahl
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OTL: 2014 World Cup: Will Brazil Be Ready?

ESPN Video: With the FIFA World Cup two years away, will Brazil be ready to host soccers premiere event?
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How to feed a planet

How to feed a planet | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Why the world needs an agricultural revolution in AfricaTHIS chart is the nearest thing to a snapshot of everything you need to know about feeding the world.
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Concentric Zones of Building Age in Chicago

Concentric Zones of Building Age in Chicago | Human Geography | Scoop.it
    Hughie, hold my halo. I’m sick of being a saint: Got to teach youngsters To hit ‘em where they ain’t. -Ogden Nash   Many of the original and innovative contributions to the field o...
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Water and Development

Water and Development | Human Geography | Scoop.it

When access to clean drinking water is an issue, it creates a web of developmental problems for a community.  For a video with more information about water/development statistics, but the organization http://charitywater.org see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCHhwxvQqxg&feature=player_embedded


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David 's comment, May 21, 2012 11:58 PM
thank you for your awesome information
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Infographic: In 80 Years, We Lost 93% Of Variety In Our Food Seeds

Infographic: In 80 Years, We Lost 93% Of Variety In Our Food Seeds | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Seeds are tricky things. On one hand, we have the whole Omnivore’s Dilemma argument, that industrialized and genetically engineered food is probably bad.
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United Nations Millennium Development Goals

Ban Ki-moon announces that leaders of Indonesia, Liberia & UK will co-chair #post2015 development activities panel: http://t.co/Dlg67hcQ...

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Co-operative farming from El Salvador to Kentucky [VIDEO]

Co-operative farming from El Salvador to Kentucky [VIDEO] | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Meet a farmer who's brought the co-operative farming method from his home in El Salvador to Louisville, Ky., where he coordinates a large urban farm.
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TED Blog | Flip this lesson! A new way to teach with video from TED-Ed

Announcing a new way to use video to create customized lessons: the...
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Devolution: A Beginner's Guide

Devolution: A Beginner's Guide | Human Geography | Scoop.it
What is devolution and how has it changed how Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales are governed?

 

This article with videos, charts and images was designed as a primer for UK voters for the 2010 election to understand who devolution in Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland were reshaping the political landscape in the United Kingdom.  It is general enough that even though it is outdated as a news story, it serves as a concrete example from geography students to understand the processes and reasons for a decentralization of political power.


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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 6, 2013 9:51 PM

The devolution of the United Kingdom is taking place at a legistlative level right now- if/when will Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland vote to actually secede? The article made mention that people in Britain are starting to get angry that they are subsidizing programs in Scotland that the English pay for themselves. What are the benefits to being a part of the United Kingdom? What's the best balance of power for all involved?

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:21 PM

This shift can reshape the countries in many ways, financially, and the over all quality of life. A place will do better with connections than standing alone. This may help with international relation issues and build new relationships. When places depend on one another it can reshape the Country. It can also help with investment and jobs. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 11:44 AM

The parliament in London is shifting more power to Scotland and other areas in what is called devolution.  This reflects a push for more independence of countries in the UK that are not England. In order to keep the UK together concessions must be made, this devolution is the British Parliament's efforts to keep the UK intact.

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Empowering Women a 'triple win' for Sustainable Development

Vimeo is a respectful community of creative people who are passionate about sharing the videos they make. Use Vimeo if you want the best tools and highest quality video in the universe.

 

To successfully create a sustainable society, you need development in three areas: social, economic and environmental sustainability.  Gender empowerment, many argue is the key to creating a society that not only is more just, but is more sustainable.  For more read: http://www.rtcc.org/living/eu-summit-empowering-women-a-triple-win-for-sustainable-development/


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Justice Dept. approves Florida's district maps

Justice Dept. approves Florida's district maps | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The U.S. Department of Justice on Monday approved the Legislature's plans for new congressional, House and Senate districts, paving the way for the state to begin using the maps in preparation for the November elections.
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For the Unemployed, Geography Can Be Destiny

For the Unemployed, Geography Can Be Destiny | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Not every place and every citizen has been affected by the recession the same way...
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Persian or Iranian? Is there a Difference?

Persian or Iranian?  Is there a Difference? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Over the next few months, Ajam Media Collective will host a series that focuses on and describes various elements of the cultural, ethnic and linguistic mosaic that we refer to collectively as Iran...

 

What is in a name?  We know that there are subtle differences between Hispanic, Indigenous, Latino and Mexican that are bound with the history of these words and how they have been used by both insiders and outsiders to construct identity.  Likewise, the distinctions between the terms Persian and Iranian are often used interchangeably.  However there are political, ethnic, linguistic and religious connotations that shape the meanings behind these terms.  While I don't necessarily agree with all of the arguments, this is an interesting look at the historical roots of these distinctions and the ramifications of these terms.   


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Ms. Harrington's comment, July 3, 2012 11:17 PM
This is interesting, I have wondered this myself, when hearing a person describe themselves as Persian. The article goes on to say being Persian is a cultural subset of Iranians, who share a common language and culture. It can be conditered a cultural or political statement to call ones self Persian rather than Iranian.
Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 11:23 AM

This has always been a question between my friends and I, as one of my friends identifies as Persian. In my limited experience in the US it seems that the people who identify themselves as Iranian have immigrated in the last two generations or so. In comparison to families which came over quite a few generations ago who refer to themselves as "Persian"

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 29, 3:58 PM

When speaking about this topic it is important to recognize that Iranian and Persian are not the same. I believe in this classification as well as others placing people into groups of any kind can be dangerous. I enjoyed the comedy routine included in this article by Persian-Iranian-American comic Maz Jobrani. I thought it was very clever how he poked fun at the fact that he prefers to be called Persian at times because in this post 9-11 world it seems "softer". I thought it was hilarious how he mentioned cats and rugs and tried to emphasize the "softer" side of Persia.

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Good news from Africa

Good news from Africa | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Africa is experiencing some of the biggest falls in child mortality ever seen
CHILD mortality in Africa has plummeted, belying the continent’s “hopeless” reputation.
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In praise of North Korea and Uzbekistan

In praise of North Korea and Uzbekistan | Human Geography | Scoop.it
MOST people’s reaction to numbers which claim to describe the state of the world is a wary acceptance. The statistics are probably a bit bogus but what else is there to go on?
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What is Geo-literacy?

Geo-literacy extends far beyond knowing where places are on a map.  National Geographic Education has put an emphasis on geoliteracy, which entails spatial thinking skills and understanding systems in addition to content knowledge about locations and places. 


Via Seth Dixon, Mr. David Burton
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Adam Lenaarts's curator insight, September 30, 2013 6:33 PM

Geo literacy explained to all people that don't know I Teacher Much more than just places...

Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 1, 2013 10:32 AM

Geo-literacy extends far beyond knowing where places are on a map.  National Geographic Education has put an emphasis on geo-literacy, which entails spatial thinking skills and understanding systems in addition to content knowledge about locations and places.

Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 28, 11:09 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concepts of geo-literacy and spatial perspective because it indicates that for a population to be knowledgeable about geography, it must go above the mere rote memorization of toponyms and instead explore the spatial characteristics of places.

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China's One-Child Policy

China's One-Child Policy | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


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Yuanyuan Kelly's curator insight, March 4, 2013 9:27 AM

A really cool infograph regarding China's one child policy!

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:26 PM

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2:04 PM

Very simple and easy to interpret graph on the One child policy in China. When thinking about the "has it been successful" section I was troubled. Yes the government came close to its goal of 1.2 Billion but do so they prevented 400 million births. So its successful because they almost hit the mark but at what costs? Natal policies can leave countries without enough people to repopulate the workforce, we have to keep this in mind. Controlling population is a dangerous project.. 

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Women in parliament

Women in parliament | Human Geography | Scoop.it
ALMOST 20% of the world’s parliamentary seats are now occupied by women, up from 17.2% five years ago, according to the Inter-Parliamentary Union.
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How Gandhi made tea taboo

How Gandhi made tea taboo | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Tea is one of India's most popular beverages and may soon become the national drink. But for many years, it was considered a poison.
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Hugo Chávez’s Totally Bizarre Talk Show

Hugo Chávez’s Totally Bizarre Talk Show | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Hugo Chávez’s long-running, totally bizarre talk show, “Aló Presidente,” is both a throwback to an earlier era and a completely different kind of reality TV.
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25 US Mega Corporations: Where They Rank If They Were Countries

25 US Mega Corporations: Where They Rank If They Were Countries | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The real powerful states of the world....
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True Size of Africa

True Size of Africa | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Online maps that we use for directions use the Mercator projection, and this tends to dictate how we perceive the size of countries and continents. If you look at the world map on Google, for example, Africa doesn't look that much bigger compared to China or the United States. In reality though, it's a lot bigger. Kai Krause scales countries by their area in square kilometers and then fits them into a Africa's borders for some perspective.


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It’s official: China now eats twice the meat we do

It’s official: China now eats twice the meat we do | Human Geography | Scoop.it
China's meat consumption has changed a lot in the last 20 years -- so much so that corn to feed industrially raised animals is now more prevalent than rice.
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India's Census: Lots Of Cellphones, Too Few Toilets

The results of India's once-in-a-decade census reveal a country of 1.2 billion people where millions have access to the latest technology, but millions more lack sanitation and drinking water.

 

More Indians are entering the middle class as personal wealth is transforming South Asia's economy in the private sector.  Yet the government's ability to provide public services to match that growth still lags behind.  Why would it be that it is easier to get a cell phone than a toilet in India?  What will that mean for development?  


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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 10:10 AM

Government in India may be ill equipped to handle the need for sewage, sanitation and clean water. These items are harder to come by than cell phones and televisions. Over 1/2 of the country lacks basic sanitation, but yet, have cell phones. This dystopia is leading to even people climbing out of poverty from having some of the basics needed for a healthy life.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 29, 3:41 PM

Its interesting in a country as large as India, its number one problem is waste management. Its telling of the priorities of the country's leader and it also speaks on the country's reception of first world waste. While more than half of Indians have access to a cell phone device, television and other electronic products, its also embarrassing on the country's behalf that less than half of the country's population have access to toilets.

I believe the case for this is Indian government not have the proper equipment to be able to establish properly install proper sanitation in the land. In order for the government to put in place they would need to establish a proper pipelines throughout the land to ensure that once toilets are set in place, waste is properly disposed of.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 12:59 AM

This sound clip highlights an interesting issue today in India, as the population has exploded the logistics to support these people is nonexistent while access to modern technology is present. Its an odd concept that one can readily find cheap accessible technology such as cell phones or TVs yet something as basic as a toilet or running water is out of reach for many. This is the problem when a population expands faster than it is possible to increase its logistical capacity.