Human Geography
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Top 10 Companies in the US that Control Your Choices | Social Media and Social Good

Top 10 Companies in the US that Control Your Choices | Social Media and Social Good | Human Geography | Scoop.it
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The corporations that control the majority of what Americans eat...not much variety.

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African-American-Chinese

African-American-Chinese | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The UNDP's favoured measure of progress throws up some intriguing comparisonsGROSS domestic product, Robert F. Kennedy said, “measures everything…except that...
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In A Grain Of Golden Rice, A World Of Controversy Over GMO Foods | Geography Education

In A Grain Of Golden Rice, A World Of Controversy Over GMO Foods | Geography Education | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A rice enriched with beta-carotene promises to boost the health of poor children around the world.

Via Mr. David Burton
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APHG Graduate Certificate Program

APHG Graduate Certificate Program | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"More than 96,000 students took the AP Human Geography exam in 2012 and it is estimated that there are 3,200 AP Human Geography teachers nationwide. As demand for APHG exams increase, so will the demand for qualified teachers." 


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Heather Ramsey's comment, March 6, 2013 8:33 PM
This is awesome! In my opinion, there are not enough graduate programs in Geography Education, especially online. Thanks for posting this information!
Sharla Shults's curator insight, March 8, 2013 6:36 PM

Movements toward increased and better education are always an added plus!

Greg Hill's comment, March 10, 2013 3:45 PM
This is great
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Global State of Agriculture

Global State of Agriculture | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:30 AM

Unit V, main idea of the unit!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 15, 2014 10:00 AM

Unit 5

Mrs. B's curator insight, March 23, 6:02 AM

This conveys some important realities about the demographic necessities of agriculture, the economic impact and the cultural differences in agricultural production. As with all long infographics on this site, you can "scroll down" on the image by putting the cursor in the top right-hand corner of the image and sliding on the translucent bar. 


Tags: agriculture, infographic, unit 5 agriculture.

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Silent Plains … The Fading Sounds of Native Languages

Silent Plains … The Fading Sounds of Native Languages | Human Geography | Scoop.it
‘All things must pass,’ sang George Harrison. With time, suns turn into ice, civilizations into dust, and species go extinct. And so ‘black dwarfs,’ ‘biodiversity loss,’ not to forget ‘Armageddon,’ have all become part of our daily alphabet.
Matthew Wahl's insight:

In the Continental United States, Native langues are being lost at an alarming rate. With globalization and development, linguistic diversity and ultimately culture can be lost. A number of less-developed places with the highest ecological diversity, such as Papua New Guinea, have the highest linguistic diversity as well.

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Containerization Shaped Globalization

Sometimes a single unlikely idea can have massive impact across the world. Sir Harold Evans, the author of They Made America, describes how frustration drove...

 

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 7:48 PM

Globalization has connected the world in such a way that we hadn't thought possible. This idea has created rising economies all over the world and has made transport of goods and services move faster and continues to increase this rate with advances in technology. Containerization is a staple of globalization and without it, none of these products would be able to get from country to country. In essence it has developed the world of import and exports. To add to this success, globalization has also created jobs and communities which revolve heavily around the transport of goods. It saves time by using massive containers to move goods and it creates opportunities in places where it had not been possible before. 

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, May 27, 2015 3:45 AM

I believe this video is very interesting. It tells us that everything we have today is thanks to globalization and the reason we have it so fast is because of shipping containers! In the video it told me that before my time it was impossible to get swordfish from Japan or cheeses from France, but now thanks to globalization it is all possible. Globalization is even behind the reason how our phones were made! 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:28 AM

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today.  This is a very useful video.  

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Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century

Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century | Human Geography | Scoop.it
New nations seem to pop up with alarming regularity. At the start of the 20th century, there were only a few dozen independent sovereign states on the planet; today, there are nearly 200!

Via Seth Dixon
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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:38 AM

Amazing to see many of the countries and empires that are no longer around.  Also with the dissoution of many of the empires it lead's to many of the issues that were are dealiing with today.  Splitting the Austro-Hugaraian Empire after WWI along ethnic lines didn't really work and helped to lead to WWII.  The Germans in the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia fro example.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sudetendeutsche_gebiete.svg

 for the area of German population.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:01 PM

10 countries that have become nonexistent in the 20th century include Tibet, East Germany and Yugoslavia. These countries have died off because of ethic, religious and cultural falls that were quickly taken over by bigger and more powerful countries.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 9:13 PM

Essentially this article boils down to the issues of religion, ethnicity and nationalism.  People who are diverse and have different ideas generally cannot all live together under one rule and agree on everything, hence nations split and new ones form to cater to their own beliefs and similarities.

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Up in Smoke part 1: the beginning of the end for slash-and-burn farming? – video

The first in a series of videos on the consequences to the Honduran rainforest of slash-and-burn farming.

Via Samuel Reeves
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Geography game: how well do you know the world?

Geography game: how well do you know the world? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Play the Global development game: identify the world's countries and territories, rank them according to GDP then fingers at the ready for the picture round

Via Seth Dixon
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Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, December 22, 2012 3:42 AM

Geography game

Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 26, 2012 6:46 AM

Are you ready?

 

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 12, 2013 12:07 AM

Ughhhhhh, this is addicting. Must stop playing. Must keep playing so I can beat JC.

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Faiths and the faithless

Faiths and the faithless | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The world's religious make-upRELIABLE data on the age and whereabouts of the religious and irreligious are hard to come by, which makes a new report on the...
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IfItWereMyHome.com

IfItWereMyHome.com | Human Geography | Scoop.it

How to foster geographic empathy in the classroom discussion about development? Here's one way.  This link compares MANY countries' demographics in a very personal manner. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 26, 2012 9:29 PM
Globalization discussions about raising disparity within countries often overshadow the growing inequalities between countries. What qualifies as middle class in the United States can be the equivalent of an upper-class lifestyle for many nations around the world. The same can be said in comparing what the poor in America have access to in comparison to many developing countries.
Mr. Verdugo's curator insight, March 21, 2013 10:08 PM

North - South. Here we have a glance of the differences

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 8:54 AM

A great resource to compare the liveability of countries using a range of criteria. 

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A Military World

A Military World | Human Geography | Scoop.it
World military spending for 2011 is estimated to be over $1.7 trillion at current prices, and has come to a relative stagnation after it has been steadily rising in recent years. As summarised on t...
Matthew Wahl's insight:

Very powerful cartogram representing military expenditures globally. 

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South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country

South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country | Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 5:08 PM

South Sudan recently gained its independence from Sudan. South Sudan is now home to 10-12 million people and is the 193rd member of the United Nations. However, just because South Sudan became independent from Sudan does not mean it does not no longer carry some of the remaining issues.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 1:26 PM

This infographic gives an idea of why South Sudan seceded from the rest of the country. Decades of civil war preceded the secession, and it is clear the cultural differences between the two areas were a contributing factor. South Sudan is a part of the fertile Sahel, with the majority of its people Christian, while Sudan is mostly desert, with the majority of its people Muslims. South Sudan, as a new nation, faces a number of difficulties. Its new government needed to remain stable to focus on nation building, but war has broken out between the government and a rebel faction. South Sudan, should it become stable again, should work to improve the education of its people, as the infographic explains, since the vote to secede needed symbols rather than words due to only 15% of its people being literate.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:05 PM

South Sudan has separated itself two years ago from the rest of Sudan. Its powers have become acknowledged by other countries and its messages to the outside world are ones of peace.

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What School Lunches Look Like In 20 Countries Around The World

Here are some pictures of school lunches from around the world. Korea clearly wins this one (Japan would have if it wasn't for that spaghetti).
Matthew Wahl's insight:

A good look at what students from around th world are eating...different priorities in the USA.

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Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 11, 2013 11:56 PM

Can you define the wealth of a country by what's in a lunch box?

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SproutRobot: The easy way to start a garden

SproutRobot: The easy way to start a garden | Human Geography | Scoop.it
SproutRobot sends you seeds and instructions right when it's time to plant.
Matthew Wahl's insight:

This website gives instructions on when to plant certain crops according to a zip code...Good link to organic local agriculture.

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Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s comment, March 7, 2013 10:13 PM
Anyone who wants to convert their yard into a garden plot should check this out.
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Climate Change Infographic

Climate Change Infographic | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Ignacio Conejo Moreno's curator insight, March 3, 2013 6:52 AM

Chungo futuro se nos presenta, si no cambiamos nuestros hábitos!

Emily Ross Cook's curator insight, March 4, 2013 8:44 AM

Humans must change their ways - what are some real life recommendations for changing?

mrjacquot's curator insight, March 6, 2013 8:48 PM

For all the doubters...

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March Madness: Make your picks in the Vatican's Sweet Sistine brackets! - Religion News Service

March Madness: Make your picks in the Vatican's Sweet Sistine brackets! - Religion News Service | Human Geography | Scoop.it
More than 100 Roman Catholic cardinals will gather in the Sistine Chapel in March. One will emerge as pope. Who will it be? The "Sweet Sistine" is our guess at the top candidates from each continent.

Via KochAPGeography
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KochAPGeography's curator insight, February 27, 2013 11:50 AM

With more than 1billion followers, the geographic diversity of today's Catholic church is vast.  With the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI, questions abound as to the identity of the next pope.  The Religion News Service takes this question to the next level.  Considering the popularity of betting services around the world, the bracket concept isn't that unlikely.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 7, 2013 10:12 AM

I won't pretend to know much about Catholic sucession, but this is pretty awesome. 

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What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food

What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Myths and facts about health, corruption, and saving the world

Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, locavore, unit 5 agriculture.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:59 PM

I mentioned this through an allusion in another article, but GMOs and the movements against them perplex me.  I don't think that fossil-fuel burning engines are natural, but many anti GMO people that claim they are bad for the environment leave me completely stunned as to their intolerance for what could possibly  benefit other people.  I feel very much an outsider when I examine many topics of controversy related to GMOs, and I am quite sure that I have consumed them before -- and loved them?  as for the FDA... I don't approve of the FDA.  They like more money coming into their pocket more than bettered well-being of citizens.  When I mentioned to my doctor that I wanted to apply for medical marijuana for a series of conditions that I have following a severe accident, I was told that they refused because it was not fully endorsed, approved, or even allowed by the FDA.  That really pissed me off because I suffer from excruciating pain every day and night of my life.  Could you imagine being a poor person in need of food, and the only viable way of getting food was through the production of GMOs...? and then some pseudo-hippie activists that didn't live through the 1960s trying to be all like, "We don't want anyone to have GMOs!"... I pose that abstractly, because I view most everything with a level of abstraction and distance from the situation, sampling perspectives with which I may empathize or consider.  I keep thinking that this world around us all came from a big bang, with other possible universes before that, and something  before that... and I really can't see Capitalism ever becoming as bad as it is, with such disregard for other people's wellbeing, until I look at today's world.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 4:02 PM

So many articles about organic or genetically engineered foods are written with someone with a very defined position on the subject (much like abortion, gun control or other controversial topics).  This article is an attempt to separate out the good the bad and the ugly regarding genetically engineered foods.   

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 12:00 PM
unit 5
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The state of trade with the United States - Quartz

The state of trade with the United States - Quartz | Human Geography | Scoop.it
An interactive tool by Quartz allowing for the exploration the US trade deficit or surplus with all of thier trading partners.
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West Wing - Why are we changing maps? - YouTube

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This is a good example of how map projections may reflect imperialist history and global political attitudes.

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Pop culture in the Arab world

TED Talks At TEDGlobal University, Shereen El Feki shows how some Arab cultures are borrowing trademarks of Western pop culture -- music videos, comics, even Barbie -- and adding a culturally appropriate twist.

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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 11:23 AM

I don't think popular culture and folk culture interact very well. They believe in completely different things and live different types of lives according to their values. The speaker means that the cultural interaction is intertwined together because of the islamic people who have borrowed cultural ideas from other ancient and modern civilizations and adapted it to their own. That's why it's meshed as a opposed to clashing or mash. For example, the music video channel that's like MTV. I think it's kind of funny how they made the people in that music video, that's from the USA, look like we also worship Allah. Also, the comic books show religious values in it, especially since the characters come from it. They want young people to not get sucked in to the outside world or modern culture from different societies, so instead they want to incorporate their religion with our ideas of culture.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:22 PM

unit 3

Jamey Kahl's curator insight, March 27, 11:09 PM

This TED talk cleverly discusses the cultural processes of globalization by examining two examples from the Islamic world.  The examples of the TV station 4Shbab and the comic book series The 99 show that all global cultural interactions don’t have to result in a homogenous “melting pot.”  Local cultural forces can tap into the powers of globalized culture that can create dynamic local cultures that are both intensely local and global. 


Questions to Ponder: What does the speaker mean when she by refers to cultural interactions as a mesh (as a opposed to a clash or mash) of civilizations?  What other examples of cultural meshes can you see that show these processes? 


Tags: TED, religion, culture, Islam, globalization, popular culture, unit 3 culture.

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The Global Religious Landscape - Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life

The Global Religious Landscape - Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A country-by-country analysis of data from more than 2,500 censuses, surveys and population registers finds that 84% of adults and children around the globe are religiously affiliated.
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