Human Geography
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Human Geography
AP Human Geo Resources
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Superimposed Borders

Sir Archibald Mapsalot III solves regional tensions in the Middle East.

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Joy Kinley's curator insight, September 9, 2013 10:31 AM

What we think of as permanent countries were often created as part of the colonial past.  Boundaries were done for the benefit of the former colonizer not for the new country and this legacy still causes problems today.

Mrs. B's curator insight, October 5, 2013 9:40 AM

Mapsalot. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:07 PM

unit 4

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Top 40 Chicago Words—Our Contributions to the English Language

Top 40 Chicago Words—Our Contributions to the English Language | Human Geography | Scoop.it
OUR TALK: Chicago’s history weaves through English—we identified the 40 words where the city’s voice speaks loudest
Matthew Wahl's insight:

Yep...we are pretty awesome.

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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


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Abby Laybourn's curator insight, December 10, 2014 1:25 PM

Although this was kind of hard to read it was interesting to see how different religions are related and where they stem from. 

Marita Viitanen's curator insight, January 31, 2015 6:48 PM

Tämä puu jotakuinkin hämmentää...

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:16 PM

Unit 1 Geography: Its nature and perspectives

Although the article relating to this diagram is in Russian, the diagram is not, and I found it to be a very interesting visual to not only show world religions developing on a time scale, but also because it does a very good job of showing just how many little divisions of each religion they are, and how they are all intertwined. Zooming in on the diagram, you are able to see each divide, each new branch, and each date for hundreds of sets of information.

 

This illustrates the theme of identification of major world religions because it simply shows the mass amounts of tiny divisions that occur in the major world religions in a simple format. This is very helpful because this would be pages of writing if you tried to write it all out. 

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Redistricting

How can cartography swing and election?  Simple.


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Miroslav Milosavljević's comment, July 27, 2013 5:56 PM
This great video example may serve students for a better understanding the term. Well done!
Dean Haakenson's curator insight, July 28, 2013 10:40 AM
Thanks Seth Dixon for Scooping this! And thanks Mr. Burton for rescooping. Great lesson for government and geography.
Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:14 AM
this video shows the process from which political candidates win their respective elections. gerrymandering is an illegal use of power in the respect to redistricting and moving town lines in order to pump up voting power. this is an illegal action that happens countless times in elections and taper to higher powers. this gerrymandering idea takes the voter power to elect and puts it into the hands of the actual political personnel. by reshaping you can stack votes into one particular area this way you are guaranteed to win that district. this is where you see districts with these crazy shaped areas rather than nice square or other simple shapes.
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What if Americans Only Had as Much Water as Families in Africa?

What if Americans Only Had as Much Water as Families in Africa? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The average family in Africa gets by on only five gallons of water a day, according to this thought-provoking PSA video from bewaterwise.com, a project of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California.
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Africa's 'new cities': Urban future or utopian fantasies?

Africa's 'new cities': Urban future or utopian fantasies? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Gleaming high-tech cities are being planned across Africa. Some say they are unrealistic, others say they are the future.
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Flags Quiz 3 | Box Clever | QuizFortune

Flags Quiz 3 | Box Clever | QuizFortune | Human Geography | Scoop.it

MORE Fun With Flags.

 

From symbols and shapes to colours and crests, how familiar are you with the world of flags? Play now and see if you can be the 'star' of this quiz!

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Grygiel's curator insight, September 28, 2013 2:33 PM

Could be fun for our World Cup prep!

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CNN video on Facebook - CNN.com Video

CNN video on Facebook - CNN.com Video
Matthew Wahl's insight:

Inside Africa looks at how deforestation is affecting the Baka people, who are intimately linked to the forest.

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595 - It’s Always Chile in Norway: the Five Types of Territorial Morphology | Strange Maps | Big Think

595 - It’s Always Chile in Norway: the Five Types of Territorial Morphology | Strange Maps | Big Think | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Do Norwegians feel curiously at home in Chile, and vice versa? Do South Africans have a strange affinity with Italians? And Filipinos with Maldivians?
Matthew Wahl's insight:

...explains the shapes of states.

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:11 PM

unit 4

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 26, 2015 11:08 AM

This article reminds us all of the growth-stunt that colonialism in Africa brought to the continent.  It is not surprising to see that most African countries still depend heavily on their old colonial masters for survival.  People who may casually follow African politics might think that colonialism started with the Berlin Conference and ended in 1990 or so, but one could argue that it hasn't ended due to the urgent dependency African countries still have on their old colonizers.  Africa might be the most beautiful continent in the world but has the worst story of any in the world.

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Song: European Union

Song: European Union | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Germany and France spent decades at each others' throats. Now, bound by a common currency, they're working together to save the euro zone. It's a story that's begging for a musical number — which, as it happens, we have right here."


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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:21 AM

Yet, they are both singing in the English man language, like wanted to be heard by glorious England. The European Union is strong, but at the same time fragile. It feel it can break by any politic different.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 15, 2014 6:03 PM

Looking at European history as a whole this recent unity between nations, especially Germany and France is an incredibly new and unusual concept. For centuries European countries have been at one another's throats only in the late 20th century has this changed. While this idea of a musical is humors it shows that because of globalization and economics these nations have bounded together and now are heavily reliant upon one another.   

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 1:04 PM

Its humorous how after years of being in conflict with one another, this song manages to highlight the ways in which France and Germany, along with other European countries have manged to over their differences. Along in this song highlights the things in which these countries are known for demonstrates the pure genius in all of this.

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Kabul, A City Stretched Beyond Its Limits

Decades of war, migration and chaotic sprawl have turned the Afghan capital into a barely functioning dust bowl. The city's tired infrastructure is crumbling; water, sewers and electricity are in short supply.

 

Keeping an urban system running smoothly is a difficult proposition in developed countries that are stable--what is in like a place like Afghanistan?  This podcast is a excellent glimpse into the cultural, economic, environmental and political struggles of a city like Kabul.  This is urban geography in about a problematic a situation as possible.   


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John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, October 26, 2014 9:06 PM

Kabul, a once thriving city is now the product of a war torn Afghanistan. During the fighting mass exodus left the city empty and uninhibited. However, after the war civilians fled back to the slums of Kabul in search of job opportunities. With little infrastructure, no electricity, no water due to evapotranspiration and deforestation and a serious overcrowding problem, residents lack the essential resources needed to survive. Due to the cities destabilized economy corruption runs rampant, in consequence it is unsafe to live in the city center. The advocation for city services is high upon the minds of the people. In response, compounds have been made in the foothills to house impoverished people. These compounds will help the overcrowding problem but the informal economy and dangerous shortcuts will further cause destabilization and create an unsafe city center. 

 

 

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 1:32 AM

This audio clip provided a detailed view of the capital of Afghanistan, Kabul. It doesn't speak of the city architecture instead it focuses on the failing logistics of the city. It talks about resource shortages and the sheer amount of people crammed within the city. These problems are largely caused by an influx of refugees from the war torn countryside flooding into the city for safety and work. This clip shows the Kabul of today, a ghost of its former prestigious self.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:37 PM

A war torn country of Afghanistan's capital city Kabul is in the mountains. With a population of five million people, the cities infrastructure is in ruins. Things we take for granted, water, sewers and electricity are all in short supply for Kabul. There is lots of money coming in to the country from corruption of opium trade. Due to terrible construction, it is assumed that when Kabul has their terrible earthquake that there will be much destruction. Cars pack streets that are unpaved and the streets are five to ten times more packed than they are planned out to be. Just to get from one side of Kabul to the other it can take hours. What the government needs to is control immigration and fix the problems that they currently have. 

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Apple's Child-Labor Problem Runs Deep

Apple's Child-Labor Problem Runs Deep | Human Geography | Scoop.it
In a multi-layered, Foxconn-sprinkled update on its working conditions in Chinese factories, Apple has released a report that claims to have found no underage workers in "any of our final assembly suppliers." But Apple's supply chain goes much...
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Do Christians, Muslims and Jews worship the same God?

Do Christians, Muslims and Jews worship the same God? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Opinion by Jeffrey Weiss, Special to CNN


(CNN) -- Sunni and Shia Muslims are killing each other in several nations, most notably in Syria's escalating civil war.

Coptic Christians churches are being torched in Egypt.
Matthew Wahl's insight:

Good intro to monotheism...shows how each of the "big three" tackles the issue of having the same Abrahamic tradition. 

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Rap, Drugs, And Hijabs: 13 Things You Should Know About Young Iran

Rap, Drugs, And Hijabs: 13 Things You Should Know About Young Iran | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The future of Iran will be determined by the first post-Revolution generation. Here's what they're like.
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BBC Country Profiles

BBC Country Profiles | Human Geography | Scoop.it
BBC Country Profiles: instant guide to history, politics and economic background of countries and territories, and background on key institutions.

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Al Picozzi's comment, July 25, 2013 4:55 PM
Great site for quick info. Thanks
Sabrina Wesley's curator insight, July 26, 2013 12:53 AM

Use for History, Geography, and Math

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 30, 2013 5:06 AM

I need a one-stop shop for my classes and maybe this is it.

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What Do We Mean by 'Reading' Maps?

What Do We Mean by 'Reading' Maps? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The common-core standards present an ambiguous message on how to draw information from maps and charts, Phil Gersmehl says.

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mufidmmn's comment, July 24, 2013 4:08 AM
ngapain itu ya
Taryn Coxall's curator insight, August 5, 2013 9:38 PM

This is a resource i feel would be relevant to those students who struggle to be egaged in their reading

This can be used on readers on many different level

the reading maps foccus on language arts, Its description is communicated through charts, graphs, and maps intead of normal paragraphs and text

Shelby Porter's comment, September 30, 2013 11:19 AM
I feel the skill of reading a map is very important, but it becoming less prevalent in classrooms. Teachers may find it more difficult to teach and therefore are not going in depth with it. I remember as a child in grade school we would color maps or have to find where the states are. We never were taught how to fully understand the uses of a map and all the different ways they are used and how to read them. It is becoming a lost skill in a world that needs to be more appreciative of geography.
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The Burgess and Hoyt Models

The Burgess and Hoyt Models | Human Geography | Scoop.it

It is possible in many cities to identify zones with a particular type of land use - eg a residential zone. Often these zones have developed due to a combination of economic and social factors. In some cases planners may have tried to separate out some land uses, eg an airport is separated from a large housing estate.

 

The concentric and sector models in one news article?  The BBC is showing once again the possibilities available if only the United States taught more geography in the schools. 

 

Tags: urban, models, unit 7 cities, APHG.


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:35 PM

This article was great in that it left me with some great visuals and details on each of the models. For me, it's hard to remember each one of the models but this article really allowed me to compare each one and read about each one all in one place. The layout of the article was also nice and I think that it was just a great overall reminder of the models.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:56 PM

This article teaches you mainly about the Burgess and Hoyt Model. It compares the two, and it gives you detailed information on lots of the urbanization terms.

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it talks about how geographers drew up cities and made models of how cities were drawn up. It teaches you how they thought back then, and how urbanization has evolved from then to now.

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 5:26 PM
unit 7
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High-Fructose Corn Syrup: The "Dark Lord" of Nutrition

Hank takes on high fructose corn syrup - the new "dark lord of nutrition" - to help explain the ambiguities around all the claims being made about it. Like S...
Matthew Wahl's insight:

The science behind HFCS...might not be as bad as advertised.

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Demographic Trends in Muslim Countries - Population Reference Bureau

Muslims account for around one-fifth of the world's population, or about 1.6 billion people. They represent the majority population in about 50 countries and territories clustered in Asia and Africa.
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DTM in majority Muslnat states. 

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A 'Whom Do You Hang With?' Map Of America : NPR

A 'Whom Do You Hang With?' Map Of America : NPR | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Put away that old Rand McNally map — it's time for a new way to see what America really looks like.
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Eco-tourism in Tunisia's new era

Eco-tourism in Tunisia's new era | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A slump in the number of visitors to Tunisia since the country's revolution has forced those in the tourism industry to rethink their businesses.
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Writing FRQs

"AP Human Geography Free Response Questions should be approached in a very deliberate and specific way. APHG teacher Tom Landon explains his approach to teaching students how to do it."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 2013 3:10 PM

For those preparing students for the AP Human Geography test, this video gives great advice to help you instruct students on how to approach the Free Response Questions (FRQs).  Understanding the content always comes first, but some bright students who I know understand the content fail to read the instructions or to answer every portion of the questions.  This will help those APHG students.


TagsAPHG, training, geography education.

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Urban Trees Reveal Income Inequality

Urban Trees Reveal Income Inequality | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Wealthy cities seem to have it all. Expansive, well-manicured parks. Fine dining. Renowned orchestras and theaters. More trees. Wait, trees?

 

I certainly wouldn't argue that trees create economic inequality, but there appears to be a strong correlation in between high income neighborhoods and large mature trees in cities throughout the world (for a scholarly reference from the Journal, Landscape and Urban Planning, see: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204607002174 ). Why is there such a connection? In terms of landscape analysis, what does this say about those who have created these environments? Why do societies value trees in cities? How does the presence of trees change the sense of place of a particular neighborhood? For more Google images that show the correlation between income and trees (and to share your own), see: http://persquaremile.com/2012/05/24/income-inequality-seen-from-space/


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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:00 AM
this short article explains the evidence supporting tree to rich cities ratio. it goes to show that if I'm going to pay big bucks for location I would want the scenery to be beautiful hands down. they mention the per capita increase to tree ratio and how its only a dollar that influences such a high quantity of trees in city. bottom line is that it makes sense for the more trees in wealthier neighborhoods of the city because when your in the heart of the city you tend to see quantity of quality of homes and being jammed packed into small square footage doesn't leave much room for nature. but go just outside the city where the real estate is high and more spacious and you will find more trees the further and further from the center.
megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 1:04 AM
Like a previous article it explains how if viewing a neighborhood with lush grass and huge yards with landscaped grounds it is associated with big money. People pay top dollar for houses that have huge back yards and privacy of trees. You would not see yards like this is the city though so these neighborhoods on the outskirts of the citylines.
Shaun Scallan's curator insight, January 27, 2014 11:48 PM

Interesting the value, in the broadest sense, that trees can bring in an urban setting